Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Wed, 18 Jul 2018 18:15:59 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 potters http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1030&title=potters&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1030&amp;title=potters&amp;cat=501"><img title="030.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/030.JPG" alt="030.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance<br /><br />1 comment ecobalance Thu, 14 Jun 2007 11:47:20 +0000 Blue face with special mark http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1004&title=blue-face-with-special-mark&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1004&amp;title=blue-face-with-special-mark&amp;cat=501"><img title="DSC_01780001.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/DSC_01780001.JPG" alt="DSC_01780001.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: marlon_mht<br /><br />Description: Blue face with special mark<br /><br />1 comment marlon_mht Mon, 29 Jan 2007 15:26:04 +0000 IMG_0105 http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=990&title=img-0105&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=990&amp;title=img-0105&amp;cat=501"><img title="IMG_0105.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/IMG_0105.JPG" alt="IMG_0105.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: sea worthy<br /><br />Description: map angel sea worthy Sun, 29 Oct 2006 21:23:43 +0000 bandit Angel - Desmoholacanthus arcuatus http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=964&title=bandit-angeldesmoholacanthus-arcuatus&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=964&amp;title=bandit-angeldesmoholacanthus-arcuatus&amp;cat=501"><img title="holo.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/holo.jpg" alt="holo.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: pactrop<br /><br />Description: bandit Angel - Desmoholacanthus arcuatus, grows to about 7in. Endimic to Hawaii<br /><br />4 comments pactrop Wed, 04 Oct 2006 09:11:10 +0000 emperor angel http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=935&title=emperor-angel&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=935&amp;title=emperor-angel&amp;cat=501"><img title="IMG_0035.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/IMG_0035.JPG" alt="IMG_0035.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: sea worthy<br /><br />Description: emperor angel sea worthy Sun, 03 Sep 2006 02:45:00 +0000 emperor angel http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=933&title=emperor-angel&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=933&amp;title=emperor-angel&amp;cat=501"><img title="IMG_0065.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/IMG_0065.jpg" alt="IMG_0065.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: sea worthy<br /><br />Description: emperor angel sea worthy Sun, 03 Sep 2006 02:11:01 +0000 Blue Back Angel http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=855&title=blue-back-angel&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=855&amp;title=blue-back-angel&amp;cat=501"><img title="IMG_2915_25335_35997_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/IMG_2915_25335_35997_.jpg" alt="IMG_2915_25335_35997_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: <br /><br />1 comment Sat, 05 Nov 2005 10:52:42 +0000 ASFUR ANGELFISH http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=842&title=asfur-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=842&amp;title=asfur-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="picshow_30_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/picshow_30_.jpg" alt="picshow_30_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: <br /><br />1 comment Sun, 09 Oct 2005 05:53:37 +0000 picshow_32_ http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=841&title=picshow-32-&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=841&amp;title=picshow-32-&amp;cat=501"><img title="picshow_32_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/picshow_32_.jpg" alt="picshow_32_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Sat, 08 Oct 2005 08:59:03 +0000 Easter angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=840&title=easter-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=840&amp;title=easter-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="picshow_34_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/picshow_34_.jpg" alt="picshow_34_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Sat, 08 Oct 2005 08:51:55 +0000 cocos angelfisf http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=839&title=cocos-angelfisf&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=839&amp;title=cocos-angelfisf&amp;cat=501"><img title="picshow_31_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/picshow_31_.jpg" alt="picshow_31_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: <br /><br />2 comments Sat, 08 Oct 2005 08:45:54 +0000 Scribbled Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=802&title=scribbled-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=802&amp;title=scribbled-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41image001.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41image001.jpg" alt="41image001.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Chaetodontoplus duboulayi[/i] Max. size: 28.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~11 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = northern Australia and parts of Indonesia, southward to Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 21 Biology: Inhabits coastal and inner reef areas with rubble, soft bottoms, or open flat bottom areas with rock, coral, sponge, and seawhip outcrops. May be found in small groups. Feeds on sponges and tunicates. Forms pairs or small groups. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade Aquarium Care: Provide good hiding spots and nice swimming room. Scribbled Angelfish will nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, zoanthids, and may eat soft corals. It will also graze on diatoms and some filamentous algae. A good aquarium fish, and once adjusted can become quite rambunctious. Photo Credit ©Bob Fenner mojoreef Mon, 17 Jan 2005 14:51:50 +0000 Coral Beauty http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=561&title=coral-beauty&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=561&amp;title=coral-beauty&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Coral-Beauty.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Coral-Beauty.jpg" alt="450Coral-Beauty.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Centropyge bispinosa Common Names: Coral Beauty, Twospined Angelfish, Dusky Angelfish Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 9 - 45 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Tuamoto Islands, north to the Izus, south to Lord Howe Island; throughout Micronesia; excluding the Red Sea, Hawaii, and southern Pacific Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19. Color in life variable; predominantly light orange with the barring broken into a series of spots; others almost entirely purple. Often very pale in deep water and bright orange form in the Pacific that looks near identical to C. aurantia. Biology: Secretive species found in lagoon and seaward reef slopes in areas with rich coral growth. Found singly or in aggregations; forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Feeds on algae. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: May nip at Tridacnid clams and LPS. This is a hardy, brightly colored, available, and reasonably priced species. It is not as aggressive as other Centropyge spp., but may be assertive after it is established. A larger tank will decrease the chance of picking on some invertebrates. <br /><br />3 comments NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 14:17:11 +0000 Keyhole Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=560&title=keyhole-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=560&amp;title=keyhole-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Keyhole-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Keyhole-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Keyhole-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Centropyge tibicen Common Names: Keyhole Angelfish, Melas Angelfish Max. size: 19.