Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Fri, 20 Jul 2018 21:55:12 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 Fuzzy Dwarf Lion http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1046&title=fuzzy-dwarf-lion&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1046&amp;title=fuzzy-dwarf-lion&amp;cat=518"><img title="fuzzydwarflion.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/fuzzydwarflion.jpg" alt="fuzzydwarflion.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Sparks<br /><br />3 comments Sparks Wed, 26 Sep 2007 17:14:35 +0000 002 http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1035&title=002&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=1035&amp;title=002&amp;cat=518"><img title="002.JPG" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/002.JPG" alt="002.JPG" /></a><br /><br />by: ecobalance ecobalance Fri, 20 Jul 2007 07:50:27 +0000 th_lionfish_1_ http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=937&title=th-lionfish-1-&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=937&amp;title=th-lionfish-1-&amp;cat=518"><img title="th_lionfish_1_.jpeg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/th_lionfish_1_.jpeg" alt="th_lionfish_1_.jpeg" /></a><br /><br />by: mark peacock mark peacock Mon, 25 Sep 2006 07:04:22 +0000 Volitan Lionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=854&title=volitan-lionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=854&amp;title=volitan-lionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="Volitan-Lionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/Volitan-Lionfish.jpg" alt="Volitan-Lionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: Mon, 24 Oct 2005 20:14:23 +0000 Juvenile Volitans http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=812&title=juvenile-volitans&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=812&amp;title=juvenile-volitans&amp;cat=518"><img title="217Lionfish_resize.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/217Lionfish_resize.jpg" alt="217Lionfish_resize.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: BlennyBabe BlennyBabe Sat, 22 Jan 2005 23:47:42 +0000 Barchin Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=499&title=barchin-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=499&amp;title=barchin-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Sestr_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Sestr_u0.jpg" alt="41Sestr_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Sebastapistes strongia Max. size: 6.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 18 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Society Islands, north to Taiwan, south to Queensland, Australia; Caroline and Mariana islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Lachrymal spines 2. Biology: Common in areas with mixed sand and rubble in reef flats, shallow lagoons and channels. A nocturnal species. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Provide plenty of hiding places, including scattered peices of coral rubble. Often lies up against the rubble in full view. The Barchin Scorpionfish readily eats live grass shrimp, feeder fish, and can be coaxed into eating non-live foods from a feeding stick. Will eat ornamental shrimp and small fishes. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:07:29 +0000 Darkspotted Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=497&title=darkspotted-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=497&amp;title=darkspotted-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Darkspotted_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Darkspotted_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Darkspotted_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Sebastapistes tinkhami Max. size: 8.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Distribution: Indian Ocean: South Africa, Reunion, Christmas Island . Western Pacific: Ogasawara Islands New Caledonia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. With dark spots, especially on rear of body and rear fins. Biology: Rare species. Inhabits deeper reefs. Aquarium Care: Venomous. See other members of the Genus Sebastapistes for general info. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:07:28 +0000 Pygmy Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=498&title=pygmy-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=498&amp;title=pygmy-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Pigmy_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Pigmy_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Pigmy_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes scaber Common Names: Pygmy Scorpionfish, Pygmy Rockcod Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; brackish; marine; depth range 3 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Maldives; Japan to Australia. Biology: Found from estuary reefs to offshore reef habitats, usually in caves. Venomous spines Aquarium Care: Venomous. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:07:28 +0000 Bigmouth Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=494&title=bigmouth-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=494&amp;title=bigmouth-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Scvit_u1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Scvit_u1.jpg" alt="41Scvit_u1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenopsis brevifrons Common Names: Bigmouth Scorpionfish, Shortsnout Scorpionfish Max. size: 13.3 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 38 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Midway and Hawaiian Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5; Vertebrae: 24. Pectoral rays usually 19; a blunt head profile, long jaw (21-27% SL); no hump behind head; longest dorsal spine 4-6; 5 spines on the suborbital ridge and 3 on the lachrymal bone overlying the maxillary. No black band across anal and pelvic fins; reaches 133 mm SL; snout length 3.2-3.9 in head; interorbital width 6.0-8.8 in head. Biology: Usually found on rocky bottom or coral reefs, but also on sand and rubble bottom. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Will eat small fish and ornamental crustaceans. Live shrimp and feeder fish may be necessary to induce a feeding response. They can be taught to take food (i.e. strips of squid or fish) from a feeding stick. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:59 +0000 Jenkins Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=495&title=jenkins-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=495&amp;title=jenkins-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Jenkin_s_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Jenkin_s_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Jenkin_s_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenopsis cacopsis Common Names: Jenkin's Scorpionfish, Titan Scorpionfish Max. size: 51.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; max. published weight: 3,450 g Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 60 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Hawaii. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Vertical scale rows 50-55; lachrymal bone with 2 spines over maxillary, first points down and forward, second points down and back, sometimes second split distally into 2 points; suborbital ridge usually with 5 spines, sometimes some spines split in larger specimens. Biology: This solitary species inhabits the outer edge of the reef. Usually beneath ledges or near entrance to caves. A prized food fish with population greatly reduced in main Hawaiian islands due to fishing pressure, especially by spear fishermen. Stomach contents include small fishes (holocentrid, acanthurid and Aulostomus chinensis. Aquarium Care: Venomous. This species will acclimate to captivity when provided live foods. Feeder fish, fiddler crabs, and grass shrimp are very well accepted, but every attempt should be made to switch the scorptionfish to fresh seafoods like squid, fish and shrimp. The Jenkins Scorpionfish will eat any fish tankmate small enough to fit into its mouth. it is rare in the hobby because of its highly palatable flesh, and a prized target for fisherman. Will spend time out in the open on live rock or at its base in the sand. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:59 +0000 Tassled Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=496&title=tassled-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=496&amp;title=tassled-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Tassled_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Tassled_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Tassled_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenopsis oxycephala Common Names: Tasseled Scorpionfish, Smallscale Scorpionfish Max. size: 36.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 250 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and Sodwana Bay, South Africa to the Mariana Islands, north to Taiwan; Palau and Guam in Micronesia; probably more widespread. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Highly variable in color. Adults 'bearded' with numerous tassels. Juveniles slender with tall dorsal fin Third dorsal spine longest (2.05-2.5) in head; occipital pit absent or very shallow; snout very long (2.7-3.0 in head length); space between opercular spines naked; first dorsal spine short (1.85-2.5) in length of second spine; supraocular and postocular spines broadly joined in adults (only tip of supraocular spine showing) and flaring outward to form a shelf over posterior half of eye. Biology: Inhabits clear-water outer reef slopes and channels from depths of 1 to at least 35 m, in areas with mixed rock and coral substrates. Venomous spines Aquarium Care: Venomous. Do not keep with smaller fish or ornamental crustaceans, as they may become food. This species will stay out in full view. Will sometimes perch on soft corals, which may cause the polyps to close up. The Tassled Scorpionfish often are picked at by fish that feed on coralline algae (because of the number of dermal flaps), such as triggerfish, and pufferfish. Live shrimp and feeder fish may be necessary to induce a feeding response, but can be taught to take food like strips of fish or squid from a feeding stick. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:59 +0000 Blotchfin Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=492&title=blotchfin-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=492&amp;title=blotchfin-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Blotchfin_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Blotchfin_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Blotchfin_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes varipinnis Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 200 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to Micronesia, north to Taiwan, south to Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Pored lateral scale counts from. Biology: Found in various reef habitats in shallow coastal lagoons to moderate depths on outer reefs; in sponges and coralline areas. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Provide plenty of hiding places and live food in order for the Blotchfin Scorpionfish to acclimate to tank life. It will spend quite a bit of time hidden, behind rocks or other decor. Will readily eat live grass shrimp and feeder fish, but shouldn't be housed with more aggressive carnivores (may not get enough to eat). mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:58 +0000 Rainbow Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=493&title=rainbow-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=493&amp;title=rainbow-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Rainbow_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Rainbow_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Rainbow_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes xyris Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 30 m Distribution: Eastern Pacific: California, USA to Peru and the Galapagos Islands. Biology: A common but inconspicuous species. Found in cracks, crevices, under ledge overhangs and other recesses on rocky reefs, steep slopes, and especially on walls. Small individuals often stay near the protective spines of long spined urchin, Diadema mexicanum Aquarium Care: Venomous. See other members of the Genus Scorpaenodes for general information. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:58 +0000 Yellowspotted Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=489&title=yellowspotted-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=489&amp;title=yellowspotted-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Secya_u5.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Secya_u5.jpg" alt="41Secya_u5.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Sebastapistes cyanostigma Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea south to Port Alfred, South Africa and east to the Line Islands, north to Ryukyu Islands, south to Samoa and Australia; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-10; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5-6. Yellow and white spots on body; no dark bars on underside of head. Biology: Found in reef crests with rich coral growth. Typically found among the branches of Pocillopora corals in surge areas of seaward reefs. Also observed between the branches of the fire coral Millepora and Styllophora. Aquarium Care: Venomous. This species does best when kept with a piece of live Pocillopora coral, or a bleached skeleton of a branching coral. It often takes up residence in these. If not available, it will sit on some other hard substrate. The Yellowspotted Scorpionfish is a voracious eater, and will snatch any small fish or shrimp that has moved too close. Will eat grass shrimp (its preference), but will also eat feeder fish. Occasionally, it can be coaxed into taking non-live foods on a feeding stick. Due to the small size of this species, it can be kept with a wider range of tankmates, but be careful if you are keeping other large predators (including scorpionfish). The small size makes it vulnerable to them. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:57 +0000 Cheekspot Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=490&title=cheekspot-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=490&amp;title=cheekspot-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Cheekspot_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Cheekspot_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Cheekspot_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes littoralis Max. size: 11.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 30 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: known from scattered localities. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Sub opercle with a dark spot. Suborbital ridge with single row of 3 spines; interorbital spines usually present, sometimes not well marked; small spines at midline between tympanic spines sometimes present. Biology: Specimens have been collected from deep reefs off Natal, South Africa. Inhabits rocky or coral areas and caves. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Provide plenty of hiding places, overhangs, caves, and coral rubble. Live foods like grass shrimp will help induce a feeding response. This species may be a threat to smaller fish, and will eat ornamental crustaceans. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:57 +0000 Lowfin Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=487&title=lowfin-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=487&amp;title=lowfin-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Lowfin_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Lowfin_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Lowfin_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes parvipinnis Common Names: Lowfin Scorpionfish, Shortfin Scorpionfish, Coral Scorpionfish Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 49 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea to the Marquesan and Tuamoto islands, north to the Ryukyu and Hawaiian islands, south to Lord Howe Island; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-10; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5-6. Interorbital area and snout scaled; small spines at midline between tympanic spines frequently present; interorbital spines present; extra spines usually present on upper rear margin of eye after supraocular spine; dorsal spine, usually non longer than orbit diameter; body often covered with small skin flaps. Distinguished from other species of Scorpaenodes by having suborbital ridge with more than 5 spinous points, usually with 10 or more in adults. Biology: Inhabits areas of rich coral growth from near shore to the outer reef slope. Cryptic. Venomous spine Aquarium Care: Venomous. This species requires plenty of hiding places and live food to help acclimate to tank life. It will spend time hiding behind rocks or other decor. The Lowfin Scorpionfish will readily eat live grass shrimp and small fiddler crabs. Although it is less of a threat to fish tankmates than other members of the family, it may eat small damselfish, blennies, and gobies. Will eat ornamental crustaceans. Rarely comes out in the open before the lights are turned off for the night. A good way to observe is with a red fluorescent or incandescent bulb over the tank at night (or a flashlight with a red filter). mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:56 +0000 Leaf Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=488&title=leaf-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=488&amp;title=leaf-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Leaf_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Leaf_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Leaf_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Taenianotus triacanthus Common Names: Leaf Scorpionfish, Leaf Fish, Paper Fish Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 134 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Galapagos Islands, north to Ryukyu and Hawaiian islands, south to Australia and the Tuamoto Islands; Mariana and Marshall islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5-6. Tan to reddish or brown in color. Has prickly papillae instead of scales. Dorsal fin high, 3rd or 4th spine