Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Thu, 13 Dec 2018 22:43:48 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 032 http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1029&title=032&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1029&amp;title=032&amp;cat=504"><img title="032.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/032.JPG" alt="032.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance<br /><br />Description: Sunrise ecobalance Thu, 14 Jun 2007 11:45:04 +0000 033 http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1028&title=033&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1028&amp;title=033&amp;cat=504"><img title="033.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/033.JPG" alt="033.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance<br /><br />Description: neon aka catalina ecobalance Thu, 14 Jun 2007 11:43:37 +0000 tobacco bass http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1026&title=tobacco-bass&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1026&amp;title=tobacco-bass&amp;cat=504"><img title="034.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/034.JPG" alt="034.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance<br /><br />Description: tobacco bass<br /><br />1 comment ecobalance Thu, 14 Jun 2007 11:35:15 +0000 Blackstripe Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=796&title=blackstripe-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=796&amp;title=blackstripe-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="450P_nigrovittatus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/450P_nigrovittatus.jpg" alt="450P_nigrovittatus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: NaH2O<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis nigrovittatus Common Names: Blackstripe Dottyback, Darkline Dottyback Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 12 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: eastern part of Persian Gulf and Straits of Hormuz, Gulf of Oman and southern part of it, Djibouti. Species occur in two main color forms (with and without the broad, dark brown to dark grey stripe on the side of the body). Biology: A cryptic species; collected from tide pools, around boulders, and rock and coral reefs. May sometimes take refuge among spines of large Diadema sea urchins. Aquarium Care: The Blackstripe Dottyback is not commonly found in the hobby. A secretive species that spends a lot of its time hiding. As with other members of the Pseudochromis genus, choose tankmates carefully. NaH2O Tue, 11 Jan 2005 02:27:06 +0000 Ridgeback Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=317&title=ridgeback-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=317&amp;title=ridgeback-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Ridgeback_Basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Ridgeback_Basslet.jpg" alt="41Ridgeback_Basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma mowbrayi Common Names: Ridgeback Basslet, Cave Basslet Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 30 - 60 m Distribution: Western Atlantic: Bermuda, southern Florida (USA) and Bahamas to northern South America. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6-7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12. Snout relatively long; yellow band from tip of snout and chin to eye. Biology: A solitary species inhabiting rocky and reef areas. Reported to prefer smaller reef interstices. Usually found in pairs. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species is secretive and does best when kept with non-aggressive species. More than one Ridgeback Basslet can be kept in a larger tank, and can also be kept with others in the genus. Not commonly seen due to the depth it is found, so it is pricey when available. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 20:03:12 +0000 Pinstripe Reef Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=316&title=pinstripe-reef-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=316&amp;title=pinstripe-reef-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Pinstriped_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Pinstriped_basslet.jpg" alt="41Pinstriped_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma susumi Common Names: Pinstripe Reef Basslet, Meteor Reef Basslet; Meteor Perch; Pinstriped Basslet Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 34 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea to the Line Islands and Samoa, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to Reunion and New Caledonia; Palau to the eastern Caroline and Marshall islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11-12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8 Light gray changing to light red on the caudal peduncle and caudal fin. There are eight (or possibly nine) brown stripes on the body. It also has a reddish brown streak on the side of the snout in front of the eye. Biology: The pinstripe basslet occurs around lagoon patch reefs as well as deep drop-offs in crevices and caves. It is considered to be the most abundant species in this genus in the Indo-Pacific. Aquarium Care: Liopropoma species are well suited to a minireef with penty of hiding places. Two different species can be kept together if introduced at the same time. Unless a very large system, it is recommended only one specimen per tank. They will eat most prepared foods, as well as frozen preparations for carnivores, shaved shrimp, and will also feed on small crustaceans (i.e. amphipods and copepods). They may hide for several days before venturing out. If housed with large competitive fish, they may not eat and will constantly hide. Non-aggressive to other fish. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:57:56 +0000 Peppermint Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=315&title=peppermint-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=315&amp;title=peppermint-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41peppermint_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41peppermint_basslet.jpg" alt="41peppermint_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma rubre Common Names: Peppermint Basslet, Swissguard Basslet Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 45 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Atlantic: southern Florida, USA and Bahamas to northern South America. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6-7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12. Body yellow-orange with 5 wide black lines along side bordered by red above and below. Large black spot on second dorsal fin; similar spot on anal fin; caudal fin has 2 black spots connected by black bar. Both the candy (Lipropoma carmabi) and peppermint basslet have alternating stripes running from the nose to tail. Liopropoma carmabi has pale blue edges around the spot on the dorsal and caudal fins, lacks a spot on the anal fin, and its stripes are orange and lavender, while those of the peppermint basslet are reddish-brown and pinkish-tan. The candy basslet is definitely a more stunning fish. Biology: A solitary species inhabiting deep recesses of coral reefs. Common, but secretive and rarely seen. Aquarium Care: This species is difficult to capture, so is not commonly seen in the hobby (and will be pricey when available). The Peppermint Basslet should be kept with non-aggressive species. More than one can be kept in a large tank, however, the dominant fish may be aggressive toward the subordinate. If one individual is hiding all of the time, then it is probably getting picked on, and may need to be seperated. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:53:39 +0000 Candy Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=314&title=candy-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=314&amp;title=candy-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Candy_Basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Candy_Basslet.jpg" alt="41Candy_Basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma carmabi Max. size: 6.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 70 m Distribution: Western Atlantic = Florida Keys, USA and Bahamas to northern South America. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 6-7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12-13. Head, body, and caudal fin alternately striped with yellow-orange and lavender, these stripes separated by red lines. Biology: Found in the recesses of coral reefs. Secretive Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species does best when kept in dim lighting, and has been observed to be more active at night. Upon introduction, the Candy Basslet will hide, but once comfortable it will spend some time out in view. The Candy Basslet is not easily collected due to its secretive nature, and results in a pricey fish. One per tank. mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:49:35 +0000 Aurora Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=313&title=aurora-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=313&amp;title=aurora-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Aurora_Basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Aurora_Basslet.jpg" alt="41Aurora_Basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma aurora Common Names: Aurora Basslet, Sunset Basslet, Yellowmargin Basslet Max. size: 17.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 49 - 184 m Climate: deep-water; Temperature 21 - 27ºC Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific = Hawaiian Islands. Biology: A deep-water species that is rarely captured. Aquarium Care: The Aurora Basslet grows to a much larger length than most members of the Liopropoma genus. Because of the size, it is more of a threat to crustaceans and small fishes. This species is a deep water species, and will be out more frequently if kept in a dimly lit aquarium (in a shallow water tank, it will hide more). mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:46:17 +0000 African Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=312&title=african-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=312&amp;title=african-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41African_Basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41African_Basslet.jpg" alt="41African_Basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Liopropoma africanum Max. size: 8.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 8 - 48 m; Temperature 22 - 27ºC Distribution: Indian Ocean = Pemba Island, Tanzania to Djibouti. Reported from West Sumatra, Indonesia. Biology: Inhabits recesses of seaward reefs Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places, crevices, and non-aggressive tankmates. Liopropoma spp. are well suited to a minireef. They won't bother most ornamental inverts, however, they may eat smaller crustaceans (i.e. copepods, amphipods). In order to retain coloration, feed a varied diet. Upon introduction, the Liopropoma spp. may hide for several days before venturing out. When kept with large competetive fish, they will stay hidden and go off foods. With plenty of hiding places, two different species can be kept together, if introduced at the same time. Unless a very large system, it is recommended only one species per tank. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 25 Dec 2004 19:42:43 +0000 Lyretail Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=210&title=lyretail-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=210&amp;title=lyretail-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Lyretail_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Lyretail_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Lyretail_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis steenei Common Names: Lyretail Dottyback, Steene's Dottyback Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 8 - 100 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Indonesia and northern Australia. Morphology: Male with a narrow white bar behind the eye, broad dark margins on the pelvic and anal fins, and slightly orange coloration on the upper and lower margins of the caudal fin. Female is dark gray in color with a blue line behind the eye and may or may not have a yellow tail. In males, the pelvic fins are longer than those of the female. Biology: Inhabits coastal patch reefs on soft bottom slopes. Highly territorial and aggressive. This and related species have been known to bite the camera housings of divers and kill aquarium tank mates. Aquarium Care: Yikes!!! Talk about aggressive, this species is extremely aggressive both in the aquarium and on the reef. It's large canine teeth can inflict damage. Fish of smaller, similar, or sometimes larger size will be attacked and killed by the Lyretail Dottyback. This species should be housed with tankmates that can look out for themselves, such as, Larger Hawkfish, Groupers, Triggers, Larger Angelfish, and Surgeonfish. The Lyretail Dottyback will eat crustaceans, including Stomatopods, ornamental shrimps and crabs. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:41:29 +0000 Rose Island Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=211&title=rose-island-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=211&amp;title=rose-island-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Rose_Island_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Rose_Island_basslet.jpg" alt="41Rose_Island_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudoplesiops rosae Common Names: Rose Island Basslet, Largescaled Dottyback Max. size: 2.3 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 10 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Maldives to Samoa, north the Yaeyama Islands (Ryukyu Islands), south to northwestern Australia and the southern Great Barrier Reef; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 1; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-23; Anal spines: 1; Anal soft rays: 13-14. Has a red eye and orange head becoming brown on the body. Biology: Found in inshore reefs and in caves with rich invertebrate growth in walls; feeds on benthic invertebrates. Aquarium Care: This is a secretive species that spends most time hiding. It may be seen occasionally moving from hole to hole, or coming out to catch a piece of food. It may be more comfortable in a dimly lit aquarium, and would venture out more often. If kept with more aggressive species, the Rose Island Basslet may not eat. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:41:29 +0000 Hidden Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=212&title=hidden-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=212&amp;title=hidden-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Hidden_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Hidden_basslet.jpg" alt="41Hidden_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudoplesiops typus Common Names: Hidden Dottyback, Ringeyed Dottyback, Hidden Basslet Max. size: 4.6 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 65 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific = Borneo to the Solomon Islands, north to the Philippines, south to northwestern Australia and Queensland; Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-26; Anal spines: 2-3; Anal soft rays: 14-16. Variable from pale yellow to red. Biology: Found in reef crests and lagoons; also near coral heads Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species is very secretive, and will hide most of the time. It will occasionally come out to grab pieces of food once it is comfortable in the captive environment. The Hidden Dottyback may pick on small docile species in smaller tanks, howeve,r it is not an overly aggressive fish towards unrelated tankmates. Feed a varied diet and color-enhancing food to help this species retain its coloration. One per tank, unless a very large system. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:41:29 +0000 Diadem Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=207&title=diadem-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=207&amp;title=diadem-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Diadem_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Diadem_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Diadem_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis diadema (also referenced as Pictichromis diadema) Max. size: 6.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 30 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific = eastern Malay Peninsula and western Philippines. Biology: Found in sheltered reefs with rich coral growth. Small groups are found among coral or rocks. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species can be quite aggressive for its small size, but is popular because of its coloration. It will attack other fish which are similar or smaller in size, as well as damsels, gobies, anthias, grammas, fire gobies, juveniles of larger species, and will bother cleaner shrimp. The Diadem Dottyback isn't as bothersome when kept with larger fishes, such as Surgeonfish, Angelfish, and Butterflyfish. This species is likely to have radical color loss, and the feeding of vitamin-enriched and color-enhanced foods may help. In larger tanks, with a lot of corals, live rock, crevices, and holes, this species can be kept in small groups (although, it seems in captive systems, establishing the social structure may result in disasterous results for individuals on the bottom rung). The Diadem Dottyback will eat smaller ornamental shrimp. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:34 +0000 Forktail Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=208&title=forktail-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=208&amp;title=forktail-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Forktail_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Forktail_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Forktail_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis dixurus Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 60 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea. Biology: Found in caves and around isolated rocks and coral colonies, or around silt-covered locations. Juvenile are found singly, while adults are in pairs. Aquarium Care: This is not a common species in the hobby. it can be aggressive, and should not be kept with smaller docile fish, unless in a very large tank. Plan tankmates carefully. Keep one per tank, or in male-female pairs. A great choice in a deep-water reef tank. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:34 +0000 Striped Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=209&title=striped-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=209&amp;title=striped-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Striped_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Striped_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Striped_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis sankeyi Common Names: Striped Dottyback, Sankey's Dottyback Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 10 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Gulf of Aden and the southwestern part of the Red Sea. Biology: Inhabits rock and coralline ledges and caves. Occurs in colonies. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: Not too aggressive, and can be kept in small groups in very large tanks, provided many hiding places, and individuals introduced together. If one specimen becomes overly aggressive, it may need to be removed. The Striped Dottyback will pick on smaller more docile species in smaller aquariums. Will eat smaller ornamental shrimps and bristleworms. Feed a variety including marine fish, crustacean flesh, frozen preparations, and mysid shrimp. Caution for open tanks, as this species can jump out. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:34 +0000 Magenta Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=204&title=magenta-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=204&amp;title=magenta-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Magenta_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Magenta_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Magenta_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis porphyreus (also referenced as Pictichromis porphyrea) Common Names: Magenta Dottyback, Purple Dottyback, Strawberry Dottyback Max. size: 6.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 6 - 65 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Philippines to Samoa, north to Ryukyu Islands, south to Moluccas and Admiralty Islands; Palau, Caroline Islands, and southern Marshalls in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 21-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 11-12. Easily identified by the bright purple color that looks bright blue in sunlit underwater conditions. Biology: Hovers above coral or rubble and inhabits steep outer reef slopes and outer channel walls. Aquarium Care: This species is less aggressive than others in the genus, however, it can display aggression in a passive community tank. It is known to bother grammas, dart gobies, small wrasses, and other small mild-mannered fish (especially true in smaller tanks). The Magenta Dottyback is moderately hardy, and will eat most captive foods. Feed a varied diet that includes color-enhancing fare to help keep the bright coloration. In the wild this fish is very nervous, tends to stay near its hiding spot, and eats zooplankton. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:33 +0000 Pyle's Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=205&title=pyle-27s-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=205&amp;title=pyle-27s-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Pyle_s_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Pyle_s_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Pyle_s_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis pylei Max. size: 8.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 40 - 85 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Flores and Banda seas. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25-28; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 1-15. Light gray becoming yellow on rear third the body and tail. Biology: Inhabits steep drop-offs. It has been collected at Palau at depth of 85 m. Aquarium Care: Given the depth at which this species is found, it will probably do better in a tank with lower light conditions. Not normally seen in North American trade, but has been kept in Japan. A durable species, which is not as aggressive as others in this genus, but still may act aggressively towards similar sized or smaller, more docile fish. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:33 +0000 Orange Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=206&title=orange-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=206&amp;title=orange-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Orange_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Orange_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Orange_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis aldabraensis Common Names: Orange Dottyback, Arabian Bluelined Dottyback, Neon Dottyback Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine Distribution: Indian Ocean: Aldabra, Persian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Biology: A cryptic species, quick to take shelter. Found in bays among rocky rubble, on fringing reefs among coralline algae, rubble, boulders and live hard corals, in tide pools and even under oil rigs living in Coca-Cola cans on muddy substrate. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: This species does well in a moderately aggressive communty tank. Tankmates that are the same or smaller size can be attacked by the Orange Dottyback. It is better to house this fish with species that can look after themselves, such as, Larger Angelfish, Large Damselfish, Surgeonfish, and Hawkfish. It is also noted that this species does not do well with wrasses (in the wild, one study showed no wrasses in the area of this species). If fed a varied diet, this species will retain its color (including mysid shrimp, frozen preparations, krill, brine shrimp, marine fish, crustacean flesh). The Orange Dottyback will eat small tubeworms, ornamental shrimp, and fireworms, even those too big to swallow whole. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:33 +0000 Fleckfin Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=201&title=fleckfin-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=201&amp;title=fleckfin-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Fleckfin_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Fleckfin_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Fleckfin_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudoplesiops wassi Max. size: 2.9 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 45 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean = Micronesia and Australia to American Samoa. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 1; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27-29; Anal spines: 2; Anal soft rays: 16-18. Caudal fin rounded or truncate to slightly emarginate. Biology: Found in rock and coral reef habitats, including surge channels, reef slopes and drop-offs. Aquarium Care: Because of the secretive nature of Pseudoplesiops spp., the Fleckfin Dottyback will do best when provided plenty of hiding places. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:32 +0000 Pale Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=202&title=pale-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=202&amp;title=pale-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Pale_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Pale_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Pale_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis pesi Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 45 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: endemic to the Red Sea. Biology: Occurs around small isolated rocks or corals on sandy bottoms. Found singly or in pairs. Aquarium Care: Not common in the hobby with any regularity. This species is large and aggressive, so care must be taken when considering tankmates. The Pale Dottyback may eat ornamental crustaceans and bother smaller more docile fish. One per tank, unless a pair. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:32 +0000 Longfin Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=203&title=longfin-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=203&amp;title=longfin-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Longfin_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Longfin_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Longfin_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis polynemus (also referenced Manoichthys polynemus) Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 50 m Distribution Western Central Pacific: Philippines to the Moluccas and Palau. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14. Recognized by the long ventral fins, filamentous median fins, and yellow tear-mark under the eye. Found on steep slopes and walls with tubular sponges, usually in depths of about 20 m. Biology: An uncommon species that inhabits steep outer reef slopes, in areas with dense coral growth Aquarium Care: This durable species will push around smaller fish, however, it is not as aggressive as some. Keep from housing the Longfin Dottyback with other Dottybacks, especially the more aggressive ones (i.e. Steene's dottyback, Australian Dottyback). mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:32 +0000 Blue-Striped Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=200&title=blue-striped-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=200&amp;title=blue-striped-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Blue-striped_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Blue-striped_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Blue-striped_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis springeri Common Names: Blue-Striped Dottyback, Springer's Dottyback Max. size: 5.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 60 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 27°C Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Red Sea. Biology: A common inhabitant of lagoon and seaward reefs. Found among corals. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species is hardy, active, and moderately aggressive. In smaller tanks it will bother anthias, dart gobies, fire gobies and fairy wrasses. The Blue-Striped Dottyback does best with kept one to a tank, unless a mated pair, or in large well aquascaped aquariums. It accepts a wide variety of aquarim foods, and will eat small bristleworms and smaller ornamental shrimps. Enjoys the shelter of branching stony corals, and hiding places in the rock. The flashes of blue on black body make this a favorite fish among hobbysits. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:40:31 +0000 Royal Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=199&title=royal-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=199&amp;title=royal-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Royal_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Royal_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Royal_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis paccagnellae (also referenced as Pictichromis paccagnellae) Max. size: 7.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 50 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Indonesia (Java and Sulawesi) to Vanuatu; Palau in Micronesia. Biology: Found in shallow coastal to deep outer-reef drop-off. Hovers close to coral or rubble. Aquarium Care: One of the most aggressive dottybacks available for its size. Should not keep species such as gobies, dart gobies, fire gobies, cleaner fish, or small wrasses with the Royal Dottyback. In the wild, it has a territory of several square yards, so more than one fish except in a large system might be difficult. It will eat smaller ornamental shrimps. The Royal Dottyback should be fed a variety of foods including marine fish, crustacean flesh, mysid shrimp, frozen preparations, vitamin and color enhanced foods (as this species is prone to lose some coloration). This species is very durable. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:40 +0000 Marshall Island Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=196&title=marshall-island-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=196&amp;title=marshall-island-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Marshall_Is_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Marshall_Is_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Marshall_Is_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis marshallensis Max. size: 8.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 30 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Philippines and Taiwan to Vanuatu, south to northwestern Australia and New Caledonia; eastern Caroline and Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 24-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 11-14. Yellow tail and yellow spots on body scales that form dotted lines. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs. Secretive, hiding among the branches of stony corals or under mushroom corals (Fungia spp.). Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species is not common in the hobby due to its secretive nature, and subdued colors. It spends most of its time hiding among the tank decor, however, it will come out to catch some food passing by. The Marshall Island Dottyback isn't as aggressive as other Dottybacks, but will assert itself when defending its hiding spots. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:39 +0000 Spot-tailed Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=197&title=spot-tailed-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=197&amp;title=spot-tailed-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Spot-tailed_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Spot-tailed_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Spot-tailed_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis jamesi Max. size: 5.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Western Pacific: Great Barrier Reef to Samoa. Biology: Occurs inshore. Found on reef flats and on lagoon reefs. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. As with other members of this genus, care should be taken when chosing tankmates. Feed a varied diet. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:39 +0000 Olive Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=198&title=olive-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=198&amp;title=olive-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Olive_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Olive_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Olive_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis olivaceus Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 20 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea. Biology: Found among corals (especially Acropora and Pocillopora spp.). The juveniles are especially secretive, spending most of their time deep within coral colonies, while adults occur within Acropora coral thickets as well as among coral boulders. Adults occur in pairs. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: This species is a durable inhabitant. The Olive Dottyback will dig holes under pieces of live rock or coral, and hide among branching corals. It can be aggressive to smaller docile fish such as, grammas, assessors, small wrasses, small sweetlips, gobies, dart gobies, fanged blennies, and anthias. In large tanks, male-female pairs can be kept together. Very similar to Pseudochromis linda. The Olive Dottyback differs by having an emarginate caudal fin, a tail with a limited amount of yellow, and many elongate dark blue spots. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:39 +0000 Sailfin Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=194&title=sailfin-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=194&amp;title=sailfin-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Sailfin_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Sailfin_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Sailfin_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ogilbyina velifera (also referenced as Oxycercichthys velifera) Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 12 - 35 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25-26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 16. Adults pale gray to yellowish with upper part of head bluish; dark blue spot at front of dorsal fin; dorsal fin bluish, grading to yellow posteriorly. Biology: Occurs inshore. Found around rock and coral formations on sandy bottoms. Aquarium Care: This species is large and aggressive. When deciding on tankmates for this fish, care should be taken. It will pick on smaller fish, porcelain crabs, and ornamental shrimps. Even in larger systems, any fish that nears its hiding spots may be attacked. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:38 +0000 Sunrise Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=195&title=sunrise-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=195&amp;title=sunrise-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Psfla_u9.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Psfla_u9.jpg" alt="41Psfla_u9.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis flavivertex Max. size: 7.2 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Biology: Occurs usually around bases of small rocks or coral heads on sandy bottoms. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: This species is a moderately aggressive dottyback, and is suitable for some community situations. It may tolerate other dottybacks or a speciemen of the opposite sex, provided plenty of hiding places and attention is paid to the subordinate individual. May eat smaller ornamental crustaceans, small stomatopods, and fireworms. The Sunrise Dottyback may be intimidated by larger tankmates, which causes it to hide constantly. Feed a variety of meaty foods, and color-enhancing foods, as it may lose its coloration. Has been known to attack cleaner shrimps. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:22:38 +0000 Queensland Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=191&title=queensland-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=191&amp;title=queensland-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Psque_f0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Psque_f0.jpg" alt="41Psque_f0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ogilbyina queenslandiae Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 20 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: endemic to Queensland, Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 32-37; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18-21. Color variable depending on sex; male mainly red anteriorly and purplish posteriorly; dorsal, anal and caudal fins bluish except dorsal reddish on anterior part; female with a grayish head, largely yellow-orange on side, with 5-6 brown bars on upper half of anterior part of body; fins largely reddish. Biology: Usually found in or near holes of coral reefs. Aquarium Care: This species is similar in aggressiveness as Ogilbyina novaehollandiae. It is a poor choice for a reef aquarium (unless smaller docile fish and crustaceans are not included) or a passive community aquarium. It should not be kept with grammas, assessors, butterflyfish, gobies, sand tilefish, juvenile sweetlips, or other dottybacks. Does better when kept with Larger Angelfish, Hawkfish, Surgeonfish, Squirrelfish, and Triggers. It will eat just about everything, including bristleworms and small stomatopods. Photo Credit: Bob Fenner mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:35 +0000 Orchid Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=192&title=orchid-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=192&amp;title=orchid-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Psfri_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Psfri_u1.jpg" alt="41Psfri_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis fridmani Common Names: Orchid Dottyback, Fridman's Dottyback, King Solomon's Dottyback Max. size: 6.3 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 60 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: known only from the Red Sea. Biology: Usually on vertical rock faces or beneath overhangs, taking refuge in small holes. Generally common. Feeds on small crustaceans, both benthic and planktonic forms, and polychaete worms. It is often found in loose groups. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: This extremely hardy species adapts well to captivity. It can be kept singly, mated pairs, or in small groups as long as there is plenty of live rock, hiding spots, introduced simultaneously, and the tank is large enough. The Orchid Dottyback is initially shy, but will become more bold as it gets used to its environment. When kept with larger, more aggressive species, it will remain shy, hiding, and perhaps not eating. This is one of the most sociable of the dottybacks. An occasional member will bother smaller, more passive species such as, fire gobies, gobies, and smaller wrasses. It will defend its hiding spots from invaders. The Orchid Dottyback will accept may foods, and should be fed a variety including frozen preparations for carnivores, mysid shrimp, and crustacean flesh. It may eat small fanworms and bristleworms. Beware of open aquariums, this fish may jump out. <br /><br />5 comments mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:35 +0000 Yellowtail Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=193&title=yellowtail-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=193&amp;title=yellowtail-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Yellowtail_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Yellowtail_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Yellowtail_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis linda Common Names: Yellowtail Dottyback, Linda's Dottyback Max. size: 8.1 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine; depth range 1 - 15 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Gulf of Aden and southeastern Arabian Peninsula, and from the Persian Gulf east to Pakistan. Biology: Collected from tidal pools and coral and rock reefs; associated with live and dead branching corals (e.g. Acropora and Pocillopora). Aquarium Care: It can be aggressive to smaller more docile fish, including anthias, grammas, assessors, small wrasses, fanged blennies, small sweetlips, gobies, and dart gobies. This species is very similar to Pseudochromis olivaceus (Olive Dottyback). mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:35 +0000 Darkstriped Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=187&title=darkstriped-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=187&amp;title=darkstriped-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Darkstriped_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Darkstriped_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Darkstriped_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Labracinus melanotaenia Common Names: Darkstriped Dottyback, Spotfin Dottyback Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 20 m Distribution: Western Pacific = widely distributed throughout the Indo-Malayan Archipelago, from southern Japan, south to the Northwest Shelf of Australia, and east to New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14-15. Lower lip uninterrupted at symphysis. Vomerine teeth relatively large, arranged in a chevron. Caudal fin rounded; upper part with 5 - 6 procurrent rays and 9 principal rays. Lateral line with anterodorsal series of 43 - 62 (usually 48 - 62) tubed scales extending from gill opening, and a peduncular series of 12 - 14 (usually 18 - 22) tubed scales. Dorsal and anal fins with distinct scaly sheaths. Orangish red overall, with dark rows of spots on the body and blue fin margins. It also has some dark markings along the base of the dorsal fin, with some individuals having a dark spot in the middle of the dorsal. Biology: Found near shelter of coral or rock of shallow reefs, with moderate surge or currents where in spread-out groups of mixed sexes. Moves about activity through the gutters and passages. Feeds on small fishes. Frequently enters the aquarium fish trade, and has been bred in captivity. Aquarium Care: This species has quite the attitude. It should not be housed with smaller, more-docile fish or other dottybacks. Good tankmates would be groupers, snappers, larger angelfish, triggers, large hawkfish, large squirrelfish, and eels. The Darkstriped Dottyback should be kept singly, unless in an extra-large tank (pairs). It eats smaller fish, and if the fish is too big to swallow whole, it will break it up by banging it against a rock or piece of coral. This species will also eat small mantis shrimp, bristleworms, crustaceans, and small fishes. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:34 +0000 Red Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=188&title=red-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=188&amp;title=red-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Fire-tail_devil.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Fire-tail_devil.jpg" alt="41Fire-tail_devil.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Labracinus cyclophthalmus Common Names: Red Dottyback, Firetail Devil, Dampiera, Red Grouper Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 20 m Distribution: Western Pacific = widely distributed throughout the Indo-Malayan Archipelago, from southern Japan, south to the Northwest Shelf of Australia, and east to New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14-15. Lower lip uninterrupted at symphysis. Vomerine teeth relatively large, arranged in a chevron. Caudal fin rounded; upper part with 5 - 6 procurrent rays and 9 principal rays. Lateral line with anterodorsal series of 43 - 62 (usually 48 - 62) tubed scales extending from gill opening, and a peduncular series of 12 - 14 (usually 18 - 22) tubed scales. Dorsal and anal fins with distinct scaly sheaths. Biology: Found near shelter of coral or rock of shallow reefs, with moderate surge or currents where in spread-out groups of mixed sexes. Moves about activity through the gutters and passages. Feeds on small fishes. Frequently enters the aquarium fish trade, and has been bred in captivity. Aquarium Care: This aggressive species can be destructuve to a typical tank community. It will eat ornamental crustaceans and smaller, passive fish (including gobies). It does best with Groupers, Snappers, Triggers, Large Hawkfish, Large Squirrelfish, Larger Angelfish, and eels. The Red Dottyback will bash a fish against a rock or coral piece, if the fish is too large to swallow whole. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:34 +0000 Howson's Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=189&title=howson-27s-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=189&amp;title=howson-27s-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Howson_s_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Howson_s_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Howson_s_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis howsoni Common Names: Howson's Dottyback, Thinstriped Dottyback Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 23 m Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean: Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 14. Anterior tips of palatine tooth patches directed medially behind posterolateral arms of vomerine tooth patch; large dark spot at posterior corner of operculum; color pattern sexually dimorphic, male overall orange anteriorly and purplish grey posteriorly, female entirely purplish grey; neither sex with narrow white bar on head just behind eye. Biology: Found on sand-rubble bottom, around low rocky outcrops. Occurs in pairs Aquarium Care: This species is aggressive and territorial. It should be housed with larger fish that can look after themselves, such as Surgeonfish, Triggers, Larger Angelfish, Larger Hawkfish, and Groupers. The Howson's Dottyback may attack and kill smaller or same-sized fish. Will eat ornamental shrimp and smaller stomatopods, but won't harm more desirable inverts. Similar to P. quinquedentatus, P. steenei, and P. moorei. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:34 +0000 Lined Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=190&title=lined-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=190&amp;title=lined-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Lined_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Lined_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Lined_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Labracinus lineatus Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean: endemic to Western Australia. Reported from Taiwan. Biology: Occurs inshore. Found in or near crevices of coral or rock of shallow reefs. Aquarium Care: Slightly larger than the Red dottyback, this species can be a dangerous addition if not planned for. It should only be kept with fish that are more aggressive, such as, Snappers, Trigers, Groupers, and Porcupinefish. The Lined Dottyback will eat smaller fish, and ornamental crustaceans, including small stomatopods. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:34 +0000 Multicolored Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=184&title=multicolored-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=184&amp;title=multicolored-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Multicolored_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Multicolored_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Multicolored_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Ogilbyina novaehollandiae Common Names: Multicolored Dottyback, Australian Dottyback Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 34-38; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 19-20. Males grayish with reddish head, large individuals usually dark gray to black; females pinkish to bright yellow or greenish with short reddish bars below posterior dorsal fin, large individuals sometimes dark gray to black with red belly. Biology: Occurs inshore near reefs. Found in or near holes. Has been reared in captivity. Aquarium Care: This hardy species is one of the more aggressive members of the subfamily Pseudochrominae. It will attack almost anything in its territory, even larger fish. Tankmates should not include species such as, grammas, butterflyfish, gobies, sand tilefish, juvenile sweetlips, and assessors, or other dottybacks. More suitable tankmates include larger angelfish, hawkfish, surgeonfish, triggers, and squirrelfish. Male-female pairs are even at risk. The Multicolored Dottyback will eat small ornamental crustaceans, bristleworms, and even small stomatopods. It will spend the majority of its time moving through tunnels and crevices, but will come out occasionally for food. A few positives for the Multicolored Dottyback is its hardiness, won't lose its coloration, resistance to disease, and will eat about anything. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:33 +0000 Bluespotted Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=185&title=bluespotted-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=185&amp;title=bluespotted-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Bluespotted_dottyback.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Bluespotted_dottyback.jpg" alt="41Bluespotted_dottyback.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudochromis persicus Common Names: Bluespotted Dottyback, Persian Dottyback Max. size: 15.4 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 25 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean = Persian Gulf to Pakistan Morphology: Elongate body, with bright spots on its sides, operculum and caudal fin. These spots are in rows at the base of the dorsal and anal fins. This fish displays two distinct color phases. In one phase the body and median fins are dark gray with iridescent blue spots. In the other the body is cream or white overall, with a dark stripe running from the snout to the tail. The light phase also has blue spots. The dark phase is most often exhibited by larger fishes, while juveniles usually display the lighter color. In both phases each operculum has a black eye-spot that is trimmed in blue and the red eyes have two blue lines running through them. There are also faint orange and blue markings under the eyes. Biology: Inhabits coastal reefs. It is found among rocks, coral rubble and live stony coral. It typically occurs on silt covered reefs in shallow water. However, it has been recorded at depths of 25 m (83 feet). Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species tends to be shy when first introduced, but once established, it will defend its home/hiding spot. It has a real aggressive nature, and should only be kept one per tank. Due to its aggression, the Bluespotted Dottyback does best when housed with large angels, snappers, tangs, and triggers. This species does well in captivity, but shouldn't be housed with peaceful fish or with valuable crustaceans (i.e. small crabs, shrimp), of which it will consume. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:33 +0000 Oblique-lined Dottyback http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=186&title=oblique-lined-dottyback&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=186&amp;title=oblique-lined-dottyback&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Cypho_purpurascens.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Cypho_purpurascens.jpg" alt="41Cypho_purpurascens.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cypho purpurascens Max. size: 7.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 40 m Distribution: Western Pacific = from the Great Barrier Reef and Papua New Guinea east to Tonga. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-24; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 13-15. Lower lip either uninterrupted at symphysis or with weak interruption only. Caudal fin rounded; upper part with 6 (5-7) procurrent rays and 8 principal rays. Lateral line with anterodorsal series of 23 - 32 (usually 25 - 29) tubed scales extending from gill opening, and a peduncular series of 3 - 9 (usually 5 - 7) tubed scales. Dorsal and anal fins without distinct scaly sheaths. Male Oblique-lined Dottybacks are bright red overall with black on the posterior edge of the scales, a blue ring that partially encircles the eyes and one to three black ocelli (eye spots) on the dorsal fin. Females are gray anteriorly, with an area of orange in the middle of the body and yellow toward the tail. Biology: A cryptic species found in or near holes of coral and rock reefs, occurring on tide pools, lagoonal reefs, and reef slopes. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species can be quite aggressive and will attack smaller docile fish. It can be kept with Damsels, larger wrasses, and shrimp gobies in a roomier tank with a lot of hiding spots and live rock. In smaller systems, this species can be lethal to the smaller fish. If keeping the Oblique-lined Dottyback with less aggressive fish, then a few things can be done. Add the Oblique-lined Dottyback last, provide a larger tank with a lot of live rock and hiding spots, avoid keeping with fish of the same shape and coloration (red), or other dottybacks. This species can be kept in pairs or small groups (i.e. 2 females with 1 male), but the tank needs to be a larger size with a large amount of live rock, holes, and crevices. The Oblique-lined Dottyback will eat small ornamental shrimp and tubeworms. mojoreef Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:20:33 +0000 Blackcap Basslet http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=28&title=blackcap-basslet&cat=504 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=28&amp;title=blackcap-basslet&amp;cat=504"><img title="41Blackcap_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/504/thumbs/41Blackcap_basslet.jpg" alt="41Blackcap_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Gramma melacara Common Names: Blackcap Basslet, Blackcap Gramma Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; Ref. 7251) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 11 - 60 m; Temperature 22 - 27ºC Distribution: Western Central Atlantic = West Indies including the Bahamas and Central America. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9 Biology: A solitary species found on nearly vertical cliffs and drop-offs beyond outer reefs. Often upside-down. Retreats into recesses when alarmed. Has been reared in captivity. Most common in water more than 30 m deep. Gradually replaces G. loreto at depths of 15-30m Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places. This species is durable and has a similar temperment as the Royal Gramma (G. loreto). The male Blackcap Basslet can get pretty aggressive once it is established and comfortable in the tank, especially around his cave/hiding spot. This species is generally more on the shy side vs. G. loreto, and should be kept with less aggressive tankmates. The Blackcap Basslet does better with less-intense lighting. As long as there are plenty of hiding places, and the tank is of a larger size, this species can be kept in groups (1 med. and 2 smaller). They may eat small shrimps. mojoreef Thu, 23 Dec 2004 18:00:56 +0000