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) 7.5 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 4 - 55 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific =Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean to Vanuatu, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island, throughout Micronesia. Uncommon around oceanic islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-17. Overall black with an elongate vertical black blotch on the middle of the upper sides. When small, mainly black with a white bar; the white bar changes to a central blotch and varies greatly in shape and size. Dorsal and anal fins with submarginal blue line; most of the pelvic and the anterior portion of the anal fin yellow. Caudal fin with submarginal blue line. Biology: Relatively uncommon in mixed coral and rubble areas of lagoon and seaward reefs. The largest member of the genus. Feeds mainly on algae. Forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: May nip at Tridacnid clams, zoanthids, LPS, and softies. A bold and durable species that can be belligerent to other pygmy angels and fish added after it has become established. The Keyhole Angel will graze on filamentous algae and diatoms. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 14:10:42 +0000 Fisher's Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=559&title=fisher-27s-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=559&amp;title=fisher-27s-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Fisher_s-Angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Fisher_s-Angel.jpg" alt="450Fisher_s-Angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Centropyge fisheri Common Names: Fisher's Angelfish, Orange Angelfish Max. size: 6.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) 2.4 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 10 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = restricted to the Hawaiian Islands. Most records from the Indian Ocean probably are misidentifications of Centropyge acanthops. Records from the western Pacific are probably misidentifications of Centropyge flavicauda, now considered a probable synonym of Centropyge fisheri. Morphology: Overall yellow-orange with a black blotch about equal to eye diameter just above the pectoral-fin base, and numerous closely-set fine black dots along the base of the dorsal and anal fins. Pelvic fins blue; anal fin with blue margin. Biology: Found in areas with rubble bottom. Aquarium Care: Provide hiding places. Will spend time peeking from the hiding spots or dashing from one crevice to another. Feeds on diatoms, and can be aggressive to more peaceful tankmates (especially in a smaller tank). NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 14:03:00 +0000 Orangelined Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=558&title=orangelined-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=558&amp;title=orangelined-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Eibl_s-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Eibl_s-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Eibl_s-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Centropyge eibli Common Names: Orangelined Angelfish, Eibl's Angelfish, Blacktail Angelfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) 5.9 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Sri Lanka to the eastern Indo-Malaya region. Morphology: Overall color is white with narrow wavy golden brown vertical stripes on the sides. Chest, base of the pectoral fin, and the outline of the operculum orange or golden brown. Caudal fin and the adjacent posterior portion of the dorsal fin black with submarginal narrow whitish blue band. Biology: Inhabits rocky areas of seaward reefs as well as rich coral areas. Feeds on algae; forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Forms hybrids with Centropyge vrolikii in areas where these 2 species are sympatric, and hybrids with the C. flavissima have been recorded in the Christmas I. and Cocos-Keeling islands in the eastern Indian Ocean. Mimicked by the juveniles of the acanthurid Acanthurus tristis. Aquarium Care: Provide live rock and microaglae growth. May nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, zoanthids, and may eat some softies. The Orangelined Angel may show aggression to smaller fish (especially in a smaller sized tank). NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 13:57:13 +0000 Venusta Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=557&title=venusta-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=557&amp;title=venusta-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Venusta-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Venusta-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Venusta-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracentropyge venusta Common Names: Venusta Angelfish, Purple Masked Angelfish Max. size: 12.0 cm NG (male/unsexed) 4.7 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 40 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = Japan to the northern Philippines. Morphology:   Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 15 Biology: Inhabits steep outer reef slopes; in ledges and caves. Shy species, not easily approached at close range. Usually observed singly, almost always upside down in reef caves; also forms pairs or small groups. Natural diet unknown. Sometimes forms hybrids with Paracentropyge multifasciata. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide numerous hiding spots, caves and overhangs. May nip at Tridacnid clams and LPS. A difficult species to keep, as they are hard to feed. Tankmates should not be aggressive, but is best kept singly, male-female pair, or harem. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 13:48:44 +0000 Multibarred Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=556&title=multibarred-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=556&amp;title=multibarred-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Multibarred-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Multibarred-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Multibarred-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracentropyge multifasciata Common Names: Multibarred Angelfish, Manybanded Angelfish Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) 4.7 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range 7 - 70 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Cocos-Keeling Atoll to the Society Islands, north to the Yaeyama Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-19; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Generally white with 8 brown bars extending through to dorsal and anal fins (becoming orange-yellow ventrally), the first running through the eye and the last running across the base of the caudal fin. A yellow bar runs in the middle of each white interspace on the side. A black spot is on the distal part of the soft portion of the dorsal fin. Biology: Inhabits ledges and caves and crevices of steep outer reef slopes; occasionally found in clear lagoon reefs. It is secretive and rarely goes out more than a few centimeters from an escape hole. Forms pairs or small groups. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade. Usually starves when kept in captivity. Often upside-down. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places (a shy and retiring species). This fish will adapt more easily if provided a tank with reduced light levels. The Mulitbarred Angel has difficulty adapting to captivity. Can be kept with non-aggressive species, best if kept singly or male-female pair. Often difficult to feed. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 13:37:26 +0000 Black Velvet Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=555&title=black-velvet-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=555&amp;title=black-velvet-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450BlackVelvet-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450BlackVelvet-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450BlackVelvet-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodontoplus melanosoma Common Names: Black Velvet Angelfish, Gray Poma Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 25 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Indo-Malayan region and New Guinea , northward to southern Japan. Morphology: Several similar species, easily confused. Juveniles are almost identical as in other species complexes in the genus. Most confusion is caused as color changes occur with growth that may match between different species at certain stages, especially the caudal fin pattern that maybe yellow in sub-adults on one and yellow in adults of others. Biology: An uncommon species that inhabits coastal reefs and drop-offs that are exposed to strong tidal currents. Juveniles on deep rubble slopes with rich invertebrate growth. Feeds on sponges and tunicates. Solitary or in pairs. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide hiding places and nonaggressive tankmates. This fish is usually not terribly aggressive, and will graze on filamentous algae and diatoms. The Black Velvet Angel may nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, soft corals, and zoanthids. <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 13:30:12 +0000 Sixbanded Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=554&title=sixbanded-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=554&amp;title=sixbanded-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Sixbanded-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Sixbanded-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Sixbanded-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus sexstriatus Common Names: Sixbanded Angelfish, Sixbar Angelfish Max. size: 46.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) ~18 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 50 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Ryukyu Islands to Malaysia and Indonesia to Solomon Islands, south to Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18-23; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-19. Adults yellowish tan with 5 black bars on the sides; scales with blue spots in the middle; head blackish with a white bar behind the eye, running from below the origin of the dorsal fin to the lower edge of the operculum; the caudal and the posterior portions of the dorsal and anal fins with blue spots. Juveniles blackish with about 15 curved narrow blue and white bars on the sides. Biology: Juveniles prefer sheltered inner reefs while adults occur in areas of rich coral growth and high vertical relief of lagoon and seaward reefs. Adults semi-silty coastal to about 50 m depth, often seen in pairs. Occur solitary or mostly in pairs, are very elusive. Emits loud grunting sounds when harassed. Only the young make excellent aquarium fish. Aquarium Care: Provide hiding spots to go to when startled. Will nip at Tridacnid clams, soft and stony corals. A hardy species, but grows quite large. This fish is known for a grunting sound to warn approaching divers. The sound is occasionally heard in aquaria when keeping with other large angelfish. In the wild, it is often seen in pairs. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 13:21:53 +0000 Blackspot Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=553&title=blackspot-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=553&amp;title=blackspot-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Blackspot-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Blackspot-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Blackspot-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Genicanthus melanospilos Common Names: Blackspot Angelfish, Spotbreast Angelfish Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 20 - 45 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = Ryukyu Islands southward to the Indo-Australian Archipelago (including Rowley Shoals, Western Australia), Fiji and New Caledonia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Males light bluish with about 15 narrow black bars on the sides extending to the top of the head, and a large black spot on breast; females without bars, yellow on the upper sides and light blue below, and with broad submarginal bands on the dorsal and ventral edges of the caudal fin. Biology: Generally seen in pairs on steep outer reef slopes, drop-offs, in caves or along the bases of boulders; in rich coral growth interspersed with sand. Usually occurs in loose groups of females dominated by a male. Sometimes feeds on plankton high above the substrate. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of swimming room. No threat to soft or stony corals. Will adapt to captivity and foods. Ignores other fish species (including angels), but may chase small planktivores. mals might fight with other males in this genus, but this fish can be kept in pairs (small groups in bigger tanks). One male per tank. <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 12:41:32 +0000 Lamarck's Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=552&title=lamarck-27s-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=552&amp;title=lamarck-27s-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Lamarck_s-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Lamarck_s-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Lamarck_s-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Genicanthus lamarck Common Names: Lamarck's Angelfish, Lamarck Angelfish, Freckletail Lyretail Angelfish Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), 9.8 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 35 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Indo-Malayan region, eastward to Vanuatu, north to southern Japan, southward to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-17. Overall white with 3 black stripes on side; dorsal fin with broad submarginal black band; caudal fin with black dots, female with broad black band on the dorsal and ventral edges; pelvic fins white in female, black in male; a few irregular bands radiate from the eye in male. Biology: Inhabit shallow reef crests and deep reefs adjacent to steep slopes. Form aggregations to feed in midwater well above the bottom; harems of 3-7 individuals. Feeds on plankton. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of swimming space. No threat to soft or stony corals. Adapts well to captive life in a well maintained tank. They swim about quite actively most of the day. not aggressive to other fish (including angels), but may chase small planktivores (i.e. anthias fire gobies, and fairy and flasher wrasses). One male per tank, but in a very large tank can be kept in pairs or small aggregations. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 12:29:46 +0000 Watanabe's Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=551&title=watanabe-27s-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=551&amp;title=watanabe-27s-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Watanabe_s-Angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Watanabe_s-Angelfish.jpg" alt="450Watanabe_s-Angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Genicanthus watanabei Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~6 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 21 - 81 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Central Pacific = Ryukyu Islands, south to New Caledonia and the Great Barrier Reef; including Cook Islands, Tuamoto Archipelago, and Pitcairn. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 15-16; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14-17. Males light blue with 8 black stripes on the lower 2/3 of the body (the posterior end of the uppermost yellow, the lowermost stripes extending the adjacent anal fin); females light blue with a vertical black bar above the eye and spots on the forehead; both sexes with a broad submarginal band on the dorsal and anal fins; females with broad submarginal band on the caudal-fin lobes. Biology: Occurs in current-swept outer reef slopes and drop-offs. Feeds on plankton. Forms harems of 2-5 individuals. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Will not bother reef invertebrates. Adjusts better to a deep water reef tank, or a tank that is dimly lit. Most Watanabe's suffer from swim bladder damage, however, a healthy specimen can be kept in a peaceful tank. If more than one is to be kept, then a male - female pair is recommended (2 males will fight). <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 12:12:15 +0000 Blue Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=550&title=blue-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=550&amp;title=blue-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Hober_u2.