Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Mon, 22 Oct 2018 21:25:41 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 moorish idol http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1032&title=moorish-idol&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1032&amp;title=moorish-idol&amp;cat=502"><img title="006.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/006.JPG" alt="006.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance ecobalance Fri, 20 Jul 2007 07:43:01 +0000 Hybrid fish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=843&title=hybrid-fish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=843&amp;title=hybrid-fish&amp;cat=502"><img title="picshow_90_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/picshow_90_.jpg" alt="picshow_90_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Mon, 10 Oct 2005 10:53:12 +0000 Big Longnose Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=784&title=big-longnose-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=784&amp;title=big-longnose-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450Folon_u3.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450Folon_u3.jpg" alt="450Folon_u3.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Forcipiger longirostris Common Names: Big Longnose Butterflyfish, Longnose Butterflyfish Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 70 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Hawaiian, Marquesan, and Pitcairn islands, north to the Bonin [=Ogasawara] Islands, south to New Caledonia and the Austral Islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10-11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-20. Snout extremely long. Rare uniformly black color phase. Biology: A generally uncommon species that inhabits seaward reefs to depths greater than 60 m. Feeds mainly on whole organisms such as small crustaceans. Usually seen in pairs. Sometimes dark brown instead of yellow. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of live rock for a good population of natural prey (i.e. amphipods). This species requires food with a small particulate size, as the mouth is tiny. Best kept one to a system, except in a male-female pair. The Longnose Butterfly will fight with other butterflyfish, especially F. flavissimus (Yellow Longnose Butterflyfish). Provide a varied diet including fine meaty foods, crustaceans, mysid shrimp, and frozen preparations (thawed). The variety will keep the fish healthy. <br /><br />2 comments NaH2O Sat, 08 Jan 2005 03:57:58 +0000 Blackback Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=783&title=blackback-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=783&amp;title=blackback-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450C_melannotus_RP_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450C_melannotus_RP_.jpg" alt="450C_melannotus_RP_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon melannotus Common Names: Blackback Butterflyfish, Blackbacked (Black-backed) Butterflyfish, Melannotus Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 4 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18-21; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-18. Changes color when frightened or when observed at night. The dorsal portion of the body turns black except for two white patches. Biology: Usually solitary or in pairs in coral-rich areas of reef flats, lagoons, and seaward reefs to a depth of over 15 m. Juveniles inshore. In pairs or traveling in small groups. Feeds on octocorallian and scleractinian coral polyps. Easy to maintain in the aquarium. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of swimming space and hiding places. This species acclimates well to captivity, and will accept a variety of aquarium foods. The Blackback Butterfly will chase members of the same and similar species, but is rarely aggressive to other members of the family. It has a bold temperment and best if kept one to a tank. Will nip at stony corals and eat soft corals. A varied diet should be offered, as well as vitamin-enriched and color enhancing food to maintain the bright coloration. Photo Courtesy of ©Robert A. Patzner NaH2O Sat, 08 Jan 2005 01:51:04 +0000 Vagabond Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=782&title=vagabond-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=782&amp;title=vagabond-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450Vagabond-Butterfly_RP_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450Vagabond-Butterfly_RP_.jpg" alt="450Vagabond-Butterfly_RP_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon vagabundus Common Names: Vagabond Butterflyfish, Crisscross Butterflyfish Max. size: 23.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa to the Line and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Lord Howe and the Austral islands. Closely related to Chaetodon decussatus. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-25; Anal spines: 2-3; Anal soft rays: 19-22. Black bands over head and tail. Biology: Found in reef flats, lagoon and seaward reefs and sometimes in turbid waters subject to freshwater runoff. Swim in pairs. Omnivorous, feed on algae, coral polyps, crustaceans and worms. Oviparous. Hardly territorial and often accompanies other species without being aggressive. Easily maintained in tanks. Aquarium Care: Provide with a good amount of swimming room. Will eat stony corals and many soft corals, nip at the bases and tentacles of stinging anemones, and pick mushroom anemones. This species is a hardier butterflyfish, and will accept a wide range of captive foods. Vitamin-enriched foods should help to sustain the intense coloration. It can be kept in pairs, and with fish of the same or similar species. One reference did indicate this species has a poor survivability, however, all others indicated this is a hardy species. Therefore, each specimen should be studied for health, and kept in a well maintained system to increase survivability. Photo Courtesy of ©Robert A. Patzner NaH2O Fri, 07 Jan 2005 05:56:44 +0000 Melon Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=781&title=melon-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=781&amp;title=melon-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450Melon-Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450Melon-Butterfly.jpg" alt="450Melon-Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon trifasciatus Common Names: Melon Butterflyfish, Indian Ocean Redfin Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Hawaiian and Tuamoto islands. However, the Pacific population has been recognized as a distinct subspecies (Chaetodon trifasciatus lunulatus Quoy &amp; Gaimard, 1825) by Burgess while according to Randall, pers. comm. 1995, Chaetodon trifasciatus occurs only in the Indian Ocean, while Chaetodon lunulatus occurs only in the Pacific. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-21. Distinguished by the orange caudal peduncle. Tip of caudal fin is transparent. Biology: Occur in coral-rich lagoons and semi-protected seaward reefs. Territorial and aggressive to other Chaetodon. Small juveniles secretive in corals. Swim in pairs. Feed exclusively on coral polyps, particularly of the Pocillopora type. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: This species feeds mainly on coral polyps (including Acropora spp.). It will also eat the occasional copepod and filamentous algae. The Melon Butterflyfish has poor survivability in the captive environment. Photo Courtesy of ©Robert A. Patzner NaH2O Fri, 07 Jan 2005 04:41:56 +0000 Spot-Tail Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=780&title=spot-tail-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=780&amp;title=spot-tail-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450Spot-tail-Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450Spot-tail-Butterfly.jpg" alt="450Spot-tail-Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon ocellicaudus Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 15 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Central Pacific = Malaysia to New Guinea, north to the Philippines; Palau (Belau) in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-20; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Nearly identical to C. melanotus, differing only in the shape of the black mark on the caudal peduncle, in lacking a black mark on the chest, and in having 14 rather than 15 modal pectoral fin rays. n juvenile spottail butterflyfish the spot at the base of the caudal fin can be larger, extending from the top to the bottom of the caudal peduncle, and may be mistaken for the band-like marking of the blackbacked butterflyfish. Biology: Occurs in coral rich areas of reef flats, lagoons, and seaward reefs. Juveniles inshore. Adults usually seen in pair. Feeds on soft coral polyps (e.g. Litophyton viridis and species of the genera Sarcophyton, Nephthia, and Clavularia). Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of swimming space and hiding spots. This species may nip at stony corals and eat soft corals. The Spot-Tail Butterflyfish may act aggressively towards fish of the same species or of similar coloration. NaH2O Fri, 07 Jan 2005 01:01:26 +0000 Margined Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=779&title=margined-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=779&amp;title=margined-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450C_marginalis.