Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Sat, 20 Jan 2018 16:31:15 -0600 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 Powderbrown Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1105&title=powderbrown-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1105&amp;title=powderbrown-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="chicobrown.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/chicobrown.jpg" alt="chicobrown.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: skrimplover skrimplover Wed, 23 Jan 2008 10:42:34 -0600 Bristletooth Tomini Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1001&title=bristletooth-tomini-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1001&amp;title=bristletooth-tomini-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="100_4633.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/100_4633.jpg" alt="100_4633.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: The Apprentice<br /><br />Description: The Bristletooth Tomini Tang, also known as the Tomini Surgeonfish is tan combined with yellow, blue, and white highlights as a juvenile. When mature, the body color solidifies, the tail becomes blue, and the dorsal and anal fins are tipped with a golden-yellow hue. The area above the eyes has small golden flecks while sporting a golden half circle beneath. Its distribution Ranges from Indo-Australian: Bali and Sulawesi (Indonesia), Solomon Is., and Palau. This current one came from Guadalcanal. They get a maximum lenght of 6&quot; The Apprentice Thu, 21 Dec 2006 17:02:18 -0600 Acanthurus tennenti &quot;Lieutenant Tang&quot; http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=995&title=acanthurus-tennenti26quot-3blieutenant-tang-26quot-3b&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=995&amp;title=acanthurus-tennenti26quot-3blieutenant-tang-26quot-3b&amp;cat=503"><img title="100_3675.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/100_3675.JPG" alt="100_3675.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: The Apprentice<br /><br />Description: 31.0 cm TL (male/unsexed;aprox) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 – 110 feet Climate: tropical; 24 – 28°C Importance: fisheries: commercial; aquarium: commercial Resilience: High, minimum population doubling time less than 15 months(Preliminary K or Fecundity.) Distribution: Gazetteer Indian Ocean: East Africa to Sri Lanka and the Lesser Sunda Islands of southern Indonesia. The Red Sea record by Dor (1984, Ref. 2198) is an error. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9 - 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23 - 24; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22 – 23. Brown in color, specimens up to 12 cm SL with black horseshoe mark on shoulder region breaking into 2 horizontal curved bands in larger specimens; caudal spine surrounded by a black area which is then surrounded by a bluish white area; caudal fin with a white posterior border The Apprentice Fri, 24 Nov 2006 08:39:48 -0600 Pacific Blue Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=993&title=pacific-blue-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=993&amp;title=pacific-blue-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="DSC01047_Small_.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/DSC01047_Small_.JPG" alt="DSC01047_Small_.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ronj<br /><br />Description: hippo tang ronj Sun, 05 Nov 2006 18:17:11 -0600 Powder Blue Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=936&title=powder-blue-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=936&amp;title=powder-blue-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="Powderblue.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/Powderblue.jpg" alt="Powderblue.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: shallowreef<br /><br />Description: Powder Blue Tang shallowreef Fri, 15 Sep 2006 08:40:37 -0500 Yellow Belly Blue Hippo Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=896&title=yellow-belly-blue-hippo-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=896&amp;title=yellow-belly-blue-hippo-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="DSC_2613a_1_1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/DSC_2613a_1_1.jpg" alt="DSC_2613a_1_1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: TrooperVinny TrooperVinny Fri, 24 Mar 2006 23:25:30 -0600 powder blue tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=831&title=powder-blue-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=831&amp;title=powder-blue-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="MVC-040F.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/MVC-040F.JPG" alt="MVC-040F.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: msk454 msk454 Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:22:45 -0500 Sailfin Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=811&title=sailfin-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=811&amp;title=sailfin-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="217Tang_January_resize.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/217Tang_January_resize.jpg" alt="217Tang_January_resize.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: BlennyBabe<br /><br />Description: This guy rules my three hundred gallon. Hes a huge pig. <br /><br />1 comment BlennyBabe Sat, 22 Jan 2005 17:41:39 -0600 Vlamingi Tand http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=809&title=vlamingi-tand&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=809&amp;title=vlamingi-tand&amp;cat=503"><img title="1854Navla_u8.jpeg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/1854Navla_u8.jpeg" alt="1854Navla_u8.jpeg" /></a><br /><br />by: edgerat<br /><br />Description: Family: Acanthuridae (Surgeonfishes, tangs, unicornfishes) , subfamily: Nasinae picture (Navla_u8.jpg) by Patzner, R. Map Order: Perciformes (perch-likes) Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) FishBase name: Bignose unicornfish Max. size: 60.