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Hober_u2.jpg" alt="450Hober_u2.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Holacanthus bermudensis Max. size: 45.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 2 - 92 m Climate: subtropical Distribution: Western Atlantic =Bermuda, Bahamas and off southern Florida, USA to the Gulf of Mexico. Also to Yucatan, Mexico. Morphology: Soft parts of dorsal and anal fins and caudal fins have wide yellow margins. Dark spot on forehead lacks electric blue ring. Juveniles blue, banded, with last prominent band straight. The pectorals are blue basally, clear distally, with a broad yellow band separating the two colors; the pelvic fins are light yellow. Biology: Inhabits rocky or coral reefs. Juveniles in channels and on inshore reefs. Feeds primarily on sponges. Small juveniles do well in aquariums once they begin to accept food. Aquarium Care: Provide alot of swimming space and hiding spots. Nips at Tridacnid clams, stony and soft corals. A good species for those just starting to keep larger angelfish. Liable to fight with tankmates. Should not be kept with other large angels. <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 12:02:16 +0000 King Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=549&title=king-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=549&amp;title=king-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Hopas_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Hopas_u1.jpg" alt="450Hopas_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Holacanthus passer Common Names: King Angelfish, Passer Angelfish Max. size: 35.6 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~14 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 4 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Pacific = Gulf of California to Peru, including the Galapagos Islands. Biology: Diurnal grazer on sessile invertebrates and algae but specializes to a larger extent on sponges. Also feeds on plankton. Reproduction occurs in late summer. Females are more territorial and form pair bonds with the males. Sometimes forms mixed aggregations with Pomacanthus zonipectus. Cleaning behavior has been observed in juveniles. Aquarium Care: Will nip at Tridacnid clams, soft and stony corals. The King/Passer Angelfish cannot be kept with more passive fish or even sedenatry predators, as it will pick at them. Females have white pelvic fins, while males have yellow.<br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 11:45:06 +0000 Flagfin Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=548&title=flagfin-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=548&amp;title=flagfin-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450flagfin-angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450flagfin-angel.jpg" alt="450flagfin-angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Apolemichthys trimaculatus Common Names: Flagfin Angelfish, Three spot Angel Max. size: 26.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 40 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = East Africa south to 28°S and east to Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19. Body short and deep, and strongly compressed. Preorbital bone convex and without strong spines. Overall color is bright yellow with a broad black band on the edge of the anal fin and a broad white zone above it. A black spot is on the forehead and a ocellated dark spot just behind the head; the lips are blue. Juveniles have a false eye-spot at the base of the soft dorsal fin and a thin black line over the head, running through the eye. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs; found near coral. Feeds mainly on sponges and tunicates. Juveniles secretive and occur below 25 m. Adults in small but loose groups at moderate depths. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide hiding places, and a lot of live rock encrusted with invertebrates. May nip at Tridacnid clam, stony and soft corals. Does not usually do well in captivity. Younger specimens increase survivability, as do individuals from other areas than the Philippines. Normally the flagfin isn't overly aggressive, but may fight with other angels. One per tank. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 05:21:29 +0000 Blueface Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=547&title=blueface-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=547&amp;title=blueface-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450blueface-angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450blueface-angel.jpg" alt="450blueface-angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus xanthometopon Common Names: Blueface Angelfish, Yellowface Angel Max. size: 38.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 25 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Maldives to Vanuatu, north to the Yaeyama Islands; Palau and Krosae in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-18 Biology: Found in coral rich areas of lagoons, channels, and outer reef slopes. Often near caves. Juveniles settle in very shallow inshore caves with algae growth. Usually solitary. Feeds on sponges and other encrusting organisms and tunicates. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade. Individuals under 20 cm in length are best adapted to tank life. Aquarium Care: Provide numerous hiding spots, plenty of live rock to graze on, and swimming room. Will nip at Tridacnid clams, soft and stony corals. Tends to initially be shy, but may come out more if placed in a tank with non-aggressive fish. This species isn't as aggressive as other angels, but may chase closely related specimens. A moderately hardy fish for experienced aquarists. <br /><br />4 comments NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 05:07:15 +0000 Yellowbar Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=546&title=yellowbar-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=546&amp;title=yellowbar-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Yellowbar-Angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Yellowbar-Angel.jpg" alt="450Yellowbar-Angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus maculosus Common Names: Yellowbar Angelfish, Maculosus Angel, Map Angel, Blue Moon Angelfish Max. size: 50.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 4 - 50 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea, Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman to at least 13°S. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-20 Biology: More often in silty reef areas than in rich coral growth. Aquarium Care: Will nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS and soft corals like Xenia. Usually OK with SPS and more noxious softies. The easiest member of this genus to keep and is a great first large angelfish. Can be aggressive with passive tankmates, fish introduced after establishment, or other angels. Hardier than P. asfur. <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 04:52:47 +0000 Koran Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=545&title=koran-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=545&amp;title=koran-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Koran-Angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Koran-Angel.jpg" alt="450Koran-Angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus semicirculatus Common Names: Koran Angelfish, Semicircular/Semicircle Angelfish, Halfcircled Angelfish Max. size: 40.0 cm SL (male/unsexed), ~15.7 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to Western Australia and New South Wales, including Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-23; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-22. Juveniles of this species are bluish black with concentric white semi-circles. Adults brownish on anterior and posterior third of the body; middle portion greenish or yellowish; numerous blue spots on the sides; posterior part of dorsal and anal fins prolonged as a filament, the tips bright yellow. Transformation to the adult color pattern occurs over the size range of about 8 - 16 cm. Biology: Juveniles inhabit shallow protected areas, while adults prefer coastal reefs with heavy coral growth providing ample hiding places. Generally solitary or in pairs. Feeds on sponges, tunicates, and algae. The young are excellent aquarium fish and suitable for a community tank. Aquarium Care: Nips at Tridacnid clams, soft and stoney corals. A great fish that thrives if provided a well maintained system. The Koran Angel eats a variety of foods including algae (even cyano). Juveniles have a beautiful coloration, that changes as the fish matures. A juvenile should be intorduced last to the tank. NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 04:20:05 +0000 Bluegirdled Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=544&title=bluegirdled-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=544&amp;title=bluegirdled-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450bluegirdled-angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450bluegirdled-angel.jpg" alt="450bluegirdled-angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus navarchus Max. size: 28.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 40 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Indonesia to Papua New Guinea, north to the Philippines, south to Rowley Shoals and the southern Great Barrier Reef; Belau and Yap in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18. Juveniles black with light blue curve vertical stripes on the sides. Adults are bright yellow on sides and back, dorsal and caudal fins, with numerous blue spots; head and ventral portion of the body, pectoral and pelvic fins dark blue with numerous light blue spots on the posterior portion of the anal fin and the adjacent caudal peduncle area. Narrow light blue streaks run across the face from below the eye, and on the area just behind the head. Fins edged light blue. Biology: Occurs in coral rich areas of clear lagoons, channels, and protected outer reef slopes. Changes to adult pattern is dramatic, and intermediate stage are rarely seen. Often solitary. Feeds on sponges and tunicates. Uncommon. Highly prized aquarium export. Aquarium Care: Needs &quot;bolt&quot; holes to retreat to. Will nip at LPS, some soft corals like xenia, and Tridacnid clams. Usually can be kept with SPS and more noxious softies. Not difficult to keep, but is shy. Juveniles spend a lot of time hiding, and are very reclusive. Adults are also shy, but will make trips into the open. Easily startled, and requires &quot;bolt&quot; holes to swim into. Can be ggressive to related species and similarly shaped fish. <br /><br />2 comments NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 04:01:41 +0000 Asfur Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=451&title=asfur-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=451&amp;title=asfur-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="450Asfur-Angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/450Asfur-Angel.jpg" alt="450Asfur-Angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus asfur Common Names: Asfur Angelfish, Arabian Angelfish Max. size: 40.0 cm Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range 3 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, south to Zanzibar. Biology: Common around semi-protected inshore reefs with rich soft and hard coral growth, occasional patches of silt bottom. Very aggressive toward its own species, unless paired. Feeds mainly on sponges and tunicates. Aquarium Care: Only one per tank, with hiding places. The Asfur Angel is one of the shyest of the Pomacanthus genus. Not normally a very aggressive fish, the Asfur may pick on new tankmates (especially if other angels). Sometimes difficult to get to eat. It may take up to a week, and require the introduction of live foods for encouragement. <br /><br />3 comments NaH2O Wed, 29 Dec 2004 18:50:35 +0000 Yellow-Ear Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=102&title=yellow-ear-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=102&amp;title=yellow-ear-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41yellow_ear_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41yellow_ear_angel.jpg" alt="41yellow_ear_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Apolemichthys xanthotis[/i] Max. size: 20.0 cm SL (male/unsexed), ~8 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 35 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea, Gulf of Aqaba, Gulf of Aden. Biology: Inhabits coral-rich areas. Often in pairs or small groups. Probably feeds on algae, sponges, and benthic invertebrates. Aquarium Care: May nip at Tridacnid clams, stony and soft corals. This species can be aggressive to members of its own species as well as similarly shaped fish. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 02:08:18 +0000 Lemonpeel Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=53&title=lemonpeel-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=53&amp;title=lemonpeel-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Lemonpeel_angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Lemonpeel_angelfish.jpg" alt="41Lemonpeel_angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge flavissima[/i] Common Names: Lemonpeel Angelfish, True Lemonpeel Angelfish Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~5.5 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 50 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Cocos-Keeling Atoll to the Line, Marquesan and Ducie islands (straying to Easter Island), north to the Ryukyus, south to New Caledonia and Rapa; throughout Micronesia. Not reported from Indonesia or Malaysia. Common at most oceanic islands except the Carolines. Not found in Hawaii and Johnston Atoll. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16. Overall color is bright yellow. Juveniles have a characteristic blue-edged black ocellus in the middle of each side. There is a blue circle around the eye and a blue blotch on the posterior margin of the operculum. Median fins are likewise edged blue. With 44 - 50 lateral scale rows. Biology: Occurs in coral rich areas of shallow lagoon and exposed seaward reefs from the lower surge zone to 50 m. Juveniles secretive. Feeds mainly on algae. Live as long as 11 years in captivity. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of live rock to graze upon. This species does nip at Tridacnid clams and LPS. It might eat soft coral polyps and/or nip at zoanthids. The Lemonpeel Angel can become aggressive once it is established, especially to members of the same species, and to other members of the genus. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:38:14 +0000 Japanese Swallow Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=45&title=japanese-swallow-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=45&amp;title=japanese-swallow-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Japanese_swallow.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Japanese_swallow.jpg" alt="41Japanese_swallow.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Genicanthus semifasciatus[/i] Common Names: Japanese Swallow Angelfish, Japanese Swallow Tail Angelfish, Masked Swallowtail Angelfish Max. size: 21.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~8 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 15 - 100 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = southern Japan to Taiwan and northern Philippines. Biology: Inhabits seaward rocky and coral reefs. Hardy aquarium species; takes standard food such as chopped beef, freeze-dried shrimp, mysids, etc. Aquarium Care: Members of this genus do well in reef aquariums, as they do not pose a threat to corals or clams. One drawback is they are seldomly available. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:31:45 +0000 Rock Beauty Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=38&title=rock-beauty-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=38&amp;title=rock-beauty-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Rock_beauty.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Rock_beauty.jpg" alt="41Rock_beauty.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Holacanthus tricolor[/i] Max. size: 35.