longest; suborbital ridge without spines or with lump at head of ridge; preopercle with 2 indistinct spines only; body extremely compressed; soft dorsal fin attached to the caudal fin; coloration is variable, from nearly all yellow to red, brown or nearly black and variously mottled with darker pigment. Biology: Inhabits reef flats, outer reef slopes, current-swept channels, and rarely on lagoon reefs. Solitary and usually immobile among algae or seagrass but effects hip movements resembling that of a leaf falling down from a tree. Molts twice a month with the skin breaking off first in the head region. Has the habit of mimicking a dead leaf by swaying from side to side. Feeds on small crustaceans and fishes; also feeds on larvae. Venomous spines. Aquarium Care: Venomous. A great species for captivity, but should not be put in a tank with more aggressive feeders or any fish that might nip at its leaflike body. Will rarely accept anything but live food like small feeder fish or grass shrimp. The Leaf Scorpionfish has a small mouth, for a Scorpionfish, so prey items should be chosen accordingly. Spends time out in the open on exposed perches. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 00:02:56 +0000 Largescaled Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=485&title=largescaled-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=485&amp;title=largescaled-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Largescaled_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Largescaled_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Largescaled_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaena scrofa Max. size: 50.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); max. published weight: 2,960 g Environment: demersal; non-migratory; brackish; marine; depth range 20 - 500 m Distribution: Eastern Atlantic: British Isles (rare) to Senegal including Madeira, the Canary Islands, and Cape Verde. Also throughout the Mediterranean except Black Sea. South African species thought to be the same as population in the northeast Atlantic. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Dark spot often on spinous dorsal. Biology: Solitary and sedentary over rocky, sandy or muddy bottoms. Feeds on fishes, crustaceans and mollusks Aquarium Care: Venomous. See other members of genus for general info. In the wild feeds on fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:46:17 +0000 Reef Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=486&title=reef-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=486&amp;title=reef-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Reef_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Reef_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Reef_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes caribbaeus Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 18 m Distribution: Western Atlantic: Florida, USA and Bahamas to Panama and northern South America. Antilles, western and southern Caribbean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Has conspicuous dark spot on rear dorsal fin spines. Without occipital pit. Palatine teeth absent; no preorbital spines; suborbital ridge with 4 or 5 spinous points. Biology: Inhabits coral reefs. Sometimes drifts above hard substratum or near ceilings of caves or ledges. Secretive but common Aquarium Care: Venomous. This species should be provided with plenty of hiding spots, such as overhangs, caves, and coral rubble. Live foods like grass shrimp will be necessary to induce a feeding response. It may be difficult to feed if kept with aggressive feeders like goupers, snappers, soapfish, or tirggers. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:46:17 +0000 Red Lionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=483&title=red-lionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=483&amp;title=red-lionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Red_lionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Red_lionfish.jpg" alt="41Red_lionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pterois volitans Common Names: Red Lionfish, Volitans Lionfish, Common Lionfish, Turkeyfish, Red Firefish, Butterfly Cod, Devilfish Max. size: 38.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 55 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: western Australia and Malaysia to the Marquesan Islands and Oeno (Pitcairn group); north to southern Japan and southern Korea; south to Lord Howe, Kermadec, and Austral Islands; throughout Micronesia. Also known from Inhaca Islands, Mozambique Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7. Scales cycloid. Variable in color, usually in relation to habitat. Coastal species generally darker, sometimes almost black in estuaries. Often with large tentacles above eyes. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs from turbid inshore areas to depths of 50 m. Hides in unexposed places at daytime often with head down and practically immobile. Pelagic juveniles expatriate over great distances and the reason for their broad geographical range. Hunts small fishes, shrimps, and crabs at night, using its widespread pectorals trapping prey into a corner, stunning it and then swallowing it in one sweep. Dorsal spines are venomous; the sting can be treated by heating the afflicted part and application of corticoids Aquarium Care: Venomous. A great aquarium species that spends most of its time in the open. Provide plenty of space to hover in the water column or sit on the substrate. Due to the large size, it is a bigger threat to tankmates, so choose cautiously. May behave aggressively toward members of the same or similar species. It is one of the best in the subfamily for both shallow water and deep water tanks. Will eat ornamental shrimps, including dancing shrimps, cleaner shrimps, and banded coral shrimps. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:46:16 +0000 Weedy Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=484&title=weedy-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=484&amp;title=weedy-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Weedy_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Weedy_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Weedy_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Rhinopias frondosa Max. size: 23.