Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Fri, 20 Jul 2018 21:52:40 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 004 http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1034&title=004&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1034&amp;title=004&amp;cat=512"><img title="004.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/004.JPG" alt="004.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance ecobalance Fri, 20 Jul 2007 07:48:04 +0000 Flame Hawk http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=885&title=flame-hawk&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=885&amp;title=flame-hawk&amp;cat=512"><img title="Flame-hawk.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/Flame-hawk.jpg" alt="Flame-hawk.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Casperson<br /><br />1 comment Casperson Sun, 29 Jan 2006 23:21:15 +0000 Cryptic Hawk http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=699&title=cryptic-hawk&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=699&amp;title=cryptic-hawk&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Cryptic_wrasse.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Cryptic_wrasse.jpg" alt="41Cryptic_wrasse.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pteragogus cryptus Max. size: 9.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 67 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea; Indonesia to Samoa, north to the Philippines, south to the Great Barrier Reef; Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 9. Has 10 dorsal spines, lacks distinct vertical barring or longitudinal lines, and has yellow or reddish edged ocellus on the gill cover. First 3 dorsal fin spines elongated in adults. Biology: A secretive species occurring on coral reefs where it hides among soft corals and benthic algae. Feeds on benthic invertebrates. Rarely found in the aquarium trade mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 04:31:37 +0000 Swallowtail Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=374&title=swallowtail-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=374&amp;title=swallowtail-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Swallowtail_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Swallowtail_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Swallowtail_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cyprinocirrhites polyactis Common Names: Swallowtail Hawkfish, Lyretail Hawkfish Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 132 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to the western Pacific. Southeast Atlantic: southeast coast of South Africa. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7. Body mottled light yellowish to orange-brown; juveniles orange-gold. Biology: Found on steep slopes and around small coral heads exposed to currents. Hovers several meters above the bottom and feeds mainly on pelagic crustaceans, copepods, and other animals of the plankton. Aquarium Care: The Swallowtail Hawkfish will spend most of the time resting on the reef structure, unless there is considerable amounts of water movement, at which the fish will often swim agains the current. Sometimes it will hide at the base and under tentacles of large anemones or LPS. This species is not as aggressive as other hawkfish, however, it will dominate smaller tankmates. May act aggressively towards more passive fish introduced to the community after the Swallowtail Hawkfish has an established territory. Keep only one per tank (unless an extra large tank, and add them simulatneously). Is a threat to small delicate shrimps. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:57 +0000 Twospotted Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=375&title=twospotted-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=375&amp;title=twospotted-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Ambim_u6.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Ambim_u6.jpg" alt="41Ambim_u6.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Amblycirrhitus bimacula Max. size: 8.5 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 0 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Mangaréva, Tuamoto Islands and the Hawaiian Islands, north to Taiwan; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Irregular dark bars on body which may be broken into spots; 2 narrow diagonal bars on cheek; opercle and base of soft dorsal with large ocellated black spot. Biology: A secretive species remaining in or near interstices of rock, coral, or rubble. Moderately common in seaward reefs in areas exposed to moderate surge or currents. Aquarium Care: This species will do well in a fish and reef tank. Due to its secretive nature, it will be seen less often than other hawkfish. The Twospotted Hawkfish is not as aggressive as others in its family, but it will defend its hiding spot from intruders. It may also attack other fish, such as sand perches, gobies and blennies. Provide plenty of live rock for the Twospotted Hawkfish, as it will find some natural food items. When kept with aggressive feeders, this species may not get food because of its reclusiveness. May eat small ornamental shrimps and tubeworms, but no threat to inverts. May agitate sessile inverts by perching on them. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:57 +0000 Whitespot Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=376&title=whitespot-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=376&amp;title=whitespot-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Whitespot_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Whitespot_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Whitespot_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracirrhites hemistictus Common Names: Whitespot Hawkfish, Halfspotted Hawkfish Max. size: 29.