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~13 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 92 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Atlantic = Georgia (USA), Bermuda, and northern Gulf of Mexico to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-19; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-20. Front of body yellow; remaining parts of body, dorsal fin, and front of anal fin black. Caudal fin entirely yellow. Front margin of anal fin and edge of gill cover orange; bright blue on upper and lower part of iris. The young of about an inch in length are entirely yellow except for a blue-edged black spot on the upper side of the body posterior to the midpoint; with growth the black spot soon expands to become the large black area covering most of the body and dorsal and anal fins . Biology: Inhabits rock jetties, rocky reefs and rich coral areas. Juveniles often associated with fire corals. Feeds on tunicates, sponges, zoantharians and algae. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of &quot;hideaways&quot; in the rock work, as well as established live rock. This species has a low survival rate in captivity, so is not well suited for aquaria. The Rock Beauty Angel will nip at sessile inverts, such as tridacnid clams, and soft &amp; hard corals. This species is very shy and easily over stressed. Placement with its own kind, other Angels, or Triggers, should be avoided. This fish can appear healthy one day, and go downhill the next. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:18 +0000 Royal Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=39&title=royal-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=39&amp;title=royal-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41royal_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41royal_angel.jpg" alt="41royal_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Pygoplites diacanthus[/i] Common Names: Royal Angelfish, Regal Angelfish Max. size: 25.0 cm SL (male/unsexed), ~9 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 48 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa to the Tuamoto Islands, north to Ryukyu and Ogasawara islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-19; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19. Sides with alternating dark-edged bluish white and orange stripes which narrow and angle backward in dorsal fin; posterior portion of dorsal fin black with close-set blue dots; posterior portion of anal fin with alternating yellow and blue bands running parallel to body contour; caudal fin yellow. Juveniles with a large ocellated dark spot on basal portion of the soft dorsal fin. Biology: Occurs in coral rich areas of lagoon and seaward reefs to a depth of 48 m or more. Often found in the vicinity of caves and feeds on sponges and tunicates. Solitary or in pairs, or in groups. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Rarely survives in the aquarium. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of live rock that has plenty of hiding places. The Royal Angelfish will nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, and soft corals. Usually it can be kept with SPS. The species hardiness is dependent on where it is collected. This fish is better suited for an advanced aquarist. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:18 +0000 Queen Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=36&title=queen-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=36&amp;title=queen-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41queen_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41queen_angel.jpg" alt="41queen_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Holacanthus ciliaris[/i] Max. size: 45.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); max. published weight: 1,600 g, ~ 17.7 inches, 3.5 lbs Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 70 m Climate: subtropical Distribution: Western Atlantic = Florida, USA and Gulf of Mexico to Brazil. Also Caribbean, including Antilles and south American coast. Eastern Central Atlantic = St. Paul's Rocks. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-21; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-21. Tail and pectoral fins entirely yellow. Black spot on forehead has electric blue spots and is surrounded by narrow, electric blue ring. Large blue spot at base of pectoral fin. Adults develop short spines on the margin. The color of large adults is purplish blue with yellow-orange rims to the scales; head above eye dark blue, below greenish yellow; mouth, chin, throat, chest and abdomen purplish blue. Biology: Found on coral reefs. Generally occurs solitarily or in pairs. Moves gracefully between seafans, seawhips, and corals. Stomach contents of 26 specimens indicate that the species feeds almost exclusively on sponges supplemented by small amounts of algae, tunicates, hydroids and bryozoans. Young pick ectoparasites from other fishes. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of hiding places. The Queen Angel makes a good beginner Angelfish for someone with a large sized aquarium. This species is aggressive and will pick on members of similar or same species, and newly introduced fish. Should be added last on the livestock list. The Queen Angelfish will nip at most sessile inverts, such as Tridacnid clams and corals. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:17 +0000 Yellowtail Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=37&title=yellowtail-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=37&amp;title=yellowtail-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Yellowtail_angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Yellowtail_angelfish.jpg" alt="41Yellowtail_angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Apolemichthys xanthurus[/i] Common Names: Yellowtail Angelfish, Indian Yellowtail Angelfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~6 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Mauritius to India and Sri Lanka. Morphology: Body pale gray or light brown; black spots on scales larger dorsally, resulting in dark color on upper sides grading to pearly white ventrally. Head dark brown or black; snout lighter; a yellow spot about equal to eye diameter on the temple region. Caudal fin yellow; dorsal and anal fins dark brown to black with white margin; adjacent caudal peduncle region also black. Biology: Inhabits coral-rich areas. Found singly or in pairs. Aquarium Care: This species is great for aquariums, as it readily adjusts to tank life. The Yellowtail Angelfish may nip at sessile inverts, such as Tridacnid clams and corals (soft &amp; stony). This fish can be aggressive to other fish that appear similar in form, and should only be kept one per tank. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:17 +0000 Potter's Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=34&title=potter-27s-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=34&amp;title=potter-27s-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Russet_angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Russet_angelfish.jpg" alt="41Russet_angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge potteri[/i] Common Names: Potter's Angelfish, Russet Angelfish Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~4 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 5 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Johnston and Hawaiian Islands. Morphology: Bright orange with irregular, close-set, thin, vertical black stripes on body, head, and fins; the dorsal, caudal, and anal fins with bright blue margin; the pectoral and pelvic fins orange to bright yellow. Biology: Inhabits rock, coral, or rubble areas of seaward reefs; juveniles occasionally in 5 m. Feeds on algae and detritus. Peak reproductive activity occurs from mid-December through May. Spawns at dusk during the week before full moon. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places in live rock. May nip at Tridacnid clams, zoanthids, LPS, and soft corals. It may act aggressively toward members of the same genus and fish introduced after it's territory is established (especially in smaller sized tanks). A popular species and hardy under appropriate settings. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:16 +0000 Herald's Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=35&title=herald-27s-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=35&amp;title=herald-27s-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41yellow_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41yellow_angel.jpg" alt="41yellow_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge heraldi[/i] Common Names: Herald's Angelfish, Yellow Angelfish, False Lemonpeel Angelfish Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~4 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 90 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Taiwan to the Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17. Overall color is bright yellow to bright yellow orange with a dusky olive patch with yellow spots behind the eye. Biology: Inhabits steep outer reef slopes, occasionally on lagoon reefs. Herbivorous. Forms harems of 2-4 individuals. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Rock work to provide a lot of area to graze. Might nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, zoanthids, possibly soft coral polyps. Usually the Herald's Angelfish is not aggressive toward other fish, unless they are of a related dwarf angel species. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:16 +0000 Vermiculated Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=32&title=vermiculated-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=32&amp;title=vermiculated-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Chmes_u6.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Chmes_u6.jpg" alt="41Chmes_u6.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Chaetodontoplus mesoleucus[/i] Common Names: Vermiculated Angelfish, Singapore Angelfish Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~7 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Japan to Indonesia, Sri Lanka and east to Papua New Guinea. Reported from Mentawai Islands. May consist of two separate species, one with an all-yellow tail and the other mostly gray tail. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Closely resembles a butterflyfish in body shape, but is easily identified as an angelfish by its strong opercular spine. May consist of two separate species, one with an all-yellow tail and the other mostly gray tail. Biology: Inhabits continental shelf reefs; not usually found around oceanic islands. Feeds on sponges, tunicates, and filamentous algae. Forms small groups. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of hiding spaces. The Vermiculated Angelfish may nip at zoanthids, eat soft corals and is risky with LPS. With adequate hiding places, a good diet, and nonagressive fish, the chances of success with this species is increased. Has a butterfly-like appearance. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:09:15 +0000 Multicolor Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=20&title=multicolor-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=20&amp;title=multicolor-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41multicolored_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41multicolored_angel.jpg" alt="41multicolored_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge multicolor[/i] Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~3.5 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 20 - 115 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Palau, Pohnpei and Kosrae in Micronesia, Marshall, Gilbert, Fiji, Cook and Society Islands; strays to Hawaii. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17 Biology: Inhabits steep outer reef slopes, typically in small tracks of rubble between areas of rich coral growth. Cryptic. Herbivorous. Feeds readily in aquaria. Forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Rarely exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of hiding places and live rock to graze on. This is a deep water dwarf dwarf species that requires few tankmates and subdued lighting. If keeping under brighter light, acclimation to the light may be required. Aquascaping can also provide a retreat. May nip at sessile inverts, such as Tridacnid clams, stony and soft corals. The Multicolor Angel can be territorial with members of its species and genus (especially in smaller tanks). mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:47 +0000 Orangeback Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=21&title=orangeback-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=21&amp;title=orangeback-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Ceaca_j0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Ceaca_j0.jpg" alt="41Ceaca_j0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge acanthops[/i] Common Name: Orangeback Angelfish, African Flameback Angelfish, African Pygmy Angelfish Max. size: 8.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~3 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 6 - 40 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Somalia to East London, South Africa. Also around oceanic islands. Common off East Africa. Morphology: Head, upper sides, dorsal, and caudal fins golden yellow; lower two-thirds of the body and the anal fin black with numerous close-set purple spots. Biology: Inhabits areas with coral rubble and frequently occurs in small groups of up to about 10 individuals. Feeds on small invertebrates and algae. Spawns at sunset; male stimulating the emission of eggs with biting motions on female's abdomen; eggs released and abandoned in open water without any particular parental care. Popular aquarium fish in Natal. Occasionally exported from Kenya. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of places to swim and hide. May nip at sessile inverts, such as Tridacnid clams, LPS, and soft coral polyps. This fish, as with other dwarf angels, can be territorial with other fish of its own species, and other dwarf angels. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:47 +0000 Japanese Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=17&title=japanese-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=17&amp;title=japanese-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41japanese_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41japanese_angel.jpg" alt="41japanese_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge interruptus[/i] Common Names: Japanese Angelfish, Japanese Pygmy Angelfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~6 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 12 - 60 m Climate: temperate Distribution: Pacific Ocean = southern and central Japan and the northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Midway and Kure). Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17 Biology: Inhabits rocky and coral reefs Aquarium Care: May nip at LPS, zoanthids, Tridacnid clams, and soft corals. This is a tough dwarf species, and may act aggressively towards members of its own species, and fish of similar shape and/or other fish introduces after it becomes established. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:46 +0000 Gray Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=18&title=gray-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=18&amp;title=gray-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41grey_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41grey_angel.jpg" alt="41grey_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Pomacanthus arcuatus[/i] (Juvenile Pictured Above) Max. size: 60.0 cm TL (male/unsexed, ~23.6 inches; max. published weight: 1,830 g (~4 lbs) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range 2 - 30 m Climate: subtropical Distribution: Western Atlantic = New England, USA to the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Also Bahamas, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean, including Antilles. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 31-33; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 23-25. Pale gray around mouth, and pale gray margin on caudal fin. Inside of pectoral fin yellow. Juveniles are black with two light yellow bars on body and three on head; caudal fin yellow with a vertically elongate, nearly rectangular or hemispherical black spot in middle. Biology: Common in coral reefs, usually solitary, occasionally in pairs. Juveniles are part-time cleaners. Feeds mainly on sponges, but also takes tunicates, algae, zoantharians, gorgonians, hydroids, bryozoans, and seagrasses. Flesh reported to be of excellent quality; marketed fresh and salted. Approaches divers. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: The Gray Angel will nip at sessile inverts, such as Tridacnid clams, soft and stony corals. A handsome and hardy specimen for a larger aquarium. This fish may start off shy, but it won't take long before it becomes bold. The small specimens pick crustacean parasites and dead tissue from their tankmates. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:46 +0000 Mango Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=19&title=mango-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=19&amp;title=mango-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41mango_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41mango_angel.jpg" alt="41mango_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge shepardi[/i] Common Names: Mango Angelfish, Shepard's Pygmy Angelfish, Shepard's Dwarf Angel Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 56 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = known only from the Mariana and Ogasawara Islands; possibly a population southwest of Palau. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Its ground color is variable, ranging from almost red to light apricot. The barring can be reduced to a small patch behind the operculum, and in rare cases, be entirely absent. The blue trim on the soft dorsal and anal fins is absent or reduced in females and highly developed in males. Biology: A common species found singly or in small groups in exposed outer reef slopes and occasionally in clear lagoon reefs. Prefers areas of mixed dead and living corals with numerous shelter holes and passages. Feeds mainly on benthic algae. Forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of live rock to hide. May nip at sessile inverts, such as LPS, soft coral polyps, and clams. Will act aggressively towards members of its species, or fish with similar shape especially when established. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:46 +0000 Golden Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=14&title=golden-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=14&amp;title=golden-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Ceaur_u6.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Ceaur_u6.jpg" alt="41Ceaur_u6.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Centropyge aurantia[/i] Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 60 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = northern Great Barrier Reef to Samoa; including Indonesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Deep bodied. Overall color is red-orange with numerous narrow, vertical, irregular golden lines on the sides. A thin dark line ring the eye. Several dark olive submarginal ones on the median fins. Biology: Found among coral and sponge of seaward reef slopes. Cryptic, seldom seen by divers. Feeds on flake food and brine shrimp. Rarely exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide a large amount of hiding places and well established live rock. May nip at SPS and LPS. Doesn't bother most soft corals (except the possiblity of [i]Xenia[/i]). This fish is great at hiding, which makes it difficult to capture for export. This means that there is a great possiblity that it was captured by using drugs, so the quality of fish available for purchase is varied. Also, there is a lower survival rate in captivity due to the possiblity of cyanide use in capture. This fish should be provided a great deal of hiding places, and live rock for grazing. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:45 +0000 Flame Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=15&title=flame-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=15&amp;title=flame-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41flame_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41flame_angel.jpg" alt="41flame_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Centropyge loricula Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine; depth range 15 - 60 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean = mainly in tropical waters. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Bright orange-red with a vertical elongate black blotch and 4 - 5 bars on the sides; posterior part of the dorsal and anal fins with alternating short purple-blue and black bands. Specimens from the Marquesas lack the vertical black bars. Biology: Found in clear lagoon and seaward reefs from the lower surge zone to a depth of 57 m. Secretive and stays near shelter. Has been reared in captivity. Feeds on algae. Forms harems of 3-7 individuals. Frequently exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: As with other members of this genus, the Flame Angel might nip at Tridacnid clams, zoanthids, and LPS. Also, the Flame Angel may eat soft coral polyps. A popular species, however, more recently this Angel hs had poor survivability beyone a month or so (poss. due to collecting and shipping issues). Choose the individual wisely. Very bright and flashy, this species can be aggressive toward members of Centropyge genus, as well as fish of similar shape and/or behavior. Last fish introduced in a peaceful community is recommended. Provide live rock for good grazing opportunities. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:45 +0000 French Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=16&title=french-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=16&amp;title=french-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41french_angel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41french_angel.jpg" alt="41french_angel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pomacanthus paru Max. size: 41.1 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine ; depth range 3 - 100 m Climate: subtropical Distribution: Western Atlantic = Florida, USA and Bahamas to Brazil. Also Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, including Antilles. Eastern Atlantic = off Ascension Island and St. Paul's Rocks. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 29-31; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22-24. Black, the scales of the body, except those at front from nape to abdomen, rimmed with golden yellow; a broad orange-yellow bar at pectoral absent; dorsal filament yellow; chin whitish; outer part of iris yellow; eye narrowly rimmed below with blue Biology: Common in shallow reefs. Usually in pairs, often near sea fans. Feed on sponges, algae, bryozoans, zoantharians, gorgonians and tunicates. Spawning pairs are strongly territorial, with usually both members vigorously defending their areas against neighboring pairs. Juveniles tend cleaning stations where they service a broad range of clients, including jacks, snappers, morays, grunts, surgeonfishes, and wrasses. At the station the cleaner displays a fluttering swimming and when cleaning it touches the clients with its pelvic fins. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: A pretty hardy fish for larger aquariums. Smaller juveniles sometimes will not take to captivity. The adults become large and will act agressively. <br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:45 +0000 Peppermint Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=12&title=peppermint-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=12&amp;title=peppermint-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41Peppermint_angelfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41Peppermint_angelfish.jpg" alt="41Peppermint_angelfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracentropyge boylei Max. size: 7.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~2.7 inches Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 53 - 120 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Biology: Found in ledges, caves, and rubble areas of steep seaward reefs. Never or rarely exported through the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Because this is a deep water species, care must be taken to create a similar environment. This fish is rarely seen in the hobby. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 17:43:44 +0000