Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:49:06 -0500 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 Blue_Face_Show http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1107&title=blue-face-show&cat=500 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1107&amp;title=blue-face-show&amp;cat=500"><img title="Blue_Face_Show.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/500/thumbs/Blue_Face_Show.jpg" alt="Blue_Face_Show.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Thu, 02 Dec 2010 12:46:06 -0600 Bengal Sargent Major Damselfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=803&title=bengal-sargent-major-damselfish&cat=508 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=803&amp;title=bengal-sargent-major-damselfish&amp;cat=508"><img title="41Abengalensis.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/508/thumbs/41Abengalensis.jpg" alt="41Abengalensis.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Abudefduf bengalensis Max. size: 17.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine ; depth range 1 - 6 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: eastern Indian Ocean, north to Japan, south to Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13-15; Anal spines: 2; Anal soft rays: 13-14. Large adults recognized by the rounded tail with pale margin. Has narrow dark bands and lacks peduncular spot that distinguishes this species form similar ones. Similar to A. vaigiensis and A. sexfasciatus but has more black bars (6-7 versus 5). Biology: Occurs singly or in small groups in inshore reef and lagoon environments. Feeds on algae, gastropods, and small crabs. Highly territorial Aquarium Care:Most damselfishes are extremely hardy, colorful, lively, and inexpensive. They are generally very territorial and will eat most foods. It is recommended they not be added to community aquariums until after all the more peaceful fishes have been placed into the system.Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C). Natural diet consists of benthic invertebrate, such as crabs. Can be quite aggressive. Requires a meaty diet with some algae and two or three feedings per day. Rarely seen in the trade and probably better left in the wild. mojoreef Mon, 17 Jan 2005 09:08:08 -0600 Blue Barred Ribbon Gobie http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=804&title=blue-barred-ribbon-gobie&cat=509 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=804&amp;title=blue-barred-ribbon-gobie&amp;cat=509"><img title="41Oxcya_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/509/thumbs/41Oxcya_u1.jpg" alt="41Oxcya_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Oxymetopon cyanoctenosum Common Names: Bluebarred Ribbon Goby, Razor Goby Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Western Pacific: Indonesia and Philippines. Biology: Found on deep mud slopes. Lives in pairs in burrows Aquarium Care: This species is a recluse that is best housed in a tank with other docile species. If kept in a tank with more aggressive tankmates, it will hide continouously and starve. The Blue-barred Ribbon Goby requires ample swimming space and good hiding spots, such as a flat rock on live sand with a hollow underneath. It is easily startled by movements of human observers. Place tank in a low traffic area, move slowly when fish is out and do not turn off all lights suddenly. Will spend more time in the open if the tank has dim lighting. Keep tank covered, as this species is prone to jumping. Live brine may be needed to induce a feeding response. Try to get the fish to accept finely chopped or shaved froesh or frozen seafoods, frozen preparations for carnivores, and mysis. A refugium may be beneficial. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Mon, 17 Jan 2005 09:08:08 -0600 Scribbled Angelfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=802&title=scribbled-angelfish&cat=501 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=802&amp;title=scribbled-angelfish&amp;cat=501"><img title="41image001.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/501/thumbs/41image001.jpg" alt="41image001.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: [i]Chaetodontoplus duboulayi[/i] Max. size: 28.0 cm TL (male/unsexed), ~11 inches Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range - 20 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Indo-West Pacific = northern Australia and parts of Indonesia, southward to Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 21 Biology: Inhabits coastal and inner reef areas with rubble, soft bottoms, or open flat bottom areas with rock, coral, sponge, and seawhip outcrops. May be found in small groups. Feeds on sponges and tunicates. Forms pairs or small groups. Occasionally exported through the aquarium trade Aquarium Care: Provide good hiding spots and nice swimming room. Scribbled Angelfish will nip at Tridacnid clams, LPS, zoanthids, and may eat soft corals. It will also graze on diatoms and some filamentous algae. A good aquarium fish, and once adjusted can become quite rambunctious. Photo Credit ©Bob Fenner mojoreef Mon, 17 Jan 2005 08:51:50 -0600 Twospot Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=795&title=twospot-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=795&amp;title=twospot-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias bimaculatus Common Names: Twospot Anthias, Twinspot Anthias Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: East Africa, Maldives and Indonesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Displays different or stronger color patterns when living together with similar looking species to enhance recognition by females which may lead to further speciation. Biology: Inhabits deep coastal drop-offs. In Java Sea, taken only in dead reef areas in somewhat turbid water. Closely related species such as P. pleurotaenia and P. bimaculatus may spawn at the same time and produce accidental hybrids. Aquarium Care: In order to thrive in captivity, the Twospot Anthias requires plenty of swimming room, good hiding spots, and good water quality. Not suited to the shallow water tank, but does best in a deep water tank with dim lighting. This species should be housed with non-aggressive tankmates. If the Twospot Anthias gets picked on by other species in the community, it will fail to acclimate. This species is difficult to feed, and my require live brine shrimp to get a feeding response. Upon acclimation, this fish will hide for several days to a week. Once comfortable in its surroundings, it may show aggression towards other anthias and other zooplankton feeders. Unless a very large tank, this species should be kept one per tank. To house a group of Twospot Anthias, keep 1 male with 5+ females. Due to collection in deep water, choose tankmates carefully by observing their swimming behavior in the water column. Does best in deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 18:10:05 -0600 Townsend's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=794&title=townsend-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=794&amp;title=townsend-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" alt="41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias townsendi Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine; depth range 15 - 63 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Persian Gulf to southern Oman and southern Iran. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8 Biology: Found on rocky bottom. Aquarium Care: Keep only one male per tank. Provide plenty of water movement, hiding places, and non-aggressive tankmates to make acclimation easier. Very similar to P. taeniatus, except P. townsendi males have a crimson red semicircular band on the outer edge of the tail, which is bordered by luminescent blue bands. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 18:00:58 -0600 Stocky Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=793&title=stocky-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=793&amp;title=stocky-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias hypselosoma Common Names: Stocky Anthias, Pink Anthias, Truncate Anthias Max. size: 19.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 6 - 50 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Maldives to Samoa, north to Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Plain pink but males display with intense color. Males have a red spot on the spinous portion of the dorsal fin. Juveniles and females lace this dorsal spot, but their caudal fin has red upper and lower tips and a narrow red edge. Males have a truncated caudal fin (posterior edge is rounded), although males may have thin streamers present on the upper tip. Females have a slightly emarginate caudal fin. Biology: Usually occurs in groups on well-protected reefs of lagoons or bays. Aquarium Care: This is a hardy species that needs plenty of hiding places, good water movement, and non-aggressive tankmates, inorder to make acclimation easier. Keep one male per tank. Can be kept in small groups in very large tanks (1 male only). The Stocky Anthias can be kept in both shallow water or deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:58:11 -0600 Red-cheeked Fairy Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=792&title=red-cheeked-fairy-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=792&amp;title=red-cheeked-fairy-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias huchtii Common Names: Red-cheeked Fairy Anthias, Redcheek Anthias, Green Anthias, Threadfin Anthias, Red-cheeked Fairy Basslet Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); 6.0 cm TL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 30 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Moluccas and the Philippines to Vanuatu, south to the Great Barrier Reef; Palau in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Occurs singly or in small groups around coral outcrops of clear outer reef slopes. Males are territorial and haremic. Aquarium Care: This species is hardy and aggressive. Unless in a very large tank, it is best to keep solitary individuals. In this larger system, a group can consist of 1 male with 8+ females. Care must be taken when selecting females, to ensure they are not undergoing sex changes (if keeping with a male). The Red-cheeked Anthias should not be housed with other anthias species or peaceful zooplankton feeders, such as flasher wrasses, fairy wrasses, and dart gobies. Does well in both deep water and shallow water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:53:37 -0600 Redbar Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=791&title=redbar-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=791&amp;title=redbar-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias cooperi Common Names: Redbar Anthias, Cooper's Anthias, Silverstreak Anthias Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 91 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Samoa and the Line Islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Great Barrier Reef; Palau, Marshall and Mariana islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Males develop an incomplete crimson bar in the middle of their sides. Biology: Mostly found on open substrate with low reef and remote bommies in depths over 20 m. Juveniles maybe shallow in coastal reefs. Form small, loose aggregations along current-swept drop-offs. Aquarium Care: In order to help acclimate this species, provide plenty of hiding spots, good water movement, and non-aggressive tankmates. A less demanding species, that does better with reduced lighting and some sort of branching gorgonian (whether live or artificial). In a larger tank, the Redbar Anthias can be kept in small groups. Only one male per tank. This species does better with lower light than a normal shallow water tank, however, it might be acclimated to brighter light if provided shelter sites. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:49:48 -0600 Pseudanthias hiva http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=790&title=pseudanthias-hiva&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=790&amp;title=pseudanthias-hiva&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias hiva Max. size: 10.0 cm SL (male/unsexed); 6.0 cm SL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 34 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Marquesan Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7; Vertebrae: 26. Body depth 3-3.2 in SL; head length 3=3.2 in SL. No papillae on posterior edge of orbit. Front of upper lip of males without a prominent fleshy protuberance. Tenth dorsal spine longest, 2.05-2.3 in HL. Color of females orange shading to pink ventrally, the scales dorsally on body with dusky yellow centers, those ventrally with yellow; a narrow orange red bar on body below 8th dorsal spine ; a yellow-orange band, bordered below by violet, from lower part of eye to pectoral-fin base; dorsal fin orange with a violet margin; front half of anal fin magenta with a violet margin, the posterior half yellow, the lobe tips bright red. Color of body of males lavender-red dorsally, shading to pale lavender ventrally, the scales below lateral line with yellow centers; head orange-red above a bluish white line from lower edge of orbit to lower base of pectoral fin, pale orange below; dorsal fin translucent orange-yellow with a lavender margin; anal fin translucent lavender with a row of small yellow spots on membranes; caudal fin red, the upper and lower edges and filaments pink; pelvic fins light red. Scales above lateral line to 2nd dorsal spine 6, middle dorsal spines 3.5. Biology: Specimens collected over rocky substrata, usually at depths greater than 25 m; with the use of rotenone and quinaldine. Aquarium Care: Feeds on zooplankton. Not usually seen in the hobby. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:49:47 -0600 Pseudanthias flavicauda http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=789&title=pseudanthias-flavicauda&cat=500 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=789&amp;title=pseudanthias-flavicauda&amp;cat=500"><img title="41Pseudanthias_flavicauda.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/500/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_flavicauda.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_flavicauda.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Pseudanthias flavicauda Max. size: 6.6 cm SL (male/unsexed); 5.6 cm SL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 30 - 61 m Distribution: Gazetteer Western Pacific: off islands of Fiji. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7; Vertebrae: 26. Body depth 3.1-3.3 in SL; head length 3.15-3.3 in SL. Posterior edge of orbit without papillae. Caudal fin deeply emarginate to lunate, the caudal concavity 1.05-2.5 in HL. Body of males magenta with a large predominantly yellow area on back between base of 4th dorsal spine and 4th or 5th dorsal soft rays; head pink, suffused with yellow dorsally, with a pink-edged yellow band from eye to pectoral-fin base; fins mainly yellow except anal which is lavender with a yellow band; its upper lip slightly fleshy and finely papillae anteriorly, but not developed to a protuberance; its third dorsal spine moderately elongate, 1.5-1.95 in HL. Females orange-pink, shading to pink ventrally, the scales dorsally on body with dusky yellow centers; caudal fin bright yellow mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:40:44 -0600 Pseudanthias carlsoni http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=788&title=pseudanthias-carlsoni&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=788&amp;title=pseudanthias-carlsoni&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias carlsoni Max. size: 7.4 cm SL (male/unsexed); 6.21 cm SL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 37 - 73 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Loyalty Islands. Except those from Fiji, specimens collected are not listed as paratypes because of the difference in gill-raker counts. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7; Vertebrae: 26. Body moderately deep, 2.7-3.1 in SL. Head length 3.05-3.2 in SL. Posterior edge of orbit without papillae. Caudal fin deeply emarginate to lunate, the caudal concavity 1.5-2.15 in head. Males without a fleshy protuberance at front of upper lip; third dorsal spine moderately elongate, 1.6-1.85 in HL. Females in life orange-pink with a vertically elongate dusky spot on each scale dorsally on body, the spots becoming yellow ventrally. Males pink, shading to orange anteriorly and pale lavender ventrally, with a red bar on side below 8th and 9th dorsal spines, the same yellow band on the head as females but brighter and a conspicuous red spot in dorsal fin between 6th and 7th or 8th spines. Biology: Occurs on moderately deep reefs Aquarium Care: Originating from the moderately deep reef, this species will do best in a dimly lit aquarium. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:37:06 -0600 Dispar Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=787&title=dispar-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=787&amp;title=dispar-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41dispar_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41dispar_anthias.jpg" alt="41dispar_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias dispar Common Names: Dispar Anthias, Redfin Anthias, Peach Anthias Max. size: 9.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 18 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Christmas Island to the Line Islands, north to the Yaeyama Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef, Fiji and Samoa; Palau, eastern Caroline Islands, and southern Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Replaced by Pseudanthias ignitus in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Male displays a bright red dorsal fin. Ventral fins greatly extended. Female orange with yellowish tail and a pink line from the tip of the snout angling down, passing through the lower part of the eye. Biology: Found at the upper-edge of steep outer reef slopes, with moderate currents. Occurs in large aggregations, of mixed sexes when feeding in currents sweeping the reef. Aquarium Care: This species is demanding and difficult to feed. It is also more likely to be picked on by more aggressive species in the aquarium. They are best kept in groups (1 male with 6+ females), in a large tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female/dominant of the group will often morph to take its place. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:27:15 -0600 One-stripe Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=786&title=one-stripe-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=786&amp;title=one-stripe-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41onestripe_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41onestripe_anthias.jpg" alt="41onestripe_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias fasciatus Common Names: One-stripe Anthias, Redstripe Anthias, Striped Anthias Max. size: 21.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 20 - 150 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: southern Japan to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Juveniles of this species lack the red lateral stripe. Biology: Found in or near caves and ledges of seaward reefs. Adults swim upside-down. Aquarium Care: Temperature 20-26ºC. This species should be provided a large cave or overhang in dim lighting. Suitable tankmates include cardinalfish, assessors, chromis, gobies, dart gobies, comets, and flasher wrasses. This species can be kept in small groups, but only one male per tank. Will not harm inverts. The One-stripe Anthias is prone to get decompression problems from collection in deeper water. Examine specimens for signs of problems (they should maintain their position in the water column). Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 17:19:06 -0600 Bicolor Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=785&title=bicolor-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=785&amp;title=bicolor-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41bicolor_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41bicolor_anthias.jpg" alt="41bicolor_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias bicolor Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 68 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Mauritius to the Hawaiian and Line islands, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Loyalty Islands; Marshall and Caroline islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Male has elongated swcond and theird dorsal spines, with yellow-tips that are used for display. Felames only have the third dorsal spine prolonged. Biology: Relatively uncommon inhabitant of lagoon patch reefs and outer reef slopes. Found in deep coastal to outer reef slopes, in current prone areas. It occurs in small groups above coral outcrops or near crevices or ledges. Aquarium Care: An easier to keep species, in which young anthias acclimate better than large adults. The Bicolor Anthias will not harm inverts, and will acclimate easier with less intense lighting (can be acclimated to higher lighting). If the Bicolor Anthias is introduced first, adults can be kept with fish that are moderately aggressive, such as surgeonfish, small to medium dottybacks, and pygmy angelfish. A group (1 male with 8+ females) can be kept in a very large tank. This species is prone to lose its coloration unless fed a diet with enriched foods that are high in carotenoids. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:58:57 -0600 Redspotted Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=770&title=redspotted-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=770&amp;title=redspotted-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Tetraodon_erythrotaenia.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Tetraodon_erythrotaenia.jpg" alt="41Tetraodon_erythrotaenia.