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; Ref. 3145) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 50 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C; 30°N - 25°S Importance: aquarium: commercial Resilience: Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (K=0.264; Tmax=45) Distribution: Gazetteer Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Line, Marquesan and Tuamoto islands; north to southern Japan, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 27-29. Adults develop a convexly rounded prominent snout and unusually tall dorsal and anal fins. Side of body with vertical blue lines which break up into small blue spots dorsally and ventrally. A broad blue band extending from eye to front of rostral protuberance (Ref 9808). Biology: Occurs in deep lagoon and seaward reefs. Forms mid-water aggregations off steep slopes during the day to feed on zooplankton. Usually found alone or in pairs. Omnivorous. Has the ability to show or hide its blue markings (Ref. 9710). Minimum depth reported taken from Ref. 27115. Red List Status: Not in IUCN Red List , (Ref. 36508) Dangerous: harmless <br /><br />3 comments edgerat Wed, 19 Jan 2005 23:42:43 -0600 Clown Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=807&title=clown-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=807&amp;title=clown-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="450clowntangrp.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/450clowntangrp.jpg" alt="450clowntangrp.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus lineatus Common Names: Clown Tang, Clown Surgeonfish, Lined Surgeonfish Max. size: 38.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 24 - 30°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: eastern Africa to the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia; throughout Micronesia. Replaced by the closely related Acanthurus sohal in the Red Sea. Society, Mascarene and Line islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27-30; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 25-28. Upper 3/4 of body with alternating black-edged blue and yellow bands; lower 1/4 of body gray. Erectile spine on each side of caudal peduncle is sharp, strong, forward-pointing, and venomous. Upper part of head with yellow, oblique stripes. Pectoral fins pale with dusky rays; pelvic fins light yellowish brown with black outer margin; vertical markings in caudal fin. Gill rakers 14-16 anterior row, 13-15 posterior row. Minute scales. Philippine specimens demonstrate different color patterns. Biology: A territorial species, which is common in surge zones of exposed seaward reefs. The large males control well-defined feeding territories and harems of females. The species is almost continually in motion. Herbivorous but also feeds on crustaceans. The venomous caudal spine can cause painful wounds. Form spawning aggregations. Aquarium Care: This species is one of the more aggressive of Surgeonfish. Its caudal peduncle spine is larger than almost all Surgeonfish, and will use it. Except in a huge tank, avoid keeping with other family members, even so, add with caution. The Clown Tang will attack other species with a similar shape and/or food habits. It requires unobstructed swimming space, and good water quality. This species browses on larger filamentous algaes and small fleshy macroalgaes. On occasion, an underfed specimen may nip at LPS. Feed a varied diet, consisting of vegetative matter. Dried and frozen herbivore foods that conatin marine algae and Spirulina. Supplement with items such as dried seaweed (sushi Nori). Photo Courtesy of ©Robert A. Patzner <br /><br />2 comments NaH2O Wed, 19 Jan 2005 13:06:36 -0600 Kole's Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=806&title=kole-27s-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=806&amp;title=kole-27s-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="450Kole_Tang-medCM.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/450Kole_Tang-medCM.jpg" alt="450Kole_Tang-medCM.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ctenochaetus strigosus Common Names: Kole's Tang, Yelloweye Kole Tang, Yelloweye Surgeonfish, Yelloweye Bristletooth, Spotted Surgeonfish Max. size: 14.6 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 113 m Climate: tropical; 21 - 27°C Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22-25. C. strigosus differs from C. striatus by having a more truncate tail and a pale yellowish ring around the eye. Yellow on edge of orbit broad and conspicuous (pale in preservative), especially posteriorly. Small spots on head blue, not extending onto anterior body or chest. Posterior gill rakers 30-36. Biology: Solitary. Mainly diurnal. Feeds on detritus by whisking its comb-like teeth over the bottom as it closes its mouth. Aquarium Care: This species is noted as not overly aggressive, and usually won't bother tankmates, with the exception of closely related species. Members of the same species will battle each other, and it is best to keep one per tank. May be picked on by more aggressive Tangs. The Kole Tang does best when provided an aquarium with a healthy growth of microalgae to meet its constant grazing needs. Feed a varied diet, including mostly vegetative matter such as dried maringe algae, frozen herbivore rations, Spirulina. Photo Courtesy of ©Craig Manoukian <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Wed, 19 Jan 2005 12:57:57 -0600 Chevron Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=564&title=chevron-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=564&amp;title=chevron-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="450chevrontang_CF_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/450chevrontang_CF_.jpg" alt="450chevrontang_CF_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ctenochaetus hawaiiensis Common Names: Chevron Tang, Black Surgeonfish Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 25 - 27°C Distribution: Pacific Ocean =throughout most Oceania, from the Hawaiian Islands and Pitcairn Island. To the islands of Micronesia. Society and Austral Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27-29; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 25-26. Gill rakers on anterior row 21-25, on posterior row 25. Juveniles differ greatly from adults. They have deeper bodies and are bright orange-red with numerous dark chevrons. Adults appear uniformly black from a distance but actually have numerous dark green horizontal pinstripes. Biology: An uncommon species that inhabits seaward rocky or coral reefs. Juveniles found in relatively deep coral rich areas. Aquarium Care: Plenty of live rock to graze on. The juvenile has a blue herringbone pattern with an orange background and matures into a dark olive-brown color with thin lines on the body. Not terribly aggressive and will coexist with other fish, excpet the same or similar species. One per tank. The Chevron tang is likely to be picked on by other tangs. Photo Courtesy of Charles Fiterman <br /><br />3 comments NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 22:24:01 -0600 Red Sea Sailfin Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=563&title=red-sea-sailfin-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=563&amp;title=red-sea-sailfin-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="450RedSeaSailfin_CF_.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/450RedSeaSailfin_CF_.jpg" alt="450RedSeaSailfin_CF_.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Zebrasoma desjardinii Common Names: Red Sea Sailfin Tang, Indian Ocean Sailfin Tang Max. size: 40.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical Distribution: Indian Ocean = Red Sea south to Natal, South Africa and east to India, Java, and Cocos-Keeling Islands, but not Christmas Island. Biology: Found in lagoon and seaward reefs to depths greater then 30 m; juveniles in sheltered inner reef areas. Aquarium Care: Browses on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgaes. Least aggressive of the family, however, it may be aggressive with members of its species. Keep only one per tank, unless in a very large aquarium. Photo Courtesy of Charles Fiterman <br /><br />1 comment NaH2O Thu, 30 Dec 2004 22:08:55 -0600 Purple Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=377&title=purple-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=377&amp;title=purple-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="410-01-03_purple_tang_21.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/410-01-03_purple_tang_21.jpg" alt="410-01-03_purple_tang_21.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: MtnDewMan<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Zebrasoma xanthurum Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 20 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea to the Persian Gulf; recorded from Maldives. Biology: Often found in groups in coral-rich areas or on rocky bottoms. It small and numerous pharyngeal teeth suggest a diet that consists mainly of filamentous algae. Aquarium Care: Feed a good herbivorous diet. This fish is the most hostile of the Zebrasoma genus. It should be the last fish introduced in a community tank, unless kept with other large hostile species. Grazes on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgaes. Photo Courtesy of Charles Fiterman <br /><br />2 comments MtnDewMan Mon, 27 Dec 2004 21:18:30 -0600 Whitecheek Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=99&title=whitecheek-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=99&amp;title=whitecheek-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41white_cheek_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41white_cheek_tang.jpg" alt="41white_cheek_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus nigricans Common Names: Whitecheek Surgeonfish/Tang. Sometimes labelled as: Powder Brown, Gold Rimmed Tang Max. size: 21.3 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 67 m Climate: tropical; 21 - 29°C Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean = known only from Cocos-Keeling Islands and Christmas Island. Pacific Ocean = Ryukyu Islands and Great Barrier Reef to the Hawaiian Islands and French Polynesia (excluding Rapa). This species has crossed the Eastern Pacific Barrier to the Revillagigedo Islands, Cocos Island, Galapagos Islands, and the coast of Mexico. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 28-31; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 26-28. A horizontally elongate white spot directly below eye. No orange band in outer part of dorsal fin. Caudal peduncle black except for yellow edge of socket and sheath of peduncular spine. Base of pectoral fin black. Gill rakers on anterior row:17-19, on posterior row:18-20. Biology: Inhabits hard substrate areas of clear lagoon and seaward reefs from the lower surge zone to at least 67 m and feeds on filamentous algae. A territorial species. Common throughout Micronesia and hybridizes with the rare A. achilles. Size of metamorphosis from the postlarva stage to juvenile is 5.5 to 6 cm Aquarium Care: Lots of hiding places for when it feels threatened. Grazes on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgae. Can be shy at first. One per tank, except in large aquariums. After it is established, some will act aggressively to fish competing for food introduced later on, and other tangs. This species is very similar to [i]A. japonicus[/i] (which has a much larger white patch under the eye), but not as hardy. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:08:17 -0600 Yellow Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=100&title=yellow-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=100&amp;title=yellow-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41yellow_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41yellow_tang.jpg" alt="41yellow_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Zebrasoma flavescens Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 46 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Ryukyu, Mariana, Marshall, Marcus, Wake and Hawaiian islands. Has been reported off the coast of Florida in the Western Central Atlantic. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 5; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-22. bright yellow overall (pale in preservative). Sheath of peduncular spine white. Body very deep, its depth 1.4 to 1.75 times in SL. Snout moderately protruding. Mouth small; teeth spatulate, close-set, the edges denticulate. 12 upper and 14 lower teeth in juveniles, and 18 upper and 22 lower teeth in an adult 15 cm SL. Biology: Inhabits coral-rich areas of lagoon and seaward reefs from below the surge zone to about 46 m. Occurs singly or in loose groups and browses on filamentous algae. A popular aquarium fish and the top marine fish export from Hawaii. Group spawning and pair-spawning by territorial males that court passing females were observed. Aquarium Care: Very popular species in the hobby. The Yellow Tang can be quite aggressive once it is established (especially in a smaller sized tank). The yellow color may begin to fade if not fed an adequate diet for active herbivores. Keep only one per tank, unless in a large system (at least 135 gallons), and introduced together. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:08:17 -0600 Sailfin Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=93&title=sailfin-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=93&amp;title=sailfin-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41redsea_sailfin_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41redsea_sailfin_tang.jpg" alt="41redsea_sailfin_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Zebrasoma veliferum Common Names: Sailfin Tang, Pacific Sailfin Tang Max. size: 40.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Indonesia to the Hawaiian and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, and Rapa Island; throughout Micronesia. Replaced by the similar Zebrasoma desjardinii in the Indian Ocean. Also known in Line, Society, Austral and Rapa islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 4-5; Dorsal soft rays (total): 29-33; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 23-26. Smalls juveniles have alternating yellow and black bars. No brush-like patch of setae posteriorly on side of body. Dorsal fin very elevated, the longest ray 2.1 to 2.5 times in SL. Biology: Occurs in lagoon and seaward reefs from the lower surge zone to a depth of at least 30 m. Solitary juveniles found among rocks or coral of shallow protected, sometimes turbid reefs. Feeds on leafy macroalgae. It possesses, fewer and larger pharyngeal teeth, compared to the other Zebrasoma spp.. The species is never poisonous. Aquarium Care: It is the least aggressive member of the [i]Zebrasoma[/i] genus. It may, however, act aggressively to members of its own species. The coloration on the Sailfin Tang will fade if not fed an adequate diet of vegetative matter. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:02:44 -0600 Sohal Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=95&title=sohal-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=95&amp;title=sohal-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41sohol_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41sohol_tang.jpg" alt="41sohol_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus sohal Max. size: 40.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 24 - 30°C Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea to the Persian Gulf. Biology: A common species found in seaward edges of reefs exposed to surge. Aggressive and territorial. Feeds on various kinds of algae, mainly Sargassum, and fine filamentous green algae. Caught with nets. Aquarium Care: Extremely territorial, especially with other tangs (fights can be fatal). <br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:02:44 -0600 Powder Blue Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=90&title=powder-blue-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=90&amp;title=powder-blue-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41powderblue_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41powderblue_tang.jpg" alt="41powderblue_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus leucosternon Max. size: 54.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 25 m Climate: tropical; 23 - 28°C Distribution: Indian Ocean = eastern Africa to the Andaman Sea, southwest Indonesia and Christmas Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 28-30; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 23-26. Blue with a white chest. Head black with a broad white band from pectoral-fin base to throat. No distinct white spot or broad white band below eye. Dorsal fin yellow (except white margin and black submarginal line). Anal and pelvic fins white. Biology: Inhabits shallow, clear coastal and island coral reefs. Usually found on reef flats and along upper seaward slopes. May occur singly or in large feeding aggregations. Feeds on benthic algae; on small, sparsely scattered algae and small growths in crevices. Aquarium Care: This species is prone to ich, common in the family, but more common in this particular species. Aggressive to other tangs, especially those of similar shape and coloration. Should be only tang in tank, unless a very large aquarium. Males are smaller than females. <br /><br />3 comments mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:02:43 -0600 Twospot Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=91&title=twospot-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=91&amp;title=twospot-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41twinspot_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41twinspot_tang.jpg" alt="41twinspot_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ctenochaetus binotatus Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 8 - 53 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Tuamoto Islands; southern Japan to central New South Wales (Australia) and New Caledonia. Not known from the Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, the Gulf, the Hawaiian Islands, Marquesas, Rapa, Pitcairn Islands, and Easter Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22-25. Prominent black spot at the rear base of dorsal and anal fins; adults with a bluish ring around the eye. Dorsal and anal fins dark brown. Caudal fin brown in adults, yellow in young. Edge of lips smooth. Upper teeth usually with 5 denticulations (not including tip). Anterior gill rakers 23-29. Biology: Inhabits coral and rubble areas of deep lagoon and seaward reefs. Feeds by scooping film of detritus and unicellular algae (e.g. dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus) that produce ciguatera toxin making this species a key link in the ciguatera food chain. Aquarium Care: Plenty of live rock to graze on, and a healthy growth of microalgae. Not an overly aggressive fish, and usually won't bother tankmates, except similar species (more likely to be picked on by other tangs). One per tank. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 20:02:43 -0600 Naso Elegans Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=88&title=naso-elegans-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=88&amp;title=naso-elegans-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41naso_elegans.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41naso_elegans.jpg" alt="41naso_elegans.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Naso elegans Max. size: 45.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical Distribution: Indian Ocean = Red Sea south to Durban, South Africa and east through the islands of the western Indian Ocean to southwestern Indonesia, at least to Bali. Not reported from the Gulf of Oman, Persian Gulf, or India. Previously considered the Indian Ocean color variant of Naso lituratus. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-30; Anal spines: 2; Anal soft rays: 27-30. Dorsal fin yellow with a blue line at base and a black band above this; anal and pelvic fins dark brown; dorsal and anal fins with a narrow blue margin and black submarginal line; caudal fin yellowish with black upper and lower margins and a submarginal black band posteriorly. Caudal fin emarginate with adult males having trailing filaments from each corner. Biology: Feeds on benthic algae Aquarium Care: Usually not aggressive unless the fish is the same or similar species. Grazes on macroalgae. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:23 -0600 Naso Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=89&title=naso-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=89&amp;title=naso-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Naso_lituratus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Naso_lituratus.jpg" alt="41Naso_lituratus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Naso lituratus Common Names: Naso Tang, Orangespine Unicornfish, Naso Lituratus Tang/Surgeonfish Max. size: 46.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 0 - 90 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Honshu, Japan south to the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia; east in Oceania to the Hawaiian Islands, all the islands of French Polynesia, and the Pitcairn Islands. In the eastern Pacific, from Clipperton Island. Once regarded a wide-ranging Indo-Pacific species, the Indian Ocean population is now recognized as a separate species, Naso elegans. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6; Dorsal soft rays (total): 28-31; Anal spines: 2; Anal soft rays: 29-31. Dorsal fin black, the black continuing as a pointed projection onto nape, with a pale blue line at base and a broad outer white zone on soft portion; anal fin mainly orange; dorsal and anal fins with a narrow blue margin and black submarginal line; caudal fin with a yellow submarginal band posteriorly. Caudal fin emarginate with adult males having trailing filaments from each corner. Biology: Found in areas of coral, rock, or rubble of lagoon and seaward reefs. Feeds mainly on leafy brown algae (Sargassum and Dictyota). Sometimes in large aggregations. The species is very seldom poisonous. Pair-spawning has been observed. Aquarium Care: Plenty of swimming room and hiding spots. For the most part, this species isn't aggressive to tankmates, unless they are the same or similar species. The erect spines can cause deep wounds and are easily entangled in a net. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:23 -0600 Hippo Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=84&title=hippo-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=84&amp;title=hippo-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Pahep_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Pahep_u0.jpg" alt="41Pahep_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracanthurus hepatus Common Names: Hippo Tang, Palette Surgeonfish, Pacific Blue Tang, Regal Tang Max. size: 31.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) 12.2 inches Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 40 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = East Africa to the Line Islands, north to southern Japan, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, and Samoa. Throughout Micronesia. Also known from Gilbert Islands (Kiribati); Mariana Islands and Mascarene Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-20; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-19. Bright blue, yellow and black in color. Biology: Occurs in clear, current-swept terraces of seaward reefs. Observed in loose aggregations 1 or 2 meters above the bottom; juveniles and subadults typical in groups near isolated Pocillopora eydouxi coral heads and when alarmed hide themselves tightly among the branches. Feeds on zooplankton. Relatively uncommon and highly localized. A very popular and hardy aquarium fish. Aquarium Care: This species can be hard to keep, because it is more susceptible to some diseases (ich, lateral line and fin erosion). Can be shy at first, so hiding places will be helpful. Usually not too aggressive, unless same or similar species. May be picked on by more aggressive species. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:22 -0600 Indian Mimic Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=87&title=indian-mimic-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=87&amp;title=indian-mimic-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41mimic_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41mimic_tang.jpg" alt="41mimic_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus tristis Common Name: Indian Mimic Tang/Surgeonfish, Indian Ocean Mimic Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 26 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indian Ocean = Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea west to Maldives and Chagos Archipelago, and east to islands of southern Indonesia at least to Bali. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-33; Anal soft rays: 22-29. Margin of caudal fin narrow and white. No orange area behind gill opening and extending ventrally behind base of pectoral fins (juveniles mimic the angelfish Centropyge eibli). Biology: Occurs in shallow lagoon and seaward reefs, in areas of mixed coral, rock or sand. Juveniles mimic the cryptic Centropyge eibli. Aquarium Care: Grazes on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgaes. Mimics the Centropyge eibli as a juvenile to avoid predation. Not too aggressive, unless the same or similar species. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:22 -0600 Longnose Surgeonfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=81&title=longnose-surgeonfish&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=81&amp;title=longnose-surgeonfish&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Zeros_u2.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Zeros_u2.jpg" alt="41Zeros_u2.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Zebrasoma rostratum Common Names: Black Tang, Longnose Surgeonfish Max. size: 21.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 23 - 28°C Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Line, Marquesan, Society, and Tuamoto islands to Pitcairn Group (Ducie Islands). Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 4-5; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-28; Anal soft rays: 19-24. Colour dark brown to nearly black (in life with faint irregular longitudinal bluish lines following scale rows). Snout protruding. Body depth 1.9 to 2.1 times in SL. Lower teeth with 5 denticulations, the central one twice as large as adjacent ones. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs. Its small and numerous pharyngeal teeth suggest a diet that consists mainly of filamentous algae. Aquarium Care: Can be quite aggressive once it is established (especially in a smaller sized tank). Needs an adequate diet for active herbivores. Keep only one per tank, unless in a very large system, and introduced together. Provide live rock for the constant grazing behavior. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:21 -0600 Orangespot Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=82&title=orangespot-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=82&amp;title=orangespot-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41orangespot_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41orangespot_tang.jpg" alt="41orangespot_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus olivaceus Common Names: Orangespot Surgeonfish/Tang, Orangeshoulder Surgeonfish/Tang, Orangeband Surgeonfish/Tang Max. size: 35.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 46 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean to the Hawaiian and Tuamoto Islands, north to Japan, south to Lord Howe Island; throughout Micronesia. Replaced by Acanthurus tennenti in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 23-25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22-24. Body of adult dark grayish brown; juveniles yellow; posterior to upper end of gill opening is a bright orange horizontal band, with purplish black border. Head and anterior half of body usually abruptly paler than the posterior half. Anterior gill rakers 24-28; posterior 23-27. Large adult males (about 17 cm) with more definite convexity of snout profile. Biology: Inhabits seaward reefs, in areas of bare rock or mixed rubble and sand, from 9 to at least 46 m depth; juveniles inhabit protected bays and lagoons, singly or in small groups in as little as 3 m. Adults occur singly or in schools and feed on surface film of detritus, diatoms, and fine filamentous algae covering sand and bare rock. The species is rarely poisonous. Aquarium Care: A lot of swimming space and grazing opportunities. Will normally ignore tankmates, even other tangs, but only one per tank. Add before other tangs (unless A. nigricans or A. triostegus because they are less aggressive). However, every individual is different. Some references indicate this species is aggressive. Juveniles are yellow, and as they mature the orangespot develops. <br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:21 -0600 Convict Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=83&title=convict-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=83&amp;title=convict-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Actri_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Actri_u1.jpg" alt="41Actri_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus triostegus Max. size: 27.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 90 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = throughout the region except for the seas around the Arabian Peninsula. Eastern Pacific = lower Gulf of California to Panama, Revillagigedo Islands, Cocos Island, Clipperton, and the Galapagos. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-22. Body olivaceous gray, with 4 vertical stripes (1 stripe on head across the yellow eye; 1 on caudal peduncle); shading to white ventrally, often with a sharp line of demarcation. Sharp, forward-pointing, erectile spine on each side of caudal peduncle which folds down into a groove. Scales minute. Teeth with denticulations on sides and top. Gill rakers 18-22 in anterior row, 19-24 in posterior row. Biology: Occur in lagoon and seaward reefs with hard substrate; young abundant in tide pools. Occasionally form schools; feed on filamentous algae in large aggregations. During spawning, clouds of eggs and sperm are preyed upon by eagle rays which are often present during spawning. Form spawning aggregations. Size of metamorphosis from post-larva stage to juvenile is 3.2 cm. Aquarium Care: Grazes on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgae. One of the least aggressive [i]Acanthurus[/i] spp.. If keeping more than one in a large aquarium, add them together. The Convict Tang is more apt to be picked on by other Tangs. If to be kept with other genus, Naso and Zebrasoma are good choices. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:35:21 -0600 Black Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=75&title=black-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=75&amp;title=black-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41black_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41black_tang.jpg" alt="41black_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus gahhm Common Names: Black Surgeonfish/Tang, Monk Tang Max. size: 40.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 40 m Climate: tropical; 25 - 27°C Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = endemic to the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 23-26. Characterized by having 2 longitudinal bands on the side, one from the hind margin of the eye posteriorly, another from the groove around the caudal peduncle spine anteriorly. Juveniles of less than 5 cm SL lack the anterior band; less than 10 cm SL lack the posterior band. Reaches 24 cm SL. Biology: Often found in large groups in open areas near coral or rock. Aquarium Care: Minimum tank size of 180 gallons with a lot of swimming space and hiding spots. May act aggressively towards tankmates. Keep one per tank. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:26:57 -0600 Achilles Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=76&title=achilles-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=76&amp;title=achilles-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Acanthurus_achilles.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Acanthurus_achilles.jpg" alt="41Acanthurus_achilles.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus achilles Common Names: Achilles Tang/Surgeonfish, Red-Tailed Surgeonfish Max. size: 24.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 10 m Climate: tropical; 26 - 28°C Distribution: Pacific Ocean = western Caroline Islands and Torres Strait to the Hawaiian, Marquesan, and Ducie Islands, south to New Caledonia; Mariana and Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Eastern Central Pacific = southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 29-33; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 26-29. Dark brown, nearly black in color. Erectile spine (sharp and forward-pointing) on each side of caudal peduncle which folds down into a groove. Mouth small, snout noticeably extended. Light blue ring around chin and presence of spot of same color on gill cover at angle of gill opening. Dorsal fin with soft part having longer base than spinous part. Juveniles lack the large orange spot on caudal area. Biology: Occurs in clear seaward reefs, usually in groups. Feeds on filamentous and small fleshy algae. Spine in caudal peduncle may be venomous. Size of metamorphosis from postlarva stage to juvenile is 6 cm. This species sometimes hybridizes with A. nigricans Aquarium Care:A lot of swimming space and turbulent water flow. Can be aggressive and will bother other tangs. Will graze on filamentous microalgae and small fleshy macroalgaes. In smaller tanks, this fish may &quot;pace&quot; the tank and wither away. <br /><br />5 comments mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:26:57 -0600 Blue Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=77&title=blue-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=77&amp;title=blue-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41blue_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41blue_tang.jpg" alt="41blue_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus coeruleus Common Names: Atlantic Blue Tang, Blue Tang Max. size: 39.