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 13 - 90 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: East Africa to the Caroline Islands, north to southern Japan. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Highly variable in color and in appendages in relation to habitat. Covered with appendages on algae reefs, but plain when deep with sponges. Body highly compressed and covered with weed-like tassels. Biology: Rare species. Found in rich soft-bottom habitats in current prone channels; also in rocky or coralline habitats near algae where it camouflages itself. Hunts prey at night like other species of scorpaenids, feeding on fish and small invertebrates. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Rare in the hobby and would be an expensive find. Readily adapts to captive life. They are relatively inactive and can be kept in smaller tanks. The Weedy Scorpionfish, as well as others in the Genus, are prone to bacterial infections, so it is important to be able to identify and treat different fish diseases. Should not be housed with small fishes or ornamental shrimps. Live foods may be necessary to initiate feeding, and they an be taught to take pieces of shrimp, squid, and fish from a feeding stick. Try not to house with fish that pick on encrusting inverts, as they may pick at the Weedy Scorpionfish (thinking it is a rock covered in food). Also, care should be taken when housing with other predatory fish, smaller specimens may be eaten by frogfish, other scorpionfish, or large groupers (although the deep body and venomous spines maybe a deterrant). <br /><br />3 comments mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:46:16 +0000 Hawaiian Turkeyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=482&title=hawaiian-turkeyfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=482&amp;title=hawaiian-turkeyfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Hawaiian_turkeyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Hawaiian_turkeyfish.jpg" alt="41Hawaiian_turkeyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pterois sphex Common Names: Hawaiian Turkeyfish, Hawaiian Lionfish Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 122 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: known only from Hawaii. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11-12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-8. Pectoral rays all unbranched, very long and free from membrane distally; dorsal spines very long, some about as long as body depth. Ctenoid scales with about 50-55 vertical scale rows; coronal spines present; most head spines become multiple with growth. Lachrymal and suborbital bones densely covered with spines for specimen 10 cm SL. Supraocular tentacles banded with black, frequently tentacles absent in large specimens. Small specimens with fewer bars on pectoral and pelvic fins. Biology: Inhabits lagoon and seaward reefs. Generally hidden beneath ledges or caves during the day; a nocturnal feeder on crustaceans Aquarium Care: Venomous. This is a good aquarium fish whose husbandry needs are similar to those of Pterois antennata. it can be aggressive toward members of its species or members of the genus, especially in a smaller tank. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:46:15 +0000 Zebra Turkeyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=481&title=zebra-turkeyfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=481&amp;title=zebra-turkeyfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Zebra_turkeyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Zebra_turkeyfish.jpg" alt="41Zebra_turkeyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Dendrochirus zebra Common Names: Zebra Lionfish, Dwarf Lionfish Max. size: 25.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa, north to southern Japan and the Ogasawara Islands, south to Australia and Lord Howe Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7. Body reddish with 5 dark bars, alternating with thin dark bars in large specimens; median fins with small dark spots; dark spot on cheek . Mid-dorsal spines longer than body depth. Biology: Found on coral, rubble, or rock bottoms of reef flats; also in coastal to outer reef habitats in sheltered lagoons and in caves, sometimes in small aggregations. Usually shallow but reported to 80 m depth. Pelagic stages travel great distances and expatriate to sub-tropical zones. Spawned in captivity. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Similar in care to the Shortfin Lionfish (D. brachypterus). Provide plenty of good hiding spots, and feed a varied diet. May act aggressively toward members of the same or similar species (Dendochirus spp.). Can be housed in a shallow water or deep water tank. Will likely spend more time in the open if provided the dim lighting of a deep water tank. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:42 +0000 Small Red Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=478&title=small-red-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=478&amp;title=small-red-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Small_red_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Small_red_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Small_red_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaena notata Max. size: 24.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine; depth range 10 - 700 m Distribution: Eastern Atlantic: Bay of Biscay to Senegal, Madeira, Azores and the Canary Islands, including the Mediterranean (rare in northern Adriatic) and the Black Sea (as Scorpaena notata afimbria). Biology: Common in rocky littoral habitats. Feeds on crustaceans and small fishes. Aquarium Care: Venomous. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:41 +0000 Shortfin Turkeyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=479&title=shortfin-turkeyfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=479&amp;title=shortfin-turkeyfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Shortfin_turkeyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Shortfin_turkeyfish.jpg" alt="41Shortfin_turkeyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Dendrochirus brachypterus Common Names: Shortfin Turkeyfish, Shortfin Lionfish, Dwarf Lionfish, Fuzzy Dwarf Lionfish Max. size: 17.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 68 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to Samoa and Tonga, north to southern Japan, south to Lord Howe Island; Mariana Islands in Micronesia; the Arafura Sea and Australia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-10; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5-6. Body reddish with vague broad bars; paired fins with bars; median fins with small dark spots. Mid-dorsal spines shorter than body depth. Biology: Common in reef flats and shallow lagoons, in areas with weed-covered rocks on sandy substrates. Adults often found on sponges and juveniles are sometimes found in small aggregations on remote bommies with 10 or so individuals. Nocturnal. Feeds on small crustaceans Aquarium Care: Venomous. Provide the Shortfin Lionfish plenty of hiding places. If in a very large aquarium, with numerous hiding places, it is possible to keep a group (one larger individual and one or more smaller specimens). Any antagonism between spcimens, they will have to be separated. Often this species is reluctant to eat anything but live food. If more boisterous eaters are present, the Shortfin Lionfish may be difficult to feed. More likely to be out in the open than the Zebra Lionfish. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:41 +0000 Twospot Turkeyfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=480&title=twospot-turkeyfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=480&amp;title=twospot-turkeyfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Twospot_turkeyfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Twospot_turkeyfish.jpg" alt="41Twospot_turkeyfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Dendrochirus biocellatus Common Names: Twinspot Lionfish, Twospot Turkeyfish, Ocellated Lionfish, Fu Manchu Lionfish Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 40 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Mauritius, Reunion, Maldives and Sri Lanka to the Society Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Scott Reef; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Eye-like spots in the soft dorsal fin and feeler-like tentacles in front of the mouth. Mid-dorsal spines shorter than body depth. The only species of Dendrochirus with a pair of distinct ocelli on the soft-rayed dorsal fin. Biology: An uncommon inhabitant of clear waters rich in corals to depths of 40 m or more. Secretive and usually observed at night. During the day in caves and sponges, and usually well out of sight. Venomous spines. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Noted to be a problematic member of the family to maintain. The occasional specimen will refuse to eat. Best to keep with less-aggressive tankmates, and provide it caves, crevices, and overhangs in order to acclimate. Will eat ornamental shrimps and smaller fishes. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:41 +0000 Devil Lionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=476&title=devil-lionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=476&amp;title=devil-lionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Devil_firefish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Devil_firefish.jpg" alt="41Devil_firefish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pterois miles Max. size: 35.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 60 m Distribution: Indian Ocean: Red Sea south to Port Alfred, South Africa and east to Sumatra, Indonesia. Also known in eastern Mediterranean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Reddish to tan or grey in color, with numerous thin dark bars on body and head; tentacle above eye may be faintly banded. Adults have a band of small spines along the cheek and small spots in the median fins. Biology: Lives in coastal waters in muddy habitats. Fin spines highly venomous, may cause human death. Aquarium Care: Venomous. See other members of the Genus Pterois for general info. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:40 +0000 Hawaiian Lionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=477&title=hawaiian-lionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=477&amp;title=hawaiian-lionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Debar_u0.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Debar_u0.jpg" alt="41Debar_u0.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Dendrochirus barberi Common Names: Hawaiian Lionfish, Green Lionfish Max. size: 16.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 1 - 50 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Hawaiian Islands. Recently been reported from Johnston Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Large pectoral fin, upper rays branched distally; dorsal fin spines longer than 1/2 body depth, membranes deeply incised. Scales ctenoid with about 50-55 vertical scale rows. Coronal spines present; some branching of head spines in large specimens. Suborbital ridge a single row of spines, not as broad patch of tiny spinules. Supraocular tentacle when present short, less than orbit diameter and usually absent; without black band. Biology: Found under ledges in turbid lagoons and clear seaward reefs Aquarium Care: Venomous. Rarely found in the hobby. Hardy species that needs plenty of hiding spots. Initially, it may only eat live foods, but it can be taught to take pieces of fish flesh, table shrimp, and squid off of a feeding stick. Larger specimens may act aggressively toward members of their own species or others in the genus. Problems with aggression are more likely to happen in small tanks. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:40 +0000 Mozambique Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=474&title=mozambique-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=474&amp;title=mozambique-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Pamos_u6.