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 3 - 57 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: northern Red Sea and Kenya; a recent emigrant to the Mediterranean Sea via the Suez Canal. Also reported from the Persian Gulf and Seychelles Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:47:53 -0600 Guinean puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=767&title=guinean-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=767&amp;title=guinean-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Sphoeroides_marmoratus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Sphoeroides_marmoratus.jpg" alt="41Sphoeroides_marmoratus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Sphoeroides_marmoratus Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine ; depth range - 100 m Distribution: Eastern Atlantic: Portugal to Angola. Biology: Inhabits shallow waters mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:47:52 -0600 Bullseye Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=768&title=bullseye-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=768&amp;title=bullseye-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Sphoeroides_annulatus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Sphoeroides_annulatus.jpg" alt="41Sphoeroides_annulatus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Sphoeroides annulatus Max. size: 44.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; brackish; marine ; depth range 0 - 11 m Distribution: Eastern Pacific: California, USA to Pisco, Peru and the Galapagos Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 7. Remarkable for its highly tortuous lateral line; its nostrils also rather peculiar. Biology: Found on soft bottom. Juveniles inhabit estuaries. Makes a loud grating noise Aquarium Care: Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:47:52 -0600 Torquigener flavimaculosus http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=769&title=torquigener-flavimaculosus&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=769&amp;title=torquigener-flavimaculosus&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Torquigener_flavimaculosus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Torquigener_flavimaculosus.jpg" alt="41Torquigener_flavimaculosus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Torquigener flavimaculosus Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 3 - 57 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: northern Red Sea and Kenya; a recent emigrant to the Mediterranean Sea via the Suez Canal. Also reported from the Persian Gulf and Seychelles mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:47:52 -0600 Milkspot Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=766&title=milkspot-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=766&amp;title=milkspot-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" alt="41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chelonodon patoca Max. size: 33.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; anadromous; freshwater; brackish; marine Distribution: Indo-Pacific: east coast of Africa down to Port Alfred, South Africa (including Madagascar) and as far east as the Admiralty Islands, New Britain and Trobiand Islands; southward to North Australia; northward to China and westward to India and the Gulf of Iran. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 8-10. Body covered with prickles. Biology: Occurs in coastal waters and enters the lower reaches of rivers and lagoons. Usually found around the mouths of rivers or in brackish mangrove estuaries and sometimes penetrates fresh water, but is never found more than a few km from the sea mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:47:51 -0600 Takifugu niphobles http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=764&title=takifugu-niphobles&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=764&amp;title=takifugu-niphobles&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Takifugu_niphobles.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Takifugu_niphobles.jpg" alt="41Takifugu_niphobles.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Takifugu niphobles Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine Distribution: Northwest Pacific: Japan and southern Korea. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:31 -0600 Milkspotted Pufferfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=765&title=milkspotted-pufferfish&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=765&amp;title=milkspotted-pufferfish&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" alt="41Chelonodon_patoca.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Chelonodon patoca Max. size: 33.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment:   reef-associated; anadromous; freshwater; brackish; marine Climate: tropical; 23 - 28°C Distribution: Indo-Pacific: east coast of Africa down to Port Alfred, South Africa (including Madagascar) and as far east as the Admiralty Islands, New Britain and Trobiand Islands; southward to North Australia; northward to China and westward to India and the Gulf of Iran. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 8-10. Body covered with prickles (Ref. 559). Biology: Occurs in coastal waters and enters the lower reaches of rivers and lagoons. Usually found around the mouths of rivers or in brackish mangrove estuaries and sometimes penetrates fresh water, but is never found more than a few km from the sea. Considered a delicacy in Japan Aquarium Care: Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:31 -0600 Tyler'sToby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=763&title=tyler-27stoby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=763&amp;title=tyler-27stoby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_tyleri.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_tyleri.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_tyleri.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster tyleri Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 40 m Distribution: Indian Ocean: Mauritius, Comoros, Maldives, and Seychelles. Replaced in the western Pacific by the closely related Canthigaster leoparda Lubbock &amp; Allen 1979. Biology: Inhabits clear lagoon and seaward reefs. Secretive, often in holes or under ledges. Feeds on a variety of algae, sponges and invertebrates Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:30 -0600 Caribbean sharpnose-puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=760&title=caribbean-sharpnose-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=760&amp;title=caribbean-sharpnose-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_rostrata.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_rostrata.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_rostrata.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster rostrata Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 40 m Distribution: Western Central Atlantic: South Carolina, USA and Bermuda to Tobago and the Lesser Antilles. All Canthigaster specimens so far recorded from Madeira belong to Canthigaster capistrata. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9. Distinguished from all other Atlantic species by a short upper dark longitudinal stripe, presence of few spots on flank and dorsum, and absence of a conspicuous (larger than eye) spot on the dorsum. The upper dark longitudinal stripe extends from caudal-fin dorsal margin to the vertical through dorsal-fin base. Although a horizontal line of dark spots extends anterior to the anterior portion of the horizontal dark stripe in some specimens, and sometimes even surpasses the dorsal fin base, this line of spots never forms a continuous stripe. Also distinguished by the absence of vertically oriented bars on the caudal fin and by the presence of bars on the snout. Biology: Inhabits reefs and marginal habitats such as seagrass beds. Diet consists of seagrass, sponges, crabs and other crustaceans, mollusks, polychaete worms, sea urchins, starfishes, hydroids and algae Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:29 -0600 Bicolor Toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=761&title=bicolor-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=761&amp;title=bicolor-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_smithae.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_smithae.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_smithae.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster smithae Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 20 - 37 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Agalega Islands, Mauritius to Durban, South Africa. Also Maldives Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9. Caudal peduncle and sides behind pectoral fins covered with dark dots; dark lines around eye; sometimes with a dark stripe on midventral line of belly; fins translucent with dark-edged rays; upper and lower edge of caudal fin dark. Biology: Inhabits outer reef slopes Aqaurium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:29 -0600 Spotted sharpnose Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=762&title=spotted-sharpnose-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=762&amp;title=spotted-sharpnose-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_solandri.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_solandri.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_solandri.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster solandri Max. size: 11.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range - 36 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Line and Tuamoto Islands, north to Ryukyu Islands, south to New Caledonia and Tonga; throughout Micronesia; strays to the Hawaiian Islands. Population from the Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea, Queensland, and Belau differs in coloration (formerly Canthigaster papua); replaced by Canthigaster margaritata in the Red Sea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 8-10. Ocellus at base of dorsal fin; dark lines radiating from eye; caudal fin brown with pale spots, outer rows may form wavy lines. Biology: Inhabits intertidal reef flats, lagoon and seaward reefs. Occurs over open barren areas, also among corals and under ledges. Often found in pairs, sometimes in small groups. Feeds mainly on filamentous red and green algae and coralline red algae but also on corals, tunicates, mollusks, echinoderms, polychaetes, crustaceans and bryozoans. Common Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon filamentous algae, coralline, and benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings and may nip tankmates fins. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:29 -0600 Valentinni's sharpnose puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=758&title=valentinni-27s-sharpnose-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=758&amp;title=valentinni-27s-sharpnose-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_valentini.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_valentini.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_valentini.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster valentini Max. size: 11.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 55 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea south to Durban, South Africa and east to the Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9. Side with two prominent dark bars extending to belly. Biology: Found among coral heads and rocks of subtidal lagoon and seaward reefs. Feeds mainly on filamentous green and red algae, tunicates, and on smaller amounts of corals, bryozoans, polychaetes, echinoderms, mollusks, and brown and coralline red algae. Forms shoals (10-100 or more) often with the filefish, Paraluteres prionurus (about 5% of shoal) mimicking C. valentini to protect it from predators. Territorial and haremic; males spawn with a different female each day Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 to 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate and algae. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings and may nip tankmates fins. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:28 -0600 Pygmy Toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=759&title=pygmy-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=759&amp;title=pygmy-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Capyg_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Capyg_u0.jpg" alt="41Capyg_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Canthigaster pygmaea Max. size: 5.6 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Gazetteer Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs. Found hidden in holes. Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:28 -0600 Natal toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=756&title=natal-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=756&amp;title=natal-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_natalensis.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_natalensis.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_natalensis.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster_natalensis Max. size: 8.6 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine ; depth range 0 - 15 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Mozambique and South Africa to Reunion and Mauritius. Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:27 -0600 Shy Toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=757&title=shy-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=757&amp;title=shy-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_ocellicincta.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_ocellicincta.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_ocellicincta.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster ocellicincta Max. size: 6.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 10 - 53 m Distribution: Western Pacific: the Philippines, Indonesia, islands of Melanesia, and the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal soft rays: 9 Biology: Moves fleetingly from one hole of the reef to the other. Very secretive Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:39:27 -0600 Honeycomb Toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=754&title=honeycomb-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=754&amp;title=honeycomb-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_janthinoptera.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_janthinoptera.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_janthinoptera.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster janthinoptera Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa south to Transkei, South Africa and east to the Line, Marquesan, and Oeno islands, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island. Throughout Micronesia. Replaced by Canthigaster jactator in the Hawaiian Islands and Canthigaster punctatissimus in the tropical eastern Pacific. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9-10. Many white spots scattered on body. Biology: Occurs in clear lagoon and seaward reefs. Prefers sheltered areas in the form of holes in dead and living corals. Solitary or paired. Feeds on sponges, polychaetes, filamentous algae and on smaller quantities of tunicates, crustaceans, echinoderms and corals Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:49 -0600 Spotted sharpnosed puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=755&title=spotted-sharpnosed-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=755&amp;title=spotted-sharpnosed-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_punctatissima.