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Cocos-Keeling and Christmas Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean to the Line, Marquesan, and Ducie islands; north to Bonin Islands, south to New Caledonia and Austral Islands; throughout Micronesia. Absent from most large continental islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Occurs in two basic color morphs: a light phase with a broad white longitudinal band and a maroon to black phase (Paracirrhites polystictus) with a conspicuous white blotch on each side. Biology: An uncommon species that inhabits exposed reef fronts and outer reef slopes to a depth of about 18 m where it perches on rocks and corals. Absent from most large continental islands. Aquarium Care: This species is big, hardy, and predatory. It is aggressive towards fish with similar behavior and those introduced after it is established. The Whitespot Hawkfish should not be housed with invertebrates, and does best when kept with larger more aggressive species, such as Triggers, Large Surgeonfish, and Large Angelfish. One per tank (unless a male-female pair, simultaneously introduced to an extra large tank) mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:57 +0000 Splendid Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=372&title=splendid-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=372&amp;title=splendid-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Cispl_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Cispl_u0.jpg" alt="41Cispl_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Notocirrhitus splendens (also referenced as Cirrhitus splendens) Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: temperate Distribution: Southwest Pacific: Australia and Lord Howe, Norfolk and the Kermadec Islands. Biology: Inhabits seaward reefs, at the bases of coral heads or on hard bottom. Aquarium Care: This species is not seen often in the hobby. Provide perching spots, crevices and ledges. Feeds on fish and crustaceans in the wild, so it may eat small fish and shrimp in the aquarium. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:56 +0000 Spottedtail Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=373&title=spottedtail-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=373&amp;title=spottedtail-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Spottedtail_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Spottedtail_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Spottedtail_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitichthys calliurus Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Gulf of Aden to the Gulf of Oman. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Orange with dusky blotches, becoming blackish posteriorly; caudal fin white with small blackish spots and a black posterior border. Biology: Found on coral heads and rocky substrate waiting for prey to pass by. Aquarium Care: This species is rare in the hobby. The Spottedtail Hawkfish should not be kept with smaller, non-aggressive species (i.e. dartfish, small gobies, small anthia, flasher wrasses, and other small wrasses), especially in smaller tanks. If keeping this fish with less aggressive tankmates, then it should be introduced last to the community. It may eat ornamental shrimp. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:56 +0000 Stocky Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=371&title=stocky-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=371&amp;title=stocky-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Stocky_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Stocky_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Stocky_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitus pinnulatus Common Names: Stocky Hawkfish, Chinese Hawkfish Max. size: 30.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 3 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Marquesan Islands and Mangaréva, north to southern Japan and the Hawaiian Islands, south to the Kermadec and Rapa Islands; throughout Micronesia. Southeast Atlantic: southeast coast of South Africa. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Light brown, whitish below, with white and dark brown spots. Biology: Inhabits reef fronts and rocky shorelines exposed to moderate to strong surge to depths of about 3 m. Feeds primarily on crabs, also takes other crustaceans, small fishes, sea urchins or brittle stars. Aquarium Care: This species will remain hidden much of the day, peering out from crevices. The Stocky Hawkfish will accept live and prepared foods, but will also make short work of most shrimps and small fishes. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 15:00:55 +0000 Longnose Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=368&title=longnose-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=368&amp;title=longnose-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Longnose_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Longnose_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Longnose_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Oxycirrhites typus Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 100 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 26°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea to the Hawaiian Islands, north to southern Japan, south to New Caledonia; throughout Micronesia. Eastern Pacific: Gulf of California to northern Colombia and the Galapagos Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Inhabits steep outer reef slopes exposed to strong currents where it lives in large gorgonians and black corals. Feeds on small benthic or planktonic crustaceans. Lays demersal eggs. Uncommon to rare in most areas. Aquarium Care: This species is more suited for the mini-reef tank compared to other hawkfish. It will occasionally eat ornamental shrimp, such as cleaner shrimp and dancing shrimp, and may act aggressively towards fish with elongate bodies (i.e. firefish and dart gobies). The Longnose Hawkfish will adapt to most settings, but looks the most natural when provided gorgonians or similar decor to perch on. It can be kept in male-female pairs, but they should be introduced at the same time. Separate fighting individuals. This species tends to be picked on by other hawkfish, and has been known to jump out of uncovered tanks. Feed a variety of meaty foods. <br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:16 +0000 Redspotted Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=369&title=redspotted-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=369&amp;title=redspotted-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Redspotted_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Redspotted_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Redspotted_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Amblycirrhitus pinos Max. size: 9.5 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 46 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Atlantic: southern Florida and Texas (USA), Bahamas and throughout the Caribbean Sea to northern South America. Eastern Atlantic: St. Helena. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. White interspaces between first four dark bars bisected by narrow yellowish brown bars. Biology: Moderately common in rocky areas and among rubble, often in crevices and shallow caves. Usually lies at rest on the substrate. Feeds primarily on small crustaceans, particularly copepods, shrimps and shrimp larvae, crabs and crab larvae as well as polychaetes. Aquarium Care: This species is shy when first introduced to a new system. Once the Redspotted Hawkfish is acclimated, it may push around newly introduced tankmates (more so in a smaller tank). If more than one is desired, provide a large tank, plenty of hiding places, introduce at the same time, and be certain they are not the same size. Will spend time perching in the open. may eat smaller shrimps. Feed a variety of meaty foods. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:16 +0000 Six-banded Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=370&title=six-banded-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=370&amp;title=six-banded-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Six-banded_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Six-banded_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Six-banded_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Isocirrhitus sexfasciatus Max. size: 7.8 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Marshall and Tuamoto Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6 Biology: Inhabits the surge zone of reef margins and fronts. Aquarium Care: May behave aggressively toward fish introduced to the community after it establishes a territory. This species may also be a threat to small shrimp. Provide plenty of perching sites. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:16 +0000 Coral Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=365&title=coral-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=365&amp;title=coral-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Coral_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Coral_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Coral_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitichthys oxycephalus Common Names: Coral Hawkfish, Pixy Hawkfish Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 40 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea south to East London, South Africa and east to the Marquesan Islands, north to the Mariana Islands, south to New Caledonia. Eastern Pacific: Gulf of California to Colombia and the Galapagos Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12-13; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Highly variable in color from pale with grey to black blotches to pink with bright red blotches. Pale with horizontal rows of subquadrate dark brown spots; a row of smaller spots on LL between larger spots; small dark brown spots on head. Biology: Inhabits areas of rich coral growth and clear water of lagoon, channel, or seaward reefs from below the surge zone to depths of at least 40 m. Rests on, in, or beneath hard or soft corals. Feeds on crustaceans and small fishes. Males are territorial and haremic. Aquarium Care: Even though this species is small, it is quite belligerent. Do not keep with smaller and less aggressive tankmates. It will pick on fish such as, grammas, pygmy angelfish, small dottybacks, small butterflyfish, sand perches, gobies and dartfish. To keep the Coral Hawkfish with less aggressive species, it should be the last fish introduced. Will eat ornamental shrimps, however, it won't bother corals. Feed a variety of meaty foods. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:15 +0000 Dwarf Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=366&title=dwarf-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=366&amp;title=dwarf-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Cifal_u8.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Cifal_u8.jpg" alt="41Cifal_u8.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitichthys falco Common Names: Dwarf Hawkfish, Falco's Hawkfish Max. size: 7.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 46 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Maldives to Samoa, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the southern Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Numerous short filaments at the tip of each dorsal spine. Thickened and elongate lower pectoral rays. Biology: Shallow coastal to outer reef flats and slopes to 45 m depth. Common inhabitant of coral reefs, typically resting at the bases of coral heads. Studies indicate that it is haremic and spawns nightly. Occasionally in pairs. Aquarium Care: This species is durable, and a good choice for begginer aquarists. It is a smaller species and less of a threat to other fish in the community, when compared to other Hawkfish. Should not be housed with non-aggressive fish such as dartfish, small gobies, flasher wrasses, and some anthias. It is best to introduce the Dwarf Hawkfish last in a tank with less-aggressive fish. This species will spend more time sitting on the bottom of the tank, than on the tank decor. will eat small ornamental shrimps. Feed a variety of meaty foods. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:15 +0000 Flame Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=367&title=flame-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=367&amp;title=flame-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Nearm_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Nearm_u0.jpg" alt="41Nearm_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Neocirrhites armatus Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 10 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Ryukyu Islands to the Line Islands and Mangaréva, south to the Great Barrier Reef and the Austral Islands; Caroline, Mariana, and the Wake islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7 Biology: Common along surge-swept reef fronts and submarine terraces to a depth of about 11 m. Usually seen hiding among branches of live corals (Stylophora mordax, Pocillopora elegans, P. eydouxi, or P. verrucosa). Retreats deep into the coral when approached. Highly priced aquarium fish, requires well-oxygenated water and fades in captivity. Aquarium Care: This species is one of the more suitable for an aquarium with invertebrates. It will, on occasion, act aggressively to other bottom-dwelling fish, and those introduced to the community after it is established. In the captive environment, the Flame Hawkfish has been observed to snatch upended hermit crabs, snails and limpets out of their shells and eat them. Some even knock the snails off the glass. Christmas Tree Worms, ornamental shrimps, cleaner shrimps, and anemone shrimps are all at risk of being eaten. Does best when housed in a tank with larger or more-aggressive fish (i.e. Larger wrasses, puffers, triggers, large angelfish). Feed a variety of meaty foods, including pigment-enriched foods to help maintain the Flame Hawk's coloration. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:15 +0000 Yellow Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=362&title=yellow-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=362&amp;title=yellow-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Yellow_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Yellow_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Yellow_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitichthys aureus Common Names: Yellow Hawkfish, Golden Hawkfish Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: India east to Sagami Bay in Japan and south to China. A new record was reported from southern Indonesia. Morphology: Distinguished from C. aprinus by the bright yellow coloration when viewed underwater. Biology: Occurs on rocky cliffs in deep water. Also inhabits muddy substrates in protected bays where wave action has no influence. Aquarium Care: The Yellow Hawkfish is not common in the hobby. It is hardy but can be aggressive. In the wild this species defends a larger territory than others in its genus, and is less site-attached. They also have the ability to change sex in either direction (male to female or female to male). May eat ornamental shrimp and small fishes. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:14 +0000 Arc-eye Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=363&title=arc-eye-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=363&amp;title=arc-eye-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Arc-eye_hawkfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Arc-eye_hawkfish.jpg" alt="41Arc-eye_hawkfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracirrhites arcatus Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 91 m Climate: tropical; 25 - 27°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Hawaiian, Line and Mangaréva islands, north to southern Japan, south to Australia and Rapa; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Occurs in a variety of color morphs, but always has a distinctive ring extending around and behind the eye. Biology: Occurs in lagoon and seaward reefs from 1 to at least 33 m where it found on heads of small branching corals, e.g. Stylophora, Pocillopora, Acropora. Feeds mainly on shrimps, small fishes, crabs, and other crustaceans. Aquarium Care: This species does best with tankmates that can hold their own against bullies. It will act aggressively to fish that are brought into the community after it is established (even when larger in size). Except for possibly some mechanical damage, the Arc-eye Hawkfish won't harm corals. They will, however, eat small crabs, cleaner, boxer, anemone, and Saron shrimps, along with smaller fish. One per tank, unless a known male-female pair is acquired. Feed meaty foods, including marine fish, mysid shrimp, crustacean flesh, and frozen preparations. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:14 +0000 Redbarred Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=364&title=redbarred-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=364&amp;title=redbarred-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Cifas_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Cifas_u0.jpg" alt="41Cifas_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Cirrhitops fasciatus Common Names: Redbarred Hawkfish, Redbar Hawkfish, Blood Red Hawkfish, Banded Hawkfish Max. size: 12.7 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 30 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Madagascar, Réunion, Mauritius, Japan, and Hawaii. Biology: Occurs on seaward reefs, in areas of moderate to rich coral growth. Typically at the bases of coral heads on hard bottoms. Feeds about equally on small fishes, shrimps and crabs; to a lesser extent, on sipunculids and zooplankton (larval shrimps, copepods, amphipods and larval gastropods). Aquarium Care: Not as available in the hobby as other hawkfish species. The Redbarred Hawkfish is very durable, but is a threat to small fishes and crustaceans. Is best to keep this species in a tank with larger or more aggressive fish (i.e. angelfish, larger pseudochromoids, larger wrasses, puffers, and triggers). Feed a variety of meaty foods, including pigment-enriched foods to help maintain its coloration. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:14 +0000 Blackside Hawkfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=361&title=blackside-hawkfish&cat=512 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=361&amp;title=blackside-hawkfish&amp;cat=512"><img title="41Pafor_ug.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/512/thumbs/41Pafor_ug.jpg" alt="41Pafor_ug.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Paracirrhites forsteri Common Names: Blackside Hawkfish, Freckled Hawkfish, Forster's Hawkfish Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 35 m Climate: tropical; 24 - 27°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Hawaiian, Line, Marquesan and Ducie islands, north to southern Japan, south to New Caledonia and the Austral Islands; throughout Micronesia and also known from the Society Islands. Unknown from the Persian and Oman gulfs. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Body yellowish with broad blackish stripe on upper side; head and anterior part of body with small dark reddish spots. Color changes with growth as well as varies among adults. In Oceania, juveniles are a golden green dorsally and white ventrally; in continental areas juveniles may be red dorsally. The maroon and yellow phase was originally described as a distinct species, P. typee. Biology: Inhabits clear lagoon or seaward reefs to at least 33 m depth, but may venture very deep. Occurs openly on coral and soft-bottom habitats, occasionally in pairs. Tends to perch on outermost branches of Stylophora, Pocillopora, and Acropora corals. Feeds mainly on small fishes and crustaceans, sometimes on shrimps and is territorial and haremic. Aquarium Care: This species is aggressive toward fish with similar behavior, and those introduced to the community after it is established. It is highly predatory and a voracious fish eater. Best kept with Large Angelfish, Triggers, Large Surgeonfish, and other species that can't be intimidated. Keep only one per tank. The Blackside Hawkfish is not a threat to sessile inverts, but it will eat small fish and ornamental crustaceans. mojoreef Sun, 26 Dec 2004 14:56:13 +0000