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450C_marginalis.jpg" alt="450C_marginalis.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chelmon marginalis Common Names: Margined Butterflyfish, Margined Coralfish, Marginalis Copperband Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific =northern Australia (from Western Australia to the Great Barrier Reef) and Papua New Guinea. Closely resembles Chelmon rostratus (Copperband Butterflyfish). Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9-10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 29-33; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 21-22. Juveniles have a posterior bar and dorsal fin spot which fade and disappear with growth. Biology: Inhabits coastal reefs. Usually solitary. Aquarium Care: Sometimes available in the hobby, and hardier than some Chelmon spp. This fish probably feeds on polychaetes worms, sea urchin tube feet and small crustaceans, but exact feeding habits are somewhat lacking. Will likely eat Aiptasia spp. anemones. Some specimens may nip at LPS, some soft corals and zoanthids. Resembles Chelmon rostratus, except (in adults) it lacks the middle body bar/stripe and the dot fades with age. NaH2O Wed, 05 Jan 2005 05:20:56 +0000 Dot-and-Dash Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=778&title=dot-and-dash-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=778&amp;title=dot-and-dash-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="450DotandDashButterflyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/450DotandDashButterflyfish.jpg" alt="450DotandDashButterflyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon pelewensis Common Names: Dot-and-Dash Butterflyfish, Sunset Butterflyfish Max. size: 12.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Australia to Fiji, Samoa, Tuamoto Archipelago and the Society Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Body is pale tan with oblique rows of black spots, becoming solid bands on the upper half of the body. A dark-edged orange bar runs vertically on the head through the eye. Orange caudal peduncle. Biology: Feeds mainly on coral polyps and small benthic invertebrates. Usually paired. Adults pair, but juveniles solitary. Adapts itself easily to tank life and willingly accepts nearly all kinds of food offered. Aquarium Care: This species has a small mouth and should be offered foods that are finely chopped. Smaller individuals may even have difficulty eating adult brine shrimp. It is not a reef suitable fish, as it will feed on coral polyps. It may, however, be able to live with stinging anemones and mushroom anemones. It can be kept with other butterflyfish (even same species), but they should be introduced at the same time. The Chaetodon pelewensis is similar to Chaetodon punctatofasciatus, but its stripes are at a slant (C. punctatofasciatus has vertical stripes), and the former is not as hardy as the latter. NaH2O Wed, 05 Jan 2005 01:44:11 +0000 Black Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=311&title=black-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=311&amp;title=black-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Black_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Black_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Black_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon flavirostris Common Names: Black Butterflyfish, Flavirostris Butterfly, Yellow-Faced Butterflyfish Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Great Barrier Reef, New South Wales, Australia, Lord Howe Island, to New Caledonia, Fiji, Samoa, the Cook, Rapa and Pitcairn Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-21. Overall color is blackish with broad rim of yellow on dorsal caudal and anal fins. The snout is yellow with white tips. A black bump is on the forehead. Larger black butterflyfish are much more spectacular in color than juveniles or adolescents. Small juveniles have a black stripe through the eye, a black spot on the posterior part of the dorsal fin, no or little orange on the face and yellow ventral fins. Biology: Found in coral rich to algae-covered rocky areas of lagoon and seaward reefs including estuarine areas. Usually paired. Omnivorous and feeds on algae, coral, and small benthic invertebrates. Maintaining this species in captivity is difficult. Aquarium Care: Very poor success rate in the hobby, this species is shy and often non-feeding. May have a better survival rate with experienced/advanced aquarists and an ideal aquarium setting. This fish feeds on coral polyps, algae, and small invertebrates in the wild, and may require an identical environment for success. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:11:16 +0000 Blackburn's Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=310&title=blackburn-27s-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=310&amp;title=blackburn-27s-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chbla_j0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chbla_j0.jpg" alt="41Chbla_j0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon blackburnii Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 30 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Kenya to about 33°S, Madagascar, and Mauritius. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 16; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21-23; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18 Biology: Inhabits outer reef slopes with moderate coral growth. Aquarium Care: Not commonly seen in the aquarium hobby. It is thought that this species feeds on small crustaceans and worms, although one food habit study suggested that they feed primarily on soft coral polyps. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:05:30 +0000 Dotted Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=308&title=dotted-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=308&amp;title=dotted-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Dotted_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Dotted_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Dotted_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon semeion Max. size: 26.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Maldives to the Tuamoto Islands, north to Ryukyu Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-22. The abdominal region of females is noticeably thick set. Body is golden yellow; base of the posterior portions of the dorsal and anal fins black; a prominent vertical black bar running across the eye; diagonal rows of black dots on the sides. A filament originating from the soft portions of the dorsal fin rays trails posteriorly (the long filament is prominent in adults). Biology: Uncommon species found in coral rich areas of clear water lagoon and semi-protected seaward reefs. Usually in pairs or small groups, more wary than most species. Minimum depth reported taken from. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: A delicate and sensitive species that is occasionally offered in the hobby. Food habits have not been studied, however, it is suggested that this species is not an obligatory coral eater. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:48:45 +0000 Eastern Triangular Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=307&title=eastern-triangular-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=307&amp;title=eastern-triangular-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Eastren_Triangular.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Eastren_Triangular.jpg" alt="41Eastren_Triangular.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon baronessa Common Names: Eastern Triangular Butterflyfish, Baroness Butterflyfish Max. size: 16.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 20 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Cocos-Keeling Islands and Indonesia to Fiji, north to southern Japan, south to New Caledonia; Palau and Yap in Micronesia; Australia-Guinea region (Great Barrier Reef) and throughout Melanesia, also along the north coast of New South Wales. Replaced by Chaetodon triangulum in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 11-12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-22. The sides are with a pattern of alternating cream and grey-brown to purplish chevron-shaped narrow bars. Three dark bars on the head, including one running across the eye. Biology: Occur in lagoon and seaward reefs. Feed exclusively on the polyps of the tubular Acropora corals. Swim in pairs and are territorial. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: A poor choice for the hobby, as they require a strict diet of coral polyps that is difficult (if not impossible) to replicate in the closed environment. In the wild they feed on table corals and neatly nip off the polyps. On a very rare occasion, a juvenile specimen can be taught to eat captive foods. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:45:56 +0000 Falcula Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=306&title=falcula-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=306&amp;title=falcula-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Facula_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Facula_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Facula_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon falcula Common Name: Falcula Butterflyfish, Saddleback Butterflyfish Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 15 m Distribution: Indian Ocean = East Africa south to 27°S and east to Indonesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-21. Distinctly marked with bright yellow and orange over the back and tail. Two well-defined black saddles on the back. Biology: Found on the reef edge and upper slope. Usually in current-prone habitats; juveniles secretive in corals. Feed mainly on invertebrates. Generally seen in pairs or in small aggregations. Aquarium Care: This species will pick at sea and mushroom anemones, as well as stony corals. Small individuals may be safe with soft corals, however, they will be more destructive the larger they grow. The Falcula Butterfly is one of the favorite species among hobbyists, and is more duable than related species. Some individuals might not feed on captive foods, but it is possible to get those specimens to feed by offering inexpensive anemones to pick at. Acclimated specimens will compete for food. Feed a variety of meaty fare foods, and frozen preparations. The Chaetodon falcula closely resembles Chaetodon ulietensis. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:37:53 +0000 Golden-Striped Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=305&title=golden-striped-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=305&amp;title=golden-striped-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Golden_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Golden_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Golden_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon aureofasciatus Common Names: Golden-Striped Butterflyfish, Golden Butterflyfish Max. size: 12.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine; depth range 5 - 15 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = northern Australia, from Western Australia to the Great Barrier Reef; New Guinea and perhaps further into Melanesia. Very closely related to Chaetodon rainfordi and the two species are sympatric over part of their ranges. The Golden-Striped Butterflyfish is common on coastal reefs, often in the vicinity of estuaries and lagoon reefs. It is most common among staghorn coral (Acropora spp.) or on reefs composed of both macroalgae and hard coral. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18; Vertebrae: 24. Body nearly circular. Preopercle obtuse-angled, smooth to finely serrate. Eye diameter is greater than snout length. Dorsal and anal fins strongly and equally rounded and do not appear confluent with caudal fin. Pelvic fins long, extending as far as second anal fin spine base. Juveniles similar in shape to adults. Axillary scale present. Color: Eyebands join at nape and extend to chest as two indistinct lines, the anterior lines again joined. Indistinct dark bordered light stripe in interorbital. Biology: Inhabits coastal and inner reefs; juveniles among branching corals. Solitary or paired Aquarium Care: This species is a very poor choice for the closed system, as it is an obligate stony coral feeder. The feeding requirements to keep this fish sustained would be very difficult to meet. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:30:26 +0000 Mitratus Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=304&title=mitratus-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=304&amp;title=mitratus-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Mitratus_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Mitratus_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Mitratus_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon mitratus Common Names: Mitratus Butterflyfish, Indian Butterflyfish Max. size: 14.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 30 - 70 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = known only from Mauritius, Reunion, Madagascar, Amirante, Christmas Island, and Cocos-Keeling Atoll south of Sumatra. Probably widely distributed around the islands of the tropical Indian Ocean. Biology: Not much is known of this deep-dwelling butterfly, but recent observations indicate that it can form small groups of up to 5 individuals and inhabits steep outer reef drop-offs in rubble areas or among growths of black coral and sea fans. Aquarium Care: This is a deep water species best kept in a dimly lit tank, or acclimated to higher lighting provided caves/shelter. This is a hard to find, bold and hardy species. Will eat a variety of sessile invertebrates, including tube worms, gorgonian and coral polyps. It may also feed on zooplankton. An interesting note, this species has been seen swimming upside down with bellies pointed at the cave ceiling. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:24:31 +0000 Lemon Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=303&title=lemon-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=303&amp;title=lemon-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Lemon_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Lemon_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Lemon_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon miliaris Common Names: Lemon Butterflyfish, Milletseed Butterflyfish Max. size: 13.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 250 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Johnston Island and Hawaii. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-23; Anal spines: 2-3; Anal soft rays: 17-20. Body is generally yellow or white with vertical rows of spots on the sides. A broad black bar runs vertically through eye from edge of sub opercle, and a black spot is on the caudal peduncle. Biology: Inhabit shallow reef flats. Form schools at midwater to feed on plankton and benthic invertebrates. Also on shallow seamounts. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of swimming room and tankmates that are not aggressive. In the wild this species feeds mainly on a diet of copepods, but it also eats salps, amphipods, larvaceans, fish eggs, ostracods and mysid shrimps on occasion. It will occasionally pick at LPS. The Lemon Butterfly is relatively easy to keep and is a beginner suited butterflyfish. It will meast captive foods, and should be offered a variety. Can be kept singly, paired, or in small groups (as long as introduced together). This is a peaceful fish, and won't bother other fish of same or similar species. The bright yellow color of the Lemon Butterflyfish will fade in captivity, but a vitamin-enriched diet and/or color enhancing foods may help. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:13:51 +0000 Marquesan Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=301&title=marquesan-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=301&amp;title=marquesan-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41MARQUESAN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41MARQUESAN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" alt="41MARQUESAN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon declivis Common Names: Marquesan Butterflyfish, Declivis Butterflyfish Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean = Christmas Island. Eastern Central Pacific: Line and Marquesan islands. Biology: Found over rocky and sandy bottoms. Because of its limited distribution and deep dwelling habits, it will probably remain unknown in the aquarium trade. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock and hiding places. This species is a rare/occasional import that's in high demand. It is readily adaptable and will accept captive foods. The Marquesan Butterflyfish is a peaceful and shy fish, that would do well with non aggressive tankmates. Will eat coral polyps, feather dusters and anemones. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 18:06:03 +0000 Multiband Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=300&title=multiband-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=300&amp;title=multiband-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Multibanded_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Multibanded_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Multibanded_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon multicinctus Common Names: Multiband Butterflyfish, Pebbled Butterflyfish Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 30 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-20 Biology: Feeds mainly on coral polyps, also polychaete worms and small shrimps. Usually seen in pairs. Aquarium Care: Will eat coral polyps. This species is sometimes regarded as hardy, while others claim it is not, depending on acclimation to captive foods. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:56:00 +0000 Muller's Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=299&title=muller-27s-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=299&amp;title=muller-27s-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chmue_u3.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chmue_u3.jpg" alt="41Chmue_u3.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chelmon muelleri Common Names: Muller's Butterflyfish, Muller's Coralfish, Mulleri Butterflyfish, Blackfin Coralfish Max. size: 20.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine Distribution: Western Pacific = found exclusively on coastal reefs and estuaries of Queensland. Recently recorded from northwestern Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9-10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-30; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-21 Biology: Prefers algae covered and mud bottoms areas of estuaries and coastal reefs. Usually occur in pairs. Feeds on small benthic invertebrates. Aquarium Care: Sometimes available in the hobby, and sought after by rare butterfly collectors. Will likely eat Aiptasia spp. anemones. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:53:29 +0000 Ornate Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=298&title=ornate-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=298&amp;title=ornate-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chorn_u5.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chorn_u5.jpg" alt="41Chorn_u5.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon ornatissimus Common Names: Ornate Butterflyfish, Clown Butterflyfish Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 36 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Sri Lanka to the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Ducie islands, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe and Rapa Islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-23. Body is white with orange to orange-brown oblique bands on the sides. Two broad yellow-edged black bars are on the head; one running across the eye and another on the snout. Biology: Occur in clear waters and coral-rich areas of lagoon and seaward reefs. However, it is only common in seaward reefs. Juveniles are solitary, living among branching corals, while adults are almost always in pairs and are home-ranging. Feed exclusively on coral tissue. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: A poor choice for the hobby, as they require a strict diet of coral polyps that is difficult (if not impossible) to replicate in the closed environment. On a very rare occasion, a juvenile specimen can be taught to eat captive foods. This species is doomed in captivity. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:46:31 +0000 Doublesaddle Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=297&title=doublesaddle-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=297&amp;title=doublesaddle-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Pacific_Double_Saddle_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Pacific_Double_Saddle_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Pacific_Double_Saddle_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon ulietensis Common Names: Pacific Doublesaddle Butterflyfish, False Falcula Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Cocos-Keeling Islands to the Tuamoto Islands, north to Japan. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-25; Anal spines: 3-4; Anal soft rays: 19-21. Easily recognized on color and distinguished from sibling by white color between the black saddles. Biology: Occur in coral-rich areas of lagoon reefs and less commonly in seaward reefs. Juveniles in harbors and estuaries. Usually solitary, in pairs or in small groups. Feed on plant and animal material. Oviparous. Can be easily maintained in tanks. Aquarium Care: Provide with hiding places and peaceful tankmates. This species can initially be shy, but once acclimated it will eat a majority of the foods offered, and become an aggressive feeder. Will eat corals (stony and mushroom), anemones, and tubeworms. Can be kept same or similar species, provided a large enough aquarium. Resembles Chaetodon falcula. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:40:26 +0000 Pacific Redfin Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=296&title=pacific-redfin-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=296&amp;title=pacific-redfin-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41PACIFIC_REDFIN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41PACIFIC_REDFIN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" alt="41PACIFIC_REDFIN_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon lunulatus Common Names: Pacific Redfin Butterflyfish, Oval Butterflyfish Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Pacific = widespread from Japan and Australia to the Tuamoto Islands and Hawaii. Replaced by Chaetodon trifasciatus in the Indian Ocean. The two species differ in their color pattern (C. trifasciatus has blue on its sides, an orange bar at the base of the tail, etc.), and, on rare occasions, they will form heterospecific pairs where their distributions overlap (i.e., Bali). Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-21. Distinguished by grey caudal peduncle. Biology: Occurs in monogamous pairs in coastal coral-rich areas. Juveniles hide among branches of small corals, often in lagoons. Feeds solely on live corals. Aquarium Care: A poor choice for the hobby, as they require a strict diet of coral polyps that is difficult (if not impossible) to replicate in the closed environment. On a very rare occasion, a juvenile specimen can be taught to eat captive foods. This species is doomed in captivity. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:38:01 +0000 Panda Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=295&title=panda-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=295&amp;title=panda-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Panda_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Panda_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Panda_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon adiergastos Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 25 m Distribution: Western Pacific = Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, Indonesia, and Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-21. Body color is white with diagonal brown stripes on the sides. The dorsal, caudal anal and pelvic fins are yellow. A broad black band is on the face, covering the eye. A black isolated spot is on the forehead. Biology: Inhabit coral reefs and occurs in pairs or groups, usually near soft coral. Juveniles solitary and found on shallow protected reefs or in estuaries. Have never been imported although they can be easily maintained in a tank. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: This species is a very poor choice for aquariums, as the survivability is extremely low. The Panda Butterflyfish feeds on coral polyps and other invertebrates. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:35:23 +0000 Redback Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=294&title=redback-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=294&amp;title=redback-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41REDBACK_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41REDBACK_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" alt="41REDBACK_BUTTERFLYFISH.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon paucifasciatus Common Names: Redback Butterflyfish, Red Sea Chevron Butterflyfish, Paucifasciatus Butterflyfish, Red Sea Pearlscale Butterfly Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Biology: Found over coral and rubble areas, in pairs or in small groups. This species is a member of the &quot;xanthurus-complex&quot;, being most similar to the Yellowtail Butterflyfish (Chaetodon xanthurus) and the Madagascar Butterflyfish (C. madagascariensis). It differs in having both red on the posterior portion of the body and median fins and a black spot on the head that is outlined in white. Feeds on coral polyps, gorgonians, algae, polychaete worms and small crustaceans. This attractive fish does well in aquarium surroundings and therefore highly prized by hobbyists. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock to provide hiding places and grazing. Can be aggressive towards members of their own and similar species. They do the best in a peaceful setting with non aggressive tankmates. Feed a variety of foods including a dried seaweed, Spirulina based foods, and vitamin enriched brine and mysis shrimp, as well as finely chopped meaty foods. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:26:15 +0000 Reef Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=293&title=reef-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=293&amp;title=reef-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Reef_Butterflu.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Reef_Butterflu.jpg" alt="41Reef_Butterflu.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon sedentarius Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 92 m Climate: subtropical Distribution: Western Atlantic = North Carolina, USA to northern South America, including the eastern Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19. Edges of the scales yellowish on back; a black bar on head through eye; a broad blackish bar across caudal peduncle which extends into soft portions of dorsal fin above and anal fin below; caudal fin light yellow, white at base. Juveniles have a black spot on the posterior part of the dorsal fin. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs. Off the coast of North Carolina it prefers areas of moderate relief, at depths between 52 to 98 m (172 to 323 feet). In the northern Gulf of Mexico it is most abundant at depths from 50 to 80 m (165 to 264 feet) among massive demosponges and coralline algae. In the Caribbean it is often found at depths in excess of 30 m (98 feet), amid gorgonian forests. Often in pairs. Prefers to feed on eggs of Abudefduf saxatilis but also on polychaete worms, shrimps, amphipods and hydroids. Aquarium Care: A healthy specimen will do well in captivity. Omnivore. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:23:26 +0000 Reticulated Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=292&title=reticulated-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=292&amp;title=reticulated-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Reticulated_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Reticulated_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Reticulated_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Chaetodon reticulatus Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Ryukyu Islands to the Great Barrier Reef and the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Ducie islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-29; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-22. Body is generally black with a broad white vertical band extending from the pelvic to the origin of the dorsal spines. There are several horizontal rows of white spots on the sides. Juveniles similar to adults but white area proportionally large. Biology: Relatively common on exposed seaward reefs; occasionally on shallow lagoon reefs in areas of rich coral growth and clear water. Juveniles in protected coral areas. In pairs in Indonesia but schools in some Pacific locations. Often in pairs and feed mainly on scleractinian coral polyps. Easily approached. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Very poor survivability in the hobby. This species is coral polyp eater, and the diet is extremely difficult to replicate in captive systems. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:19:44 +0000 Speckled Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=291&title=speckled-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=291&amp;title=speckled-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chcit_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chcit_u0.jpg" alt="41Chcit_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon citrinellus Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 36 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan and the Ogasawara Islands, south to New South Wales (Australia) and Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-17. Pale yellow with numerous small dark spots. Black bar over head and black margin on anal fin. Biology: Common in shallow exposed reef flats, lagoons, and seaward reefs; in relatively open areas with scattered corals and occasionally at depth of 36 m. Usually in pairs. Juveniles often in small aggregations and commonly mix with other similar sized juveniles, especially C. kleinii. Feed on small worms, small benthic invertebrates, coral polyps, and filamentous algae. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: This species is aggressive in the wild, and has a medium survivability. As with other Butterflyfish, chances of success are increased with a healthy specimen that readily accepts food in an established system. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:06:56 +0000 Spotbanded Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=290&title=spotbanded-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=290&amp;title=spotbanded-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Spotbanded_Butterfy.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Spotbanded_Butterfy.jpg" alt="41Spotbanded_Butterfy.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon punctatofasciatus Common Names: Spotbanded Butterflyfish, Punctato Butterflyfish, Spot-band Butterflyfish, Dot Dash Butterflyfish Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 45 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean to the Line Islands, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to Rowley Shoals and the northern Great Barrier Reef; throughout Micronesia. Replaced by Chaetodon guttatissimus in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18. Overall color is brownish yellow with vertical rows of spots forming bands on the upper portions of the sides. A black-edged orange bar runs across the eye. The posterior edge of the caudal fin is transparent. Caudal peduncle is bright orange. Biology: Common in coral rich areas and clear waters of lagoon and seaward reefs. Sometimes found on outer subtidal reef flats. Juveniles secretive. Feed on filamentous algae, corals, and benthic invertebrates. Often in pairs. Occasionally hybridize with C. pelewensis in the southern part of its range. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock to hide and graze. This species can be shy when first introduced, and does better when kept with peaceful tankmates. The Spotbanded Butterfly is not suitable for a reef tank, as it eats most invetebrates, although ignores mushroom and stinging anemones. It will accept most captive foods, and the diet of this species should contain: marine or Spirulina algae and finely chopped meaty foods. Because of the small mouth, the particle size of food is important. It will have difficulty eating larger pieces of food, which includes adult brine shrimp. The Spotbanded Butterfly can be kept in pairs or with other butterflyfish in larger aquariums. Similar to C. pelewensis, however the C. punctatofasciatus has vertical body bars (C. pelewensis has slanting bars). mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:59:43 +0000 Spotfin Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=289&title=spotfin-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=289&amp;title=spotfin-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Spotfin_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Spotfin_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Spotfin_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon ocellatus Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 30 m Distribution: Western Atlantic = Florida, USA to Brazil. Also Bahamas, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, including Antilles . Larvae are sometimes swept northward which accounts for the sighting of juvenile specimens as far north as Massachusetts, USA during summer months. One record (one specimen, 3 cm) from Musquodoboit Harbor, Nova Scotia, Canada. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18-21; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 15-17. Body is white with a black bar running across the head through the eye. In juveniles, a second black bar runs from the base of the soft portion of the dorsal fin to the base of the anal fin. The dorsal, caudal and anal fins are either yellow or transparent. A narrow yellow bar from gill opening to pectoral base. Biology: Inhabits shallow, coral reefs with clear water. Develops dusky bands at night. Generally common. Aquarium Care: This species has very poor survivability in the hobby. Its diet consists of polychaete worm tentacles (i.e. spaghetti worms, fan worms), small crustaceans, eggs, and stony coral polyps. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:50:43 +0000 Three-Stripe Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=288&title=three-stripe-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=288&amp;title=three-stripe-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Three_Strip_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Three_Strip_butterfly.jpg" alt="41Three_Strip_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon tricinctus Common Names: Three-Stripe Butterflyfish, Threeband Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 15 m Distribution: Southwest Pacific = Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-18 Biology: Inhabits coral rich areas of lagoon and seaward reefs. Occurs in small groups. Relatively unknown to American and European aquarists because this species has only been rarely imported. Aquarium Care: Not much is known to date on captive care of this species to give good recommendations. The only feeding behavior noted is it nibbles on coral polyps. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:38:34 +0000 Tinker's Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=287&title=tinker-27s-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=287&amp;title=tinker-27s-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Tinker_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Tinker_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Tinker_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon tinkeri Common Names: Tinker's Butterflyfish, Hawaiian Butterflyfish, Tinkerii Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 27 - 135 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean = formerly known to be endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. Recorded from Johnston Island and the Marshall Islands. Replaced by Chaetodon declivis in the Line and Marquesan Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16-17. Differs from C. flavocoronatus by lacking a broad yellow band on the nape. Biology: Often found in the vicinity of steep slopes, solitary or in pairs and occasionally in small aggregations. Feeds on a variety of planktonic and benthic organisms. High-priced aquarium export. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of hiding places. This species is a deep reef fish that does best in a dimly lit tank, but can be acclimated to higher light levels if provided shelter. Some suggest keeping this species in a lower temperature environment in the range of 21-24ºC (70-75ºF). The Tinker's Butterflyfish will eat tubeworms and may nip polyps on LPS, some soft corals and gorgonians. It will accept captive foods, provided a well maintained aquarium. The Tinker's Butterfly is bold, and will spend time out in the open. Usually, not aggressive, but may fight with the same or similar species. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:32:27 +0000 Triangular Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=286&title=triangular-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=286&amp;title=triangular-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Triangular_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Triangular_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Triangular_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon triangulum Common Names: Triangular Butterflyfish, Rummynose Butterflyfish Max. size: 16.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 25 m Distribution: Indian Ocean = Madagascar to the Andaman Sea and western sector of the Indonesian Archipelago. Morphology: Deep-bodied and black triangle in caudal fin. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs. Closely associated with Acropora corals, particularly the staghorn variety. Territorial and in pairs. Juvenile solitary among coral branches. Feeds mainly on coral polyps and therefore does not adjust easily to aquarium conditions. Aquarium Care: This species has a specialized diet that is extremely difficult to simulate in the captive environment. The Triangular Butterflyfish feeds mainly on coral polyps (specifically Acropora spp.). Because of this dependence, they have very poor survivability. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:30:02 +0000 White Face Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=284&title=white-face-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=284&amp;title=white-face-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Whiteface_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Whiteface_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Whiteface_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon mesoleucos Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 20 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs and usually seen in pairs. Aquarium Care: This species is rarely seen in the hobby, however, does have a good survivability in captivity. It can be aggressive towards other Butterflyfishes. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:22:01 +0000 Weibles Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=283&title=weibles-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=283&amp;title=weibles-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Weibels_Butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Weibels_Butterfly.jpg" alt="41Weibels_Butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon wiebeli Max. size: 19.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 25 m Distribution: Western Pacific =Japan to Thailand; including the Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, the South China Sea, and the Gulf of Thailand. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-20. Head somewhat like C. lunula but the body is bright yellow and the caudal fin is marked with a broad black band, offset by white in front . Biology: Occur in rocky and coral reef areas, where they are found in pairs and small groups. Feed on algae. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: This species is very rare in the hobby, and is medium on the survivability scale. Chances are increased with a healthy fish, an established well maintained system, and fed a varied diet. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:17:45 +0000 Yellow-Dotted Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=282&title=yellow-dotted-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=282&amp;title=yellow-dotted-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Yellow_Dotted_Buttefly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Yellow_Dotted_Buttefly.jpg" alt="41Yellow_Dotted_Buttefly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon selene Max. size: 16.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 8 - 50 m Distribution: Western Pacific = a poorly known species which has been recorded from West New Guinea, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan, and Japan. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-19. Series of yellow dots, running at diagonal lines over the sides. A black band extending from caudal peduncle along bases of dorsal and anal fins. Biology: Inhabit coastal reefs, primarily on rubble slopes. Oviparous. Adults usually swim in pairs in search of small benthic invertebrates. Aquarium Care: This species is rated as medium on the survivability scale. The survivability will increase if a younger, healthy specimen is introduced into a well maintained aquarium, and fed a varied diet. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:15:14 +0000 Yellowhead Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=281&title=yellowhead-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=281&amp;title=yellowhead-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Yellowhead_Butteryfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Yellowhead_Butteryfly.jpg" alt="41Yellowhead_Butteryfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon xanthocephalus Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated, with rich coral growth, but is also reported from algae-covered rocky reefs; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m; Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = East Africa to Sri Lanka and the Maldives. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 21-23; The adults of this species are gray overall with a yellow &quot;face,&quot; a thin yellow line along the gill cover and thin bluish gray lines on the body. Both the soft portions of the dorsal and anal fins are orangish yellow to olive in color. Juveniles of this species are white overall with a black eye bar, a black spot on the caudal peduncle and black patch on the posterior portion of the dorsal fin. Biology: Hybrids with C. ephippium known. Usually solitary, but may form loose shoals of 5-6 individuals and usually found around isolated coral heads. Territorial and aggressive to other chaetodonts; omnivorous. Aquarium Care: This species has medium survivability in the captive environment. The Yellowhead Butterfly is closely related to C. ephippium, but not as adaptable. Should be kept by experienced butterfly hobbyists. Feeding information is lacking on this species, however, it is reported to eat, in part, on stony coral polyps. It also eats filamentous algae. This species can be aggressive and territorial. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 16:10:31 +0000 Sunburst Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=96&title=sunburst-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=96&amp;title=sunburst-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41sunburst_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41sunburst_butterfly.jpg" alt="41sunburst_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon kleinii Common Names: Sunburst Butterflyfish, Klein's Butterflyfish, Brown Butterflyfish, Corallicola Butterflyfish, Blacklip Butterflyfish, Orange Butterflyfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 61 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa (south to Coffee Bay, South Africa, to the Hawaiian Islands and Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to New South Wales, Australia and New Caledonia. Throughout Micronesia; also reported from Galapagos Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-23; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-20; Vertebrae: 24. Body is yellowish brown with two broad white vertical bars running across the body one from near the origin of the dorsal spine and the other from the middle of the back. A black bar runs vertically across the eye. There are numerous dotted horizontal stripes on the sides. The margin of caudal fin is transparent. Biology: Occur in deeper lagoons and channels, and seaward reefs. Occur singly or in pairs. Common, omnivorous individuals that feed mainly on soft coral polyps (mainly on Sarcophyton tracheliophorum and Litophyton viridis), algae and zooplankton. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of hiding places (can be shy). This species makes an excellent choice for a beginning aquarist, as it is a durable member of the family. It will accept almost any captive foods, once it has acclimated to aquarium life. It can be kept in a reef, if it is well fed, and corals are carefully chosen. They do the best with more noxious soft corals, but will eat leather coral polyps. The Sunburst Butterfly can also be housed with fish of the same and similar species, as long as they are introduced together. Feed a varied diet to maintain coloration and health. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 02:02:45 +0000 Teardrop Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=97&title=teardrop-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=97&amp;title=teardrop-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41teardrop_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41teardrop_butterfly.jpg" alt="41teardrop_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon unimaculatus Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa (south to Port Alfred, South Africa, to the Hawaiian, Marquesan, and Ducie islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Lord Howe and Rapa islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-23; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-20. Easily identified by the color pattern of yellow, white and black. Caudal fin is transparent. Juveniles are virtually identical to adults in coloration. Biology: Occur in small groups in reef flats, clear lagoon and seaward reefs. Feed on soft and hard corals, also on polychaetes, small crustaceans, and filamentous algae. In Indonesia, usually seen at moderate depths, usually swimming in small groups. Adults are mainly in depth 20-60 m. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Will eat corals, anemones, mushroom anemones, and even pick at crustaceans. This species will accept most captive foods, and is a moderately hardy fish. Careful handling of this fish in capture and shipping will increase the hobbyists success, as does keeping in a tank with filamentous algae. The C. unimaculatus can be kept with fish of the same or similar species in larger aquariums. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 02:02:45 +0000 Crochet Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=85&title=crochet-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=85&amp;title=crochet-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chgue_u2.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chgue_u2.jpg" alt="41Chgue_u2.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon guentheri Common Names: Crochet Butterflyfish, Guenther's Butterflyfish Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 40 m Distribution: Western Pacific = anti-equatorial, from southern Japan to Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands and from Papua New Guinea and the Great Barrier Reef to Lord Howe Island and New South Wales. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18. Pearly white with numerous small spots, some forming vertical patterns, and yellow to orange from dorsal fin to anal fin. Biology: Inhabit seaward reefs in areas with rich coral growth. Usually solitary, but also a schooling species that is often on the move, usually in areas prone to strong currents. Usually deep in Indonesia and adults are rarely found in less than 40 m depth. Mainly found in sponge zones and deep water occurrence is habitat related, not cold water as sometimes suggested. This species will travel in open water and cleans large pelagic fishes. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: This species does well in captivity. Provide a well maintained system, and a varied diet. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:35:22 +0000 Yellow Longnose Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=86&title=yellow-longnose-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=86&amp;title=yellow-longnose-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Longnose_butterflyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Longnose_butterflyfish.jpg" alt="41Longnose_butterflyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Forcipiger flavissimus Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 114 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa to the Hawaiian and Easter islands, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island; throughout Micronesia. Eastern Pacific = southern Baja California, Mexico and from the Revillagigedo and Galapagos Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19. F. flavissimus has relatively shorter snout with a larger mouth, higher dorsal spine count, and absence of dark-centered scales on the thorax than F. longirostris. Biology: Common in exposed seaward reefs but also found in lagoon reefs. Solitary or in small groups of up to 5 individuals. Adults usually in pairs. Feeds on a wide variety of animal prey including hydroids, fish eggs, small crustaceans but prefers tube feet of echinoderms, pedicilaria of sea urchins, and polychaete tentacles. Second most important export in Hawaii. Aquarium Care: Will eat tubeworms, nip at sea urchin tubefeet, and some reports in the wild of eating stony and soft corals (however, most cases indicate corals are ignored). A hardy fish that acclimates well to captive life, and usually begins to feed shortly after introduction. Will act aggressively to members of the same or similar species. Does best in a peaceful tank, but can be kept with moderately aggressive tankmates (if F. flavissimus is first in the tank). The Yellow Longnose Butterflyfish will point its dorsal spines toward a harassing aggressor. Best if kept one per tank. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:35:22 +0000 Bluecheek Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=78&title=bluecheek-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=78&amp;title=bluecheek-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Bluecheek_butterflyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Bluecheek_butterflyfish.jpg" alt="41Bluecheek_butterflyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon semilarvatus Common Names: Bluecheek Butterflyfish, Golden Butterflyfish, Semilarvatus Butterflyfish, Blue Mask Butterflyfish Max. size: 23.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 20 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. Biology: A common species found in areas where there is rich coral growth. Often seen in pairs or small aggregations. Occasionally observed hovering in a stationary position for extended periods under ledges of Acropora plate corals. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of swimming space and peaceful tankmates. This species can be a bold and a hardy addition. Best success is with a healthy younger specimen, as they acclimate more readily and are more likely to accept captive foods. In the wild, this fish feeds on soft and stony coral polyps, however, sometimes it can be kept with [i]Sinularia[/i] spp.. The Bluecheek Butterflyfish can be kept in pairs or small groups in larger tanks. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:26:58 +0000 Blueblotch Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=79&title=blueblotch-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=79&amp;title=blueblotch-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41blueblotch_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41blueblotch_butterfly.jpg" alt="41blueblotch_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon plebeius Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 10 m Distribution: Western Pacific = Andaman Sea to Fiji, north to Japan, south to Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 4-5; Anal soft rays: 36-41. Body is yellow with narrow dark stripes on the sides. There is an elongate blue blotch on the upper sides and a white-edged black spot on the caudal peduncle. A white-edged black bar runs vertically on the head across the eye. Biology: Feed mainly on polyps of Acropora corals in lagoons and outer reefs. Usually in pairs. Oviparous. Juveniles have been observed to clean parasites from other fishes. Aquarium Care: Will eat stony coral polyps, and may be alright with some soft corals. This species does not do well in aquaria. Some sources say it is easy to keep and will accept substitute foods, but the majority do not recommend this fish in captivity. It is a very difficut fish to feed, as its main food source is Acropora corals. Vitamin-enriched live brine shrimp, clam on a half shell, or mashed up squid or shrimp on a coral skeleton, may entice an individual to eat. Once feeding, a variety should be offered in order to keep the fish healthy. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:26:58 +0000 Bluelashed Butteflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=80&title=bluelashed-butteflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=80&amp;title=bluelashed-butteflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Chben_u4.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Chben_u4.jpg" alt="41Chben_u4.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon bennetti Common Names: Bluelashed Butterflyfish, Bennett's Butterflyfish Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Pitcairn Group, north to Japan, south to Lord Howe and Rapa islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14-16. Body yellow and large black blotch with blue circle on sides. Juveniles appear to be very similar in coloration to the adults except for the white outline of the black spot which disappears as the fish increases in size. Biology: Occur in lagoon and seaward reefs in areas with rich coral growth. Juveniles may be found in shallow Acropora thickets. Adults occur in pair. Omnivorous. Feed on coral polyps. Oviparous. This species is extremely difficult to maintain in an aquarium and is very rarely imported. Aquarium Care: A poor choice for the hobby, as they require a strict diet of coral polyps that is difficult (if not impossible) to replicate in the closed environment. On a very rare occasion, a juvenile specimen can be taught to eat captive foods. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 19:26:58 +0000 Redtail Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=67&title=redtail-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=67&amp;title=redtail-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41redtail_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41redtail_butterfly.jpg" alt="41redtail_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon collare Common Names: Redtail Butterflyfish, Collare Butterflyfish, Pakistan Butterflyfish Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 15 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = Persian Gulf and Maldives to Japan, the Philippines and Indonesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-22. Recognized by the red on the tail that is green in juvenile C. auripes. Biology: Occur in coral reefs in pairs or several aggregations. Juveniles in estuaries. Commonly exported to Europe and America, but quite difficult to acclimate to aquarium conditions. Feed on coral polyps. Usually found on reef edge and upper slope. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of swimming space. Will nip at sessile inverts growing on live rock, and eat stony corals. This species can be kept with some soft corals. The Redtail Butterflyfish will do well in captivity. Proper selection, acclimation, and a well maintained system will increase success. Some specimens won't eat for several days when first introduced, and smaller specimens sometimes are more difficult to feed vs. medium sized fish (over 8cm). Keep one per tank, as they will be aggressive with members of their own species. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:54 +0000 Saddled Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=68&title=saddled-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=68&amp;title=saddled-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41saddle_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41saddle_butterfly.jpg" alt="41saddle_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon ephippium Common Names: Saddled Butterflyfish, Saddle Butterflyfish, Saddleback Butterflyfish Max. size: 30.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Cocos-Keeling Islands to the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Rowley Shoals and New South Wales, Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20-23. Overall color is yellowish grey with a large black spot bordered below by a broad white band on the back, and wavy blue lines on the lower sides. Adults have a filament extending posteriorly from the upper part of the soft portion of the dorsal fin. Biology: Occur in lagoons and seaward reefs to a depth of 30 m, prefers coral-rich and clear water areas. Encountered singly, in pairs or small groups (adults often in pairs; juveniles solitary and inshore). Feed on filamentous algae, small invertebrates, coral polyps, and fish eggs. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of swimming space, well-maintained water, and filamentous algae growth. Will nip at inverts growing on live rock, and will eat stony corals. This species can be kept with some soft corals. The Saddled Butterflyfish varies in suitability depending on size/age of the individual specimen (larger ones do better than medium sized ones, better than smaller ones - provided swim space and good water quality). Keep one per tank, unless male-female pair. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:54 +0000 Rainfordi Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=65&title=rainfordi-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=65&amp;title=rainfordi-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41rainfordi_butterfly.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41rainfordi_butterfly.jpg" alt="41rainfordi_butterfly.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon rainfordi Common Names: Rainfordi Butterflyfish, Rainford's Butterfly Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 15 m Distribution: Western Pacific = restricted to the Great Barrier Reef, adjacent coastal areas, and Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10-11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 20-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 17-19 Biology: Usually in pairs, in areas of sparse coral growth. Feeds on algae and small benthic invertebrates. Heavy algae growth should always be maintained in the aquarium. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock and high water quality. This species does poorly in the tank environment, and should only be attempted by the most experienced aquarists. It has a difficult time adjusting to a captive diet. It might be willing to try a coral skeleton coated with mashed meats. This species does better when kept with non-aggressive tankmates. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:53 +0000 Red Sea Bannerfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=66&title=red-sea-bannerfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=66&amp;title=red-sea-bannerfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Red_Sea_bannerfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Red_Sea_bannerfish.jpg" alt="41Red_Sea_bannerfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Heniochus intermedius Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 50 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Biology: Found on coral slopes Juveniles in large groups at base of reef, sometimes with H. diphreutes; adults usually solitary or paired, occasionally in groups. Feeds on zooplankton and benthic invertebrates. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock and hiding places. This species may nip at stony corals, and is an eager feeder. In the wild it feeds most frequently on zooplankton, but also consumes some benthic prey, including polychaete worm tentacles, stony-coral polyps, shrimps, and ascidians. If keeping more than one specimen, add simultaneously. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:53 +0000 Threadfin Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=62&title=threadfin-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=62&amp;title=threadfin-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Threadfin_butterflyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Threadfin_butterflyfish.jpg" alt="41Threadfin_butterflyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chaetodon auriga Common Names: Threadfin Butterflyfish, Auriga Butterflyfish Max. size: 23.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 35 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea and East Africa (extending to Mossel Bay, South Africa to the Hawaiian, Marquesan, and Ducie islands, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe and Rapa islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12-13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-21. There is a pattern of &quot;chevron&quot; markings on the sides and a prominent black spot at the posterior edge of the soft portion of the dorsal fin. Adults of this species have a prominent black vertical band running across the eye, and a filament trailing posteriorly from the upper soft portion of the dorsal fin. Juveniles with a black bar over the head that hides the eye and an eye-sized black spot on the soft dorsal fin. Biology: May be seen in a variety of habitats ranging from rich coral reefs to weedy and rubble covered areas. Maybe found singly, in pairs, and in aggregations that roam over large distances in search of food. Feed mainly by tearing pieces from polychaetes, sea anemones, coral polyps, and algae. Oviparous. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of live rock. This species will eat a variety of invertebrates (i.e. coral polyps, crustaceans, worms, etc), and algae. The Threadfin Butterflyfish is an excellent choice. It will accept a wide range of captive foods, and, in order to keep health and coloration, a variety of foods is best. This species is a more hostile member of the butterfly family, and will chase fish of the same species (and other fish with similar shape, size, and coloration). Add more than one individual at the same time. Best to choose specimens that have been at the dealer for a week or two, and that are in the size range of 3 - 5 inches. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:52 +0000 Pyramid Butterflyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=63&title=pyramid-butterflyfish&cat=502 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=63&amp;title=pyramid-butterflyfish&amp;cat=502"><img title="41Pyramid_butterflyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/502/thumbs/41Pyramid_butterflyfish.jpg" alt="41Pyramid_butterflyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Hemitaurichthys polylepis Max. size: 18.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 40 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean to Indonesia to and the Hawaiian, Line, and Pitcairn Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Rowley Shoals and New Caledonia; throughout Micronesia. Replaced by Hemitaurichthys zoster in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-21. Readily identified by unusual coloration. Biology: Occurs in large schools that may extend several meters above the edges of steep current-swept outer reef slopes. Common. Feeds on plankton. Aquarium Care: Provide with plenty of swimming room. This fish is not a threat to sessile invertebrates, and will accept a varety of foods (including mysid shrimp, brine shrimp, finely chopped seafood, frozen preparations). If the aquarium is of a larger size, this species can be housed in pairs or small groups. Acclimates better when tankmates are non-aggressive. Once established, however, moderately aggressive fish can be introduced. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:42:52 +0000