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_punctatissima.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_punctatissima.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster punctatissima Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 3 - 21 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Guaymas, Mexico to Panama and the Galapagos Islands. Biology: Hides in shaded, protected recesses in rocky reefs, boulder strewn slopes and along walls. Carnivorous Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon filamentous algae, coralline, and benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings and may nip tankmates fins. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:49 -0600 Margarita Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=751&title=margarita-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=751&amp;title=margarita-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_margaritata.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_margaritata.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_margaritata.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster margaritata Max. size: 31.2 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range - 0 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea, Inhaca Island in Mozambique, Sri Lanka, and Ogasawara Islands. Biology: Common in tide pools near reefs and in shallow reef areas. Skin near dorsal and ventral ridge can be inflated, e.g. during territorial display among males Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 to 82°F (25 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate, algae, and sponges. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings and plenty of swimming space. Will chew on anything it can get into its mouth, including aquarium equipment. May need to be dewormed and have their teeth filed to prevent overgrowth, which will inhibit their ability to eat. Poisonous to eat. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:48 -0600 Hawaiian whitespotted Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=752&title=hawaiian-whitespottedpuffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=752&amp;title=hawaiian-whitespottedpuffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_jactator.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_jactator.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_jactator.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster jactator Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range - 30 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Hawaiian Islands. Biology: Commonly found on lagoon and seaward reefs. Feeds on sponges, algae, detritus, tunicates, polychaetes, bryozoans, sea urchins, brittle stars, crabs, peanut worms, shrimps, zoanthids, fishes, amphipods and foraminiferans. Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 70 - 79°F (21 - 26°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. Will nip tankmates fins. De-worming may be necessary and its teeth may also need trimming/filing. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:48 -0600 Leopard sharpnose puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=753&title=leopard-sharpnose-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=753&amp;title=leopard-sharpnose-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_leoparda.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_leoparda.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_leoparda.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster leoparda Max. size: 7.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 30 - 50 m Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean: Christmas Island. Western Pacific: Philippines, Ambon, and Guam. Replaced by Canthigaster tyleri in the Indian Ocean east to Ambon. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-9; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9 Biology: Rare in caves of steep drop-offs. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:48 -0600 Lantern Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=749&title=lantern-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=749&amp;title=lantern-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_epilampra.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_epilampra.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_epilampra.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Canthigaster epilampra Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 6 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean to the Hawaiian and Society islands, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to Tonga and Rarotonga. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9 Biology: Inhabits outer reef slopes, generally at depths greater than 24 m, but also seen below 6 m. Solitary or paired. Feeds on mollusks, echinoderms, brachiopods, and filamentous algae Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:47 -0600 Crowned Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=750&title=crowned-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=750&amp;title=crowned-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_coronata.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_coronata.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_coronata.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Canthigaster coronata Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 6 - 100 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea south to Sodwana Bay, South Africa and east to Hawaiian Islands, north to southern Japan, south to New South Wales. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9-10. Two dark bars on body that end at about middle of the side. Biology: Inhabits sand and rubble bottoms of seaward reefs . Found mostly below depths of 23 m, but occasionally seen in as little as 6 m. Feeds on a wide variety of benthic organisms: gastropods, sponges, algae, bivalves, polychaetes, tunicates, crabs, sea urchins, heart urchins, brittle stars, bryozoans, peanut worms, various small crustaceans and foraminiferans. Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate and sponges. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. A possible fin nipper. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:47 -0600 Clown Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=746&title=clown-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=746&amp;title=clown-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_callisterna.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_callisterna.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_callisterna.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Canthigaster callisterna Max. size: 23.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine ; depth range - 250 m Distribution: Southwest Pacific: Australia, including Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands and New Zealand, including Kermadec Islands. Including New Caledonia Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:46 -0600 Canthigaster papua http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=747&title=canthigaster-papua&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=747&amp;title=canthigaster-papua&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_papua.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_papua.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_papua.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Canthigaster papua Max. size: Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 6 - 50 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Maldives to eastern New Guinea, north to the Philippines and Palau, south to the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia. Morphology: Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-10; Anal soft rays: 8-10 Biology: Occurs singly or in pairs in clear, coral-rich areas of lagoon and seaward reefs Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 - 82°F (25 ­ 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate and sponges. Rarely seen in the trade. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:46 -0600 Bennett's sharpnose puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=748&title=bennett-27s-sharpnose-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=748&amp;title=bennett-27s-sharpnose-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_bennetti.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_bennetti.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_bennetti.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Canthigaster bennetti Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 1 - 12 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa south to Port Alfred, South Africa and east to Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Taiwan, south to New South Wales. Throughout Micronesia. Reported from Tanabe Bay, Japan. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 8-10. Less than 30 small brown dots on side of caudal peduncle. Biology: Inhabits inner reef flats and sheltered lagoons. Feeds mainly on filamentous green algae and to a lesser extent on fleshy and coralline red algae and on benthic invertebrates Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C) and natural diet consists filamentous green algae and benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. May nip tankmate's fins. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:27:46 -0600 Arothron stellatus http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=744&title=arothron-stellatus&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=744&amp;title=arothron-stellatus&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arothron_stellatus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arothron_stellatus.jpg" alt="41Arothron_stellatus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Arothron stellatus Range: Indo-Pacific Ocean: Red Sea and East Africa to the Tuamotus, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Islands, throughout Micronesia, and also the southeast Atlantic: south coast of South Africa Size: Up to 48 in (120 cm) Natural Environment: Inhabit sheltered reefs Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 to 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh. Not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings and plenty of swimming space. Poisonous to eat. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:45 -0600 Compressed Toby http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=745&title=compressed-toby&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=745&amp;title=compressed-toby&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Cacom_u2.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Cacom_u2.jpg" alt="41Cacom_u2.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Max. size: 11.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine ; depth range 5 - 16 m Distribution: Gazetteer Western Pacific: Philippines to the Solomons; northwards to Ryukyu Islands and southern Marianas, southward to Vanuatu. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 8-9. Caudal fin with a series of faint, narrow undulating lines. Biology: Inhabits sandy areas of shallow lagoons and channels. Also found in silty bays or harbors around wharf pilings Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 - 82°F (25 ­ 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate and sponges. Rarely seen in the trade. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:45 -0600 Manila / Striped / Narrow-Lined Pufferfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=741&title=manila2f-striped2f-narrow-lined-pufferfish&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=741&amp;title=manila2f-striped2f-narrow-lined-pufferfish&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arothron_meleagris.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arothron_meleagris.jpg" alt="41Arothron_meleagris.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Arothron manilensis Range: Western Pacific Ocean: Borneo, Philippines, northwestern Australia to Somoa, north to Ryukyu Islands, and Tonga Size: Up to 12 in (30 cm) Natural Environment: Inhabit coastal mud and sand flats and slopes, and seagrass beds Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 to 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet, e.g., brine shrimp, krill, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh. Not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings (three or more) and plenty of swimming space. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:44 -0600 Spyder Eye Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=742&title=spyder-eye-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=742&amp;title=spyder-eye-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Canthigaster_amboinensis.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Canthigaster_amboinensis.jpg" alt="41Canthigaster_amboinensis.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name:Canthigaster amboinensis Range: Indo-Pacific and tropical eastern Pacific Ocean Size: Up to 6 in (15 cm)Natural Environment: Inhabit shallow lagoons and coastal bays, usually in weedy and rocky areas Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 - 82°F (22 - 28°C) and natural diet consists benthic invertebrate and algae. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, finely chopped fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. Requires numerous daily feedings. May nip tankmates fins. Rarely seen in the trade. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:44 -0600 Arothron reticularis http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=743&title=arothron-reticularis&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=743&amp;title=arothron-reticularis&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arret_u2.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arret_u2.jpg" alt="41Arret_u2.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Arothron reticularis Max. size: 40.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; brackish; marine ; depth range 1 - 25 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: north to Ryukyu Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9-10. Body covered with prickles. White lines encircling eye. Biology: Occurs in shallow water reefs near sand or seaweed areas. Also found in estuaries and protected muddy bays; juveniles in mangroves and entering the lower reaches of streams. Feeds on corals, mollusks, and other sand-dwelling invertebrates Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 to 82°F (25 - 28°C) and feeds upon corals and benthic invertebrate. Requires an enriched meaty diet, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh. Not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings and plenty of swimming space. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:44 -0600 Whitespotted Pufferfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=738&title=whitespotted-pufferfish&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=738&amp;title=whitespotted-pufferfish&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arhis_ub.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arhis_ub.jpg" alt="41Arhis_ub.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Arothron hispidus Max. size: 50.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); max. published weight: 2,010 g Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; brackish; marine ; depth range 3 - 50 m Distribution: Gazetteer Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to Panama, north to southern Japan and the Hawaiian Islands, south to Lord Howe and Rapa islands; throughout Micronesia. Eastern Pacific: Baja California ad the Gulf of California to Panama. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 10-11. The body is generally greenish-brown in color, the back, sides and caudal fin profusely speckled with white spots, and the belly marked with white bars. A single bent lateral line. Body with small spines except around snout and caudal peduncle. Each nostril with two fleshy solid tentacles. Restricted gill opening. Biology: Inhabits outer reef slopes to depths of at least 50 m, inner reef flats and lagoons. Juveniles common in weedy areas of estuaries. Usually solitary and territorial on sandy to rubble areas. Feeds on fleshy, calcareous, or coralline algae, detritus, mollusks, tunicates, sponges, corals, zoanthid anemones, crabs, tube worms and echinoderms Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 to 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate, corals and sponges. Requires an enriched mostly meaty diet, e.g., brine shrimp, krill, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become a fin-nipper. Require numerous daily feedings and plenty of swimming space. Will eat smaller fishes. Provide a large cave to rest in when needed mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:43 -0600 Narrow-lined puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=739&title=narrow-lined-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=739&amp;title=narrow-lined-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arothron_manilensis.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arothron_manilensis.jpg" alt="41Arothron_manilensis.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Arothron manilensis Max. size: 31.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; brackish; marine Distribution: Western Pacific: Borneo, Philippines, and northwest Australia to Samoa, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to New South Wales, Australia and Tonga. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 9-10. Body covered with prickles. Many longitudinal dark stripes on body, although the stripes sometimes faint. Biology: Occurs in estuaries, sheltered reef flats, and lagoons to a depth of more than 17 m. Common in seagrass beds and sandy areas; juveniles found among mangroves Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:43 -0600 Map Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=740&title=map-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=740&amp;title=map-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arothron_mappa.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arothron_mappa.jpg" alt="41Arothron_mappa.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Arothron mappa Max. size: 65.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa south to Natal, South Africa and east to Samoa, northward to the Ryukyus and western sea of Japan, southward to New Caledonia and Queensland, Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11-12; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 10-11. Body covered with prickles. Body beautifully colored; black area around anus, black reticulations below pectoral fins. Biology: Occurs in clear lagoon and sheltered seaward reefs. Usually close to shelter. Occurs single. Feeds on algae, sponges, and benthic invertebrates Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 77 to 82°F (25 - 28°C) and feeds upon benthic invertebrate, algae, and sponges. Requires an enriched meaty diet with some vegetable matter, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings and plenty of swimming space. Will chew on anything it can get into its mouth, including aquarium equipment. May need to be dewormed and have their teeth filed to prevent overgrowth, which will inhibit their ability to eat. Poisonous to eat. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:43 -0600 Blackspotted Pufferfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=736&title=blackspotted-pufferfish&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=736&amp;title=blackspotted-pufferfish&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Arothron_nigropunctatus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Arothron_nigropunctatus.jpg" alt="41Arothron_nigropunctatus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Arothron nigropunctatus Max. size: 33.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine ; depth range 3 - 25 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Micronesia and Samoa, north to southern Japan, south to New South Wales. Replaced by Arothron diadematus in the Red Sea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 10-12. Body covered with prickles and with large black spots. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs. Feeds on corals (usually Acropora tips), crustaceans, mollusks, sponges, tunicates and algae. Generally common Aquarium Care:Has a temperature range of 72 to 82°F (22 - 28°C) and feeds upon live corals, usually Acropora. Requires an enriched meaty diet, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, tubifex, worms, chunky fish and shrimp flesh. Not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. Require numerous daily feedings (at least three per day) and plenty of swimming space. May need to be dewormed and have their teeth filed to prevent overgrowth, which will inhibit their ability to eat. More than one and other members of the family can be maintained in the same aquarium. Poisonous to eat. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:42 -0600 Randall's Puffer http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=737&title=randall-27s-puffer&cat=522 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=737&amp;title=randall-27s-puffer&amp;cat=522"><img title="41Torquigener_randalli.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/522/thumbs/41Torquigener_randalli.jpg" alt="41Torquigener_randalli.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Torquigener randalli Max. size: 12.7 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine ; depth range 15 - 104 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: known only from off Oahu, Hawaii Aquarium Care:Pufferfishes are smaller than Porcupinefishes and many species contain a strong toxin, and also have the ability to inflate themselves by ingesting large quantities of air. They do not have pelvic fins, and their front teeth are fused together, yet separated by a gap giving the appearance of having four teeth. In the wild they feed upon snails, tube worms, crabs, sponges, starfish, clams, shrimp, urchins, tunicates, coral polyps, and algae, including coralline algae. In the aquarium, they will take any type of meaty foodstuffs, e.g., brine shrimp, earthworms, and tubifex/black worms, and should also have some fresh greens to graze upon. They may graze upon coralline algae and are not safe with tubeworms and/or, can become fin-nippers. mojoreef Sat, 01 Jan 2005 13:07:42 -0600