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 40 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Western Atlantic = New York, USA and Bermuda to the Gulf of Mexico and Brazil. Eastern Atlantic: Ascension Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 24-26. A deep-bodied surgeonfish (body depth 1.7 in SL) with a conspicuous yellow caudal spine. Has the most distinctive coloration of all western Atlantic surgeonfishes. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs, inshore grassy or rocky areas. Forms small groups. Mainly diurnal. Feeds entirely on algae. At Fernando de Noronha Archipelago in southwestern Atlantic, juveniles hold cleaning stations together with the doctorfish (Acanthurus chirurgus) and sergeant major (Abudefduf saxatilis) and graze algae as well as pick molted skin and parasites from green turtles (Chelonia mydas). This behavior is preceded by a characteristic inspection usually followed by feeding nips on the turtles’ skin (head, limbs, and tail), as well as on the carapace. The most inspected and cleaned body parts are the flippers. The spine on both sides of the caudal peduncle may inflict painful wounds. Aquarium Care: Can behave hostile in a smaller tank, but is less so the larger the aquarium. Juveniles are yellow with a blue ring around the eye. Some adults may also have a yellow tail. Can be kept in small groups if housed in very large tanks (&gt;180 gallons). <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:26:57 -0600 Bluelined Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=73&title=bluelined-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=73&amp;title=bluelined-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41bluelined_tang.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41bluelined_tang.jpg" alt="41bluelined_tang.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus nigroris Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 90 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Aldabra and Seychelles to the Hawaiian, Marquesan and Tuamoto Islands; throughout Micronesia. Society Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 23-25. Color drab dark brown; spots on body located at the rear base of dorsal and anal fins. Black spot at rear base of dorsal fin not large, its greatest width more than 2 times in eye diameter. White posterior margin of caudal fin very narrow, its width less than 4 times in pupil diameter. No definite black margin around groove of peduncular spine. Body depth 1.8 to 2 times in SL. Maximum standard length about 20 cm. Biology: Inhabits clear lagoon and seaward reefs; often in areas with mixed coral, pavement, rubble and sand substrates. Occurs singly or in small groups. Feeds on filamentous algae, diatoms and fine algal film of compacted sand. Relatively uncommon throughout Micronesia; rare on Great Barrier Reef. Aquarium Care: A lot of hiding places (shy species) and swimming room. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:26:56 -0600 Brown Tang http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=74&title=brown-tang&cat=503 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=74&amp;title=brown-tang&amp;cat=503"><img title="41Acnig_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/503/thumbs/41Acnig_u1.jpg" alt="41Acnig_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Acanthurus nigrofuscus Common Names: Brown Tang, Spot-Cheeked Surgeonfish, Lavender Tang Max. size: 21.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific = Red Sea south to Transkei, South Africa and east to the Hawaiian and Tuamoto islands; north to southern Japan, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef, New Caledonia, and Rapa (Austral Islands). Throughout Micronesia. Mascarene, Line and Society Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 22-24. Brown in color when preserved; with or without fine bluish gray longitudinal lines on body; pale pectoral fins with upper edge narrowly black; pelvic fins brown. Lips blackish brown; median upper teeth tend to be pointed. Dorsal fin base with a prominent black spot larger than 1/2 eye diameter; a smaller spot on base of anal fin. Groove of caudal spine encircled with a narrow black margin. Gill rakers on anterior row:20-24; on posterior row:18-23. Biology: Found on hard substrates of shallow lagoon and seaward reefs from the lower surge zone to a depth of more than 15 m. Feed on filamentous algae. Form spawning aggregations. A species at the bottom of the 'pecking order' among surgeon fishes, and as a result employs the strategy of feeding in large schools that overwhelm the territorial defenses of other herbivores. Aquarium Care. Live rock is preferred by this species for grazing, and will provide plenty of structure for hiding places and territories. It is aggressive towards other Tangs, but peaceful with other fish. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 13:26:56 -0600