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Pamos_u6.jpg" alt="41Pamos_u6.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Parascorpaena mossambica Max. size: 10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 18 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to the Society Islands, north to Izu Islands, south to Australia; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Supraocular tentacles well developed. Biology: Inhabits areas with mixed sand and rubble in reef flats, shallow lagoons, and channels. Hides during the day, ventures out in the open at night. Aquarium Care: Venomous. Readily adapts to tank life. Does best if housed in a tank with coral rubble or pieces of live rock on the bottom. Will sit up against rocks and rubble and can be observed in full view. Will eat feeder fish and grass shrimp. It may be taught to take fresh bits of seafood from a feeding stick. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:39 +0000 Decoy Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=475&title=decoy-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=475&amp;title=decoy-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Decoy_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Decoy_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Decoy_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Iracundus signifer Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 10 - 70 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: South Africa, Mauritius, Reunion. Pacific Ocean: Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, and from the Society, Cook, Marquesan, Tuamoto, Pitcairn and Hawaiian islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 5. Anterior part of dorsal fin resembles a small fish, the fin also has a spot between spines 1-2 or 1-3. Lachrymal bone with 2 spines over maxillary, first points forward, second broad, pointing out and to rear; suborbital ridge without spines except one at rear before opercle; preopercular spines short, usually only 3 developed; no supplemental preopercular spine at base of first spine; a dark spot on the spinous dorsal fin between spines 1 or 2 and 3; and vertical scale rows of about 65-75. Biology: Found on sand and rubble under ledges of seaward reefs. The dorsal fin mimics a tiny fish and is used as a lure. Aquarium Care: Venomous. This species is a hardy one, whose behavior and bright coloration make it a desirable addition to either a fish-only or reef tank. It will sit out in the open. The Decoy Scorpionfish is a threat to ornamental crustaceans or small fishes. Can eat prey up to one half of its total length and may consume six smaller fishes in one feeding episode. May fight with members of its own species in a tank. Aquarium observations suggest it prefers soft substrates. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:39 +0000 Broadbarred Lionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=472&title=broadbarred-lionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=472&amp;title=broadbarred-lionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Broadbarred_firefish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Broadbarred_firefish.jpg" alt="41Broadbarred_firefish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pterois antennata Common Names: Broadbarred Lionfish, Broadbarred Firefish, Spotfin Lionfish, Antennata Lionfish, Ragged-finned Firefish Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 2 - 50 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Marquesan and Mangaréva islands, north to southern Japan, south to Queensland, Australia and Kermadec and Austral islands; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11-12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6. Reddish to tan with many dark bars on body; median fins with scattered dark spots; tentacle above eye long and with dark bands. Adults with bluish black blotches near the base of the pectoral fins Biology: Occurs in lagoon and seaward reefs. Hides in crevices under rocks and coral formations during the day and hunts at night. Typically with head towards the safety of their hide-out or narrow passage. Feeds on shrimps and crabs. Venomous and capable of inflicting a painful sting. Minimum depth reported taken from. Solitary or in groups, under ledges and holes. Aquarium Care: Venomous. This is a durable fish that will adapt to captivity if provided plenty of hiding places. More than one specimen should be various shelter sites so each can have its own refuge. Will eat grass shrimp, feeder fish, and can be taught to eat non-live foods. The Broadbarred Lionfish will eat ornamental shrimps and smaller fishes that can fit into its mouth. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:38 +0000 Guam Scorpionfish http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=473&title=guam-scorpionfish&cat=518 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=473&amp;title=guam-scorpionfish&amp;cat=518"><img title="41Guam_scorpionfish.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/518/thumbs/41Guam_scorpionfish.jpg" alt="41Guam_scorpionfish.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Scorpaenodes guamensis Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 5 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to the Pitcairn group, north to Izu Islands, south to New South Wales, Australia. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 13-14; Dorsal soft rays (total): 7-9; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 4-5 Biology: Found in rock crevices in reef flats, shallow lagoons, and channels. Feeds mainly at night on small shrimps, crabs, and polychaetes. Venomous spines. Aquarium Care: Venomous. The reclusive Guam Scorpionfish requires plenty of hiding spots and live food in order to acclimate to tank life. It will spend much of its time out of sight, behind rocks or other decor. Will accept live grass shrimp and feeder fish. Should not be kept with more aggressive carnivores until it is fully acclimated because it might have difficulty getting enough food. mojoreef Wed, 29 Dec 2004 23:36:38 +0000