Reef Frontiers en-us http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish Tue, 18 Dec 2018 10:29:25 +0000 PhotoPost Pro 7.0 60 Twospot Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=795&title=twospot-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=795&amp;title=twospot-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Twospot_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias bimaculatus Common Names: Twospot Anthias, Twinspot Anthias Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: East Africa, Maldives and Indonesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Displays different or stronger color patterns when living together with similar looking species to enhance recognition by females which may lead to further speciation. Biology: Inhabits deep coastal drop-offs. In Java Sea, taken only in dead reef areas in somewhat turbid water. Closely related species such as P. pleurotaenia and P. bimaculatus may spawn at the same time and produce accidental hybrids. Aquarium Care: In order to thrive in captivity, the Twospot Anthias requires plenty of swimming room, good hiding spots, and good water quality. Not suited to the shallow water tank, but does best in a deep water tank with dim lighting. This species should be housed with non-aggressive tankmates. If the Twospot Anthias gets picked on by other species in the community, it will fail to acclimate. This species is difficult to feed, and my require live brine shrimp to get a feeding response. Upon acclimation, this fish will hide for several days to a week. Once comfortable in its surroundings, it may show aggression towards other anthias and other zooplankton feeders. Unless a very large tank, this species should be kept one per tank. To house a group of Twospot Anthias, keep 1 male with 5+ females. Due to collection in deep water, choose tankmates carefully by observing their swimming behavior in the water column. Does best in deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Tue, 11 Jan 2005 00:10:05 +0000 Townsend's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=794&title=townsend-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=794&amp;title=townsend-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" alt="41Townsend_s_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias townsendi Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: demersal; marine; depth range 15 - 63 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Persian Gulf to southern Oman and southern Iran. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8 Biology: Found on rocky bottom. Aquarium Care: Keep only one male per tank. Provide plenty of water movement, hiding places, and non-aggressive tankmates to make acclimation easier. Very similar to P. taeniatus, except P. townsendi males have a crimson red semicircular band on the outer edge of the tail, which is bordered by luminescent blue bands. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Tue, 11 Jan 2005 00:00:58 +0000 Stocky Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=793&title=stocky-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=793&amp;title=stocky-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Stocky_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias hypselosoma Common Names: Stocky Anthias, Pink Anthias, Truncate Anthias Max. size: 19.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 6 - 50 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Maldives to Samoa, north to Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Plain pink but males display with intense color. Males have a red spot on the spinous portion of the dorsal fin. Juveniles and females lace this dorsal spot, but their caudal fin has red upper and lower tips and a narrow red edge. Males have a truncated caudal fin (posterior edge is rounded), although males may have thin streamers present on the upper tip. Females have a slightly emarginate caudal fin. Biology: Usually occurs in groups on well-protected reefs of lagoons or bays. Aquarium Care: This is a hardy species that needs plenty of hiding places, good water movement, and non-aggressive tankmates, inorder to make acclimation easier. Keep one male per tank. Can be kept in small groups in very large tanks (1 male only). The Stocky Anthias can be kept in both shallow water or deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:58:11 +0000 Red-cheeked Fairy Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=792&title=red-cheeked-fairy-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=792&amp;title=red-cheeked-fairy-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Redcheeked_Fairy_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias huchtii Common Names: Red-cheeked Fairy Anthias, Redcheek Anthias, Green Anthias, Threadfin Anthias, Red-cheeked Fairy Basslet Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); 6.0 cm TL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 3 - 30 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Moluccas and the Philippines to Vanuatu, south to the Great Barrier Reef; Palau in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Occurs singly or in small groups around coral outcrops of clear outer reef slopes. Males are territorial and haremic. Aquarium Care: This species is hardy and aggressive. Unless in a very large tank, it is best to keep solitary individuals. In this larger system, a group can consist of 1 male with 8+ females. Care must be taken when selecting females, to ensure they are not undergoing sex changes (if keeping with a male). The Red-cheeked Anthias should not be housed with other anthias species or peaceful zooplankton feeders, such as flasher wrasses, fairy wrasses, and dart gobies. Does well in both deep water and shallow water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:53:37 +0000 Redbar Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=791&title=redbar-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=791&amp;title=redbar-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" alt="41Redbar_Anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias cooperi Common Names: Redbar Anthias, Cooper's Anthias, Silverstreak Anthias Max. size: 14.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 91 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: East Africa to Samoa and the Line Islands, north to southern Japan, south to the Great Barrier Reef; Palau, Marshall and Mariana islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Males develop an incomplete crimson bar in the middle of their sides. Biology: Mostly found on open substrate with low reef and remote bommies in depths over 20 m. Juveniles maybe shallow in coastal reefs. Form small, loose aggregations along current-swept drop-offs. Aquarium Care: In order to help acclimate this species, provide plenty of hiding spots, good water movement, and non-aggressive tankmates. A less demanding species, that does better with reduced lighting and some sort of branching gorgonian (whether live or artificial). In a larger tank, the Redbar Anthias can be kept in small groups. Only one male per tank. This species does better with lower light than a normal shallow water tank, however, it might be acclimated to brighter light if provided shelter sites. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:49:48 +0000 Pseudanthias hiva http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=790&title=pseudanthias-hiva&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=790&amp;title=pseudanthias-hiva&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_hiva.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias hiva Max. size: 10.0 cm SL (male/unsexed); 6.0 cm SL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 34 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Marquesan Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7; Vertebrae: 26. Body depth 3-3.2 in SL; head length 3=3.2 in SL. No papillae on posterior edge of orbit. Front of upper lip of males without a prominent fleshy protuberance. Tenth dorsal spine longest, 2.05-2.3 in HL. Color of females orange shading to pink ventrally, the scales dorsally on body with dusky yellow centers, those ventrally with yellow; a narrow orange red bar on body below 8th dorsal spine ; a yellow-orange band, bordered below by violet, from lower part of eye to pectoral-fin base; dorsal fin orange with a violet margin; front half of anal fin magenta with a violet margin, the posterior half yellow, the lobe tips bright red. Color of body of males lavender-red dorsally, shading to pale lavender ventrally, the scales below lateral line with yellow centers; head orange-red above a bluish white line from lower edge of orbit to lower base of pectoral fin, pale orange below; dorsal fin translucent orange-yellow with a lavender margin; anal fin translucent lavender with a row of small yellow spots on membranes; caudal fin red, the upper and lower edges and filaments pink; pelvic fins light red. Scales above lateral line to 2nd dorsal spine 6, middle dorsal spines 3.5. Biology: Specimens collected over rocky substrata, usually at depths greater than 25 m; with the use of rotenone and quinaldine. Aquarium Care: Feeds on zooplankton. Not usually seen in the hobby. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:49:47 +0000 Pseudanthias carlsoni http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=788&title=pseudanthias-carlsoni&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=788&amp;title=pseudanthias-carlsoni&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_carlsoni1.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias carlsoni Max. size: 7.4 cm SL (male/unsexed); 6.21 cm SL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 37 - 73 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Loyalty Islands. Except those from Fiji, specimens collected are not listed as paratypes because of the difference in gill-raker counts. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7; Vertebrae: 26. Body moderately deep, 2.7-3.1 in SL. Head length 3.05-3.2 in SL. Posterior edge of orbit without papillae. Caudal fin deeply emarginate to lunate, the caudal concavity 1.5-2.15 in head. Males without a fleshy protuberance at front of upper lip; third dorsal spine moderately elongate, 1.6-1.85 in HL. Females in life orange-pink with a vertically elongate dusky spot on each scale dorsally on body, the spots becoming yellow ventrally. Males pink, shading to orange anteriorly and pale lavender ventrally, with a red bar on side below 8th and 9th dorsal spines, the same yellow band on the head as females but brighter and a conspicuous red spot in dorsal fin between 6th and 7th or 8th spines. Biology: Occurs on moderately deep reefs Aquarium Care: Originating from the moderately deep reef, this species will do best in a dimly lit aquarium. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:37:06 +0000 Dispar Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=787&title=dispar-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=787&amp;title=dispar-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41dispar_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41dispar_anthias.jpg" alt="41dispar_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias dispar Common Names: Dispar Anthias, Redfin Anthias, Peach Anthias Max. size: 9.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 18 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Christmas Island to the Line Islands, north to the Yaeyama Islands, south to the Great Barrier Reef, Fiji and Samoa; Palau, eastern Caroline Islands, and southern Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Replaced by Pseudanthias ignitus in the Indian Ocean. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Male displays a bright red dorsal fin. Ventral fins greatly extended. Female orange with yellowish tail and a pink line from the tip of the snout angling down, passing through the lower part of the eye. Biology: Found at the upper-edge of steep outer reef slopes, with moderate currents. Occurs in large aggregations, of mixed sexes when feeding in currents sweeping the reef. Aquarium Care: This species is demanding and difficult to feed. It is also more likely to be picked on by more aggressive species in the aquarium. They are best kept in groups (1 male with 6+ females), in a large tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female/dominant of the group will often morph to take its place. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:27:15 +0000 One-stripe Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=786&title=one-stripe-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=786&amp;title=one-stripe-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41onestripe_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41onestripe_anthias.jpg" alt="41onestripe_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias fasciatus Common Names: One-stripe Anthias, Redstripe Anthias, Striped Anthias Max. size: 21.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 20 - 150 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: southern Japan to the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Juveniles of this species lack the red lateral stripe. Biology: Found in or near caves and ledges of seaward reefs. Adults swim upside-down. Aquarium Care: Temperature 20-26ºC. This species should be provided a large cave or overhang in dim lighting. Suitable tankmates include cardinalfish, assessors, chromis, gobies, dart gobies, comets, and flasher wrasses. This species can be kept in small groups, but only one male per tank. Will not harm inverts. The One-stripe Anthias is prone to get decompression problems from collection in deeper water. Examine specimens for signs of problems (they should maintain their position in the water column). Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 23:19:06 +0000 Bicolor Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=785&title=bicolor-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=785&amp;title=bicolor-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41bicolor_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41bicolor_anthias.jpg" alt="41bicolor_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias bicolor Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 68 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Mauritius to the Hawaiian and Line islands, north to the Ryukyu Islands, south to the Loyalty Islands; Marshall and Caroline islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Male has elongated swcond and theird dorsal spines, with yellow-tips that are used for display. Felames only have the third dorsal spine prolonged. Biology: Relatively uncommon inhabitant of lagoon patch reefs and outer reef slopes. Found in deep coastal to outer reef slopes, in current prone areas. It occurs in small groups above coral outcrops or near crevices or ledges. Aquarium Care: An easier to keep species, in which young anthias acclimate better than large adults. The Bicolor Anthias will not harm inverts, and will acclimate easier with less intense lighting (can be acclimated to higher lighting). If the Bicolor Anthias is introduced first, adults can be kept with fish that are moderately aggressive, such as surgeonfish, small to medium dottybacks, and pygmy angelfish. A group (1 male with 8+ females) can be kept in a very large tank. This species is prone to lose its coloration unless fed a diet with enriched foods that are high in carotenoids. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Mon, 10 Jan 2005 22:58:57 +0000 Yellowback Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=542&title=yellowback-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=542&amp;title=yellowback-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Yellowback_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Yellowback_anthias.jpg" alt="41Yellowback_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias evansi Common Names: Yellowback Anthias, Yellowtail Anthias, Evan's Anthias Max. size: 12.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 40 m Distribution: Indian Ocean: East Africa to the Cocos-Keeling and Christmas islands, north to the Andaman Sea. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10-11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Readily identified by the blue and yellow coloration. Biology: Occurs in large groups on outer reef slopes. Schooling species along upper parts of drop-offs and in outer reef lagoons. Feeds at various depths to near surface in pursuit of zooplankton. Aquarium Care: This is a difficult species and should be left for an advanced aquarist. In order to increase the chance of success with the Yellowback Anthias, a productive refugium will provide the constant supply of zooplankton. This species should be housed with peaceful tankmates. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:12:37 +0000 Yellowlined Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=543&title=yellowlined-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=543&amp;title=yellowlined-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Yellowlined_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Yellowlined_anthias.jpg" alt="41Yellowlined_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias luzonensis Common Names: Luzon Anthias, Yellowlined Anthias, Yellowline Anthias Max. size: 14.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 60 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Taiwan, Philippines, Indonesia, and the northern Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Occurs in coastal reefs, along deep slopes, usually in small aggregations. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places, good water movement, and non-aggressive tankmates. This species can be kept in groups in a larger tank. Only one male per tank. The Yellowlined Anthias does best in a dimly lit deep water tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:12:37 +0000 Threadfin Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=539&title=threadfin-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=539&amp;title=threadfin-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Threadfin_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Threadfin_anthias.jpg" alt="41Threadfin_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Nemanthias carberryi Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 30 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: widespread in the area, east to the Maldives and south to South Africa. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Juveniles with 12 dorsal spines, the first of which is small and disappears with growth. The first nd second dorsal spines are prolonged in this species, and the upper lip of adults is thick and pointed. Biology: Found in groups off outer reef slopes. Feed on zooplankton. Protogynous hermaphrodite. Aquarium Care: Provide strong water movement, good water quality, plenty of hiding places and non-aggressive tankmates. Does best in a group with 1 male and 8+ females. May need live foods like brine shrimp to induce feeding behavior, or introducing into an aquarium with an established group of less aggressive anthias may help its acclimation. Can be kept in either a deep water or shallow water tank. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:12:36 +0000 Sunset Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=538&title=sunset-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=538&amp;title=sunset-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Sunset_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Sunset_anthias.jpg" alt="41Sunset_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias parvirostris (subgenus Mirolabrichthys) Common Names: Sunset Anthias, Diadem Anthias, Shortsnout Anthias Max. size: 7.5 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 35 - 60 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Mauritius, Maldives, Philippines, and the Solomon Islands. Also in Izu Islands and Palau. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Rarely seen because of small size and deepwater habitat. Usually in depths over 40 m and more common in 50-60 m range where it forms small groups that swim close to the substrate; may also occur in aggregations above patch reefs on sand or rubble seaward slopes. Aquarium Care: Rarely seen in the hobby. This species is moderately hardy, and should be provided plenty of hiding places, dim lighting, and non-aggressive tankmates. One male per tank, but can keep in a group of one male with several+ females. Once the Sunset Anthias is adjusted to tank life, it will eat a variety. Live foods may be required to induce some specimens to eat. Can be kept in a shallow water tank, however, it does best in deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:47 +0000 Splittail Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=535&title=splittail-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=535&amp;title=splittail-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Splittail.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Splittail.jpg" alt="41Splittail.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Hemanthias peruanus Common Names: Splittail Anthias, Splittail Bass Max. size: 45.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: pelagic; marine; depth range 20 - 120 m Distribution: Eastern Pacific: Baja California, Mexico to northern Chile. Morphology: Third dorsal spine longest, with well-produced filament; middle rays of upper and lower lobes of caudal fin longest. Biology: Forms schools Feeds on zooplankton Aquarium Care: Deep water aquarium. Not much information available on this species. Feeds on zooplankton. Would most likely be quite expensive to aquire due to the depth of collection. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:46 +0000 Squarespot Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=536&title=squarespotanthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=536&amp;title=squarespotanthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Square-spot_fairy_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Square-spot_fairy_basslet.jpg" alt="41Square-spot_fairy_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias pleurotaenia Common Names: Squarespot Anthias, Squareblock Anthias, Squareback Anthias, Mirror Anthias Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 180 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Indonesia to Samoa, north to Ryukyu Islands, south to Rowley Shoals and New Caledonia. Throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7. Highly variable in color and also in the size of the pale blotch (looks blue in natural light). Latter varied from being totally absent to an area almost half the body size, especially when showing nuptial colors. At the Rowley Shoals, off the north-western Australian coast, it only shows the blotch when nuptial. Biology: Aggregations of this species occur a few meters above the edges of current-swept drop-offs. Females and males in separate aggregations or mixed sexes. Juveniles solitary and remain close to shelter. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of places to hide when feeling threatened, and swimming space. This species does best in lower lighting, as the Squarespot Anthias tend to fade in coloration under brighter lights. Acclimation is slow-going, usually taking a week or more before the fish ventures out. As it becomes accustomed to the environment, it will be less shy and more willing to accept live and prepared foods. Smaller females and juveniles tend to adjust easier to aquarium life. Unless a large system of 180+ gallons, keep only one specimen. One male per tank with 6+ females is recommended for a group, in order to avoid terminal battles. The Squarespot Anthias will act aggressively towards other zooplankton feeders. Will not hurt inverts. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:46 +0000 Resplendent Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=533&title=resplendent-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=533&amp;title=resplendent-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Resplendent_goldie.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Resplendent_goldie.jpg" alt="41Resplendent_goldie.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias pulcherrimus Max. size: 7.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 33 - 35 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Maldives, Chagos Archipelago, Seychelles, and Mauritius. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Very similar to P.randalli, except P. pulcherimmus males are pink with a yellow band along the back and along the lower part of the side. Females are orange, shading to pink, with a yellow snout, dorsal fin, and caudal fin. Biology: Inhabits deep reefs. Aquarium Care: This species is uncommon in the hobby. Resplendent Anthias is a delicate species that does best when housed wtih small cardinalfish, flasher wrasses, assessors, fire gobies, dart gobies, shrimp gobies, and small fairy wrasses. When housed with more aggressive species, this species will hide and likely not eat (it is already a more difficult fish to get to feed). Live brine and baby guppies can be used to get some specimens to eat, as well as introducing larger specimens to a tank that contains acclimated P. dispar, or juvenile P. bartlettorum. This species should not be added to a system that contains adult P. bartlettorum, due to their aggressiveness. A small group of one male with several females should only be attempted in large tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:45 +0000 Lyretail Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=534&title=lyretail-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=534&amp;title=lyretail-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Sea_goldie.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Sea_goldie.jpg" alt="41Sea_goldie.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias squamipinnis Common Names: Lyretail Anthias, Sea Goldie, Scalefin Anthias, Jewel Anthias Max. size: 15.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); 7.0 cm TL (female) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 0 - 55 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and Natal, South Africa to the Solomon Islands, north to Japan, south to Australia. Recorded from Europa Island. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6-7. Females are orange gold overall, with a red line edged in purple running from the eye to the pectoral fin base and lack a violet markings on the pectoral fins. Male coloration varies somewhat, but most are dark red or violet with a large pink smudge on each pectoral fin. Color patterns vary from one locality to another. Biology: Found above coral outcrops or patch reefs of clear lagoons, channels, or outer reef slopes. Form large aggregations. Feed on large zooplankton. Males are territorial and haremic. Color patterns and size of sexual transition very slightly from one locality to the next. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of swimming room and hiding places. The Lyretail Anthias is a hardy and aggressive species. Unless in a larger system, it is best to keep solitary individuals. A very large system of can house a group, consisting of 1 male with 8+ females. Use caution when selecting female specimens, to avoid a female undergoing sex change. Due to their aggression, it is best to not keep the Lyretail Anthias with other members of the genus or peaceful zooplankton feeders, such as fairy wrasses, flasher wrasses, and dart gobies. Feed the Lyretail Anthias a varied diet to help retain coloration and keep good health. Won't harm inverts. Does well in both shallow water and deep water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:45 +0000 Yellowstriped Fairy Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=530&title=yellowstriped-fairy-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=530&amp;title=yellowstriped-fairy-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Yellowstriped_fairy_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Yellowstriped_fairy_basslet.jpg" alt="41Yellowstriped_fairy_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias tuka Common Names: Yellowstriped Fairy Basslet, Yellowstriped Fairy Anthias, Yellowstripe Anthias, Purple Anthias Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 2 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Mauritius to the Philippines and Bali (Indonesia) to the Solomon Islands, south to Rowley Shoals and the Great Barrier Reef; Palau in Micronesia. Reported from southern Japan. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Males of this species differ from males of P. pascalus by having a yellowish snout. Biology: Found primarily on continental reefs. Form aggregations on outer reef slopes to depths over 30 m. Feeds on planktonic crustaceans and fish eggs. Aquarium Care: This species doesn't do well in captivity, as it often refuses foods or becomes infected with parasites. It is best to keep this fish in groups of one male and five or more females in a medium to large aquarium with plenty of swimming room in the upper levels of the tank. Provide Yellowstriped Fairy Anthias plenty of hiding spots and shelter areas, and house with non-aggressive species. Keeping a refugium is ideal with this species, as it serves as a constant supply of live foods. Feed mysid shrimp, vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, and frozen preparations. The Yellowstriped Fairy Anthias may lose its intense coloration if not fed enriched foods. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:44 +0000 Red-belted Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=531&title=red-belted-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=531&amp;title=red-belted-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Red-belted_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Red-belted_anthias.jpg" alt="41Red-belted_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias rubrizonatus Common Names: Red-belted Anthias, Red-girdled Anthias, Redband Anthias, Tricolor Anthias Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 20 - 133 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Philippines, New Guinea, Indonesia, Solomon Islands, Fiji, and the Great Barrier Reef. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Juveniles recognized by lavender tipped dorsal spines. Similar to P. connelli in South Africa. Biology: Found in aggregations around isolated coral heads and rubble patches. Juveniles enter harbors and often on silty rocky reefs. Aquarium Care: This species is hardy and aggressive. Unless a very large tank it is best to keep solitary individuals. A group should contain 1 male with 8+ females. The Red-belted Anthias does not do well with other Anthias species or peaceful zooplanktivores. Feed a varied diet in order to keep the Red-belted Anthias from losing its coloration. Can be kept in either a deep water tank or shallow water tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:00:44 +0000 Randall's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=529&title=randall-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=529&amp;title=randall-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Randall_s_fairy_basslet.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Randall_s_fairy_basslet.jpg" alt="41Randall_s_fairy_basslet.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias randalli Common Names: Randall's Anthias, Randall's Fairy Basslet Max. size: 7.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 70 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Philippines and Moluccas to the Marshall Islands, Palau and Kwajalein in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Males develop a slightly protruding upper lip and become striped in red and magenta. Females with yellow snout. Biology: Occurs in caves or coral rubble areas along steep drop-offs or channel walls. Found in small groups. Aquarium Care: This species is uncommon in the hobby. It should be kept in a dimly lit, deep water tank, as it is less likely to acclimate under stronger lighting. Randall's Anthias is a delicate species that does best when housed wtih small cardinalfish, flasher wrasses, assessors, fire gobies, dart gobies, shrimp gobies, and small fairy wrasses. When housed with more aggressive species, the Randall's Anthias will hide and likely not eat (it is already a more difficult fish to get to feed). Live brine and baby guppies can be used to get some specimens to eat, as well as introducing larger specimens to a tank that contains acclimated P. dispar, or juvenile P. bartlettorum. This species should not be added to a system that contains adult P. bartlettorum, due to their aggressiveness. A small group of one male with several females should only be attempted in large tanks. Choose Randall's Anthias carefully. Study their swimming behavior and be wary of specimens having difficutly maintaining their position in the water column (which would indicate a gas bladder problem). Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:52:46 +0000 Red Barbier Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=526&title=red-barbier-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=526&amp;title=red-barbier-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Red_barbier.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Red_barbier.jpg" alt="41Red_barbier.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Hemanthias vivanus Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: benthopelagic; marine; depth range 45 - 610 m Distribution: Western Atlantic: North Carolina and northern Gulf of Mexico to northern Brazil. Biology: Occurs in large, fast moving shoals. Both juveniles and females feed on zooplankton (especially copepods) near the seafloor. Males move away from the seafloor, but capture similar prey. Aquarium Care: This species should be kept in a deep water tank, with temperatures in the range 12.5-23ºC (55-74ºF). Can be kept in small to large groups, and they will form hierarchies based on size-related dominance (larger individuals chasing smaller). The Red Barbier is now available in the hobby (most going to Japan) because of the use of mixed gas to aid in deep-water fish collection. This practice usually means the fish will be more expensive to purchase. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:52:45 +0000 Shen's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=527&title=shen-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=527&amp;title=shen-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_sheni.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_sheni.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_sheni.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias sheni Max. size: 10.5 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 25 - 46 m Distribution: Eastern Indian Ocean: endemic to Rowley Shoals and Scott Reef, Western Australia (but may turn up in the continental shelf of Western Australia or in southern Indonesia). Aquarium Care: Shen's Anthias is rarely seen in the hobby. This species resembles the P. pleurotaenia, except P. sheni differ in color and gill rakers. Male Shen's Anthias (compared to the Squarespot Anthias male), lack the distinct square blotch on the side. Female Shen's Anthias are more orange (the female Squarespot is yellow), with a lavender belly. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:52:45 +0000 Striped Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=528&title=striped-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=528&amp;title=striped-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_taeniatus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_taeniatus.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_taeniatus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias taeniatus Common Names: Striped Anthias, Red Sea Anthias Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 10 - 40 m Climate: tropical Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: known only from the Red Sea. Morphology: Males have a narrow white stripe on each side of the body, which becomes more pronounced when the male is displaying. Males also have a wide stripe extending from the chin onto the ventrum. Females have red-tipped caudal lobes and are pinkish orange overall with a broad area of pink on the lower flank and a white ventrum. Biology: Occurs on dropoffs, reef faces, and outer-reef slopes. Prefers areas of strong currents. Lives in loose groups and often times, aggregates with P. squamipinnis (except P. taeniatus stays closer to the reef). Aquarium Care: A moderately hardy species that can be kept in groups in a larger tank (1 male and 8+ females). To help the Striped Anthias acclimate, provide an aquarium with plenty of hiding places, non-aggressive tankmates, and good water movement (will acclimate better with lower lighting). Can be kept in a deep water tank or a shallow water tank. Won't harm inverts. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:52:45 +0000 Hutomo's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=523&title=hutomo-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=523&amp;title=hutomo-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_hutomoi.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_hutomoi.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_hutomoi.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias hutomoi Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 54 m Distribution: Western Central Pacific: Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Philippines. Biology: A deep water species, forming small aggregations with large coral heads at the base of deep slopes in current prone areas. Usually in depths of 40 m depth. Aquarium Care: This species is not common in the hobby, but sometimes can be found. The Hutomo's Anthias should be kept in a deep-water aquarium with dim lighting. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:46:37 +0000 Pseudanthias mooreanus http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=524&title=pseudanthias-mooreanus&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=524&amp;title=pseudanthias-mooreanus&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_mooreanus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_mooreanus.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_mooreanus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias mooreanus Max. size: 7.2 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine Climate: tropical Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: French Polynesia. Also Western Central Pacific. Aquarium Care: This species is not normally found in the hobby. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:46:37 +0000 Olive Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=525&title=olive-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=525&amp;title=olive-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_olivaceus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_olivaceus.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_olivaceus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias olivaceus Max. size: 8.8 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 1 - 34 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Cook Islands, Austral and Society islands (French Polynesia), Line Islands (Kiribati), and Tuamoto Archipelago. Morphology: Males have a dusky spot on pectoral fins, the pelvic fins have a dusky margin, are brightly colored with orange patches on the side of the body and blue margins on the tail lobes and dorsal fin. The caudal lobes of males also have filamentous extensions. Aquarium Care: This species is durable, and occasionally available. It should not be kept with small zooplanktivores in smaller tanks, as the Olive Anthias can become aggressive. In a very large tank, this species can be kept in groups. One male per tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:46:37 +0000 Princess Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=518&title=princess-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=518&amp;title=princess-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Princess_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Princess_anthias.jpg" alt="41Princess_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias smithvanizi Max. size: 9.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 6 - 70 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Cocos-Keeling Islands, north to the Philippines and south to the Great Barrier Reef; Palau and southern Marshall Islands in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Appears more blue underwater and recognized by the yellow scribbles along the body. Males have a pink band on the upper lobe of the caudal fin, while females have red tail lobes. On each scale, there is a yellow spot (except those on the ventrum), and there aren't red bars on the back (like P. lori). Biology: Large aggregations occur on steep outer reef slopes and drop-offs Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places and non-aggressive tankmates. This species is not an easy one to keep in captivity. It ideally should be kept in a larger tank, and in a small group (1 male with 7 females). The Princess Anthias does best in a deep water aquarium with dim lighting, as it does not adapt well to the intense lighting of shallow water tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:46:35 +0000 Golden Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=519&title=golden-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=519&amp;title=golden-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Pseudanthias_aurulentus.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Pseudanthias_aurulentus.jpg" alt="41Pseudanthias_aurulentus.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias aurulentus (Subgenus Mirolabrichthys) Max. size: 4.6 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range - 52 m Distribution: Eastern Central Pacific: Line Islands, Fanning Island (Kiribati). Morphology: Members of the subgenus Mirolabrichthys have a thickened protuberance on the upper lip in males; both sexes have deeply incised tails. Closely related to P.smithvanizi, except P. aurulentus has 15 soft dorsal ryas, a larger eye, nd two red stripes running down the body. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places and non-aggressive tankmates. This species is rarely seen in the North American hobby. Keep only one male per tank. The Golden Anthias does best in a deep water aquarium with dim lighting. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:46:35 +0000 Orangehead Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=515&title=orangehead-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=515&amp;title=orangehead-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Orangehead_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Orangehead_anthias.jpg" alt="41Orangehead_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias heemstrai Common Names: Orangehead Anthias, Heemstra's Anthias, Redhead Anthias Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 67 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba. Biology: Found in harems. Aquarium Care: This species is moderately hardy and should be housed with non-aggressive tankmates. The Orangehead Anthias can be kept singly or in groups (1 male with 8+ females). It won't harm inverts, and can live in either a deep water reef tank or shallow water tank. The Orangehead Anthias will acclimate better when kept in a dimly lit aquarium. It will readily accept captive foods. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:08 +0000 Lori's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=512&title=lori-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=512&amp;title=lori-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Lori_s_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Lori_s_anthias.jpg" alt="41Lori_s_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias lori Common Names: Lori's Anthias, Tiger Queen Anthias Max. size: 12.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 7 - 70 m Distribution: Indo-Pacific: Philippines and Moluccas to Tuamoto Islands, south to Rowley Shoals, the northern Great Barrier Reef, and Loyalty Islands; Palau in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8. Young and females with series of red blotches over the back below the soft part of the dorsal fin, followed by a red streak onto the tail. Biology: Usually in small groups on drop-offs from 30 to 60 m or in the vicinity of caves or ledges of steep outer reef slopes. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places, dim lighting, and non-aggressive tankmates. This is a moderately hardy species that is easier to keep than most members of the Mirolabrichthys subgenus. They do best when kept in groups (1 male and several females). Only one male should be attempted except in very large tanks. Lori's Anthias will eat a variety of foods, such as frozen preparations, finely chopped seafoods, and flake food. May not eat until adjusted to the environment, and can be induced to eat with live food. The Lori's Anthias won't harm inverts and can be kept in a shallow reef or deep water reef tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:07 +0000 Lunate Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=513&title=lunate-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=513&amp;title=lunate-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Lunate_goldie.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Lunate_goldie.jpg" alt="41Lunate_goldie.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias lunulatus Common Names: Lunate Anthias, Lunate Goldie Max. size: 8.0 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 41 - 72 m Distribution: Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea, Somalia, Mauritius, and Bali (Indonesia). Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Aquarium Care: Provide an aquarium with plenty of hiding places, non-aggressive tankmates, and dim lighting. Keep one male per tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:07 +0000 Marcia's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=514&title=marcia-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=514&amp;title=marcia-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Marcia_s_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Marcia_s_anthias.jpg" alt="41Marcia_s_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias marcia Max. size: 16.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 14 - 30 m Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: known only from the Gulf of Oman and southwestern coast of Oman. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7. Caudal fin of females deeply emarginate; lower half of caudal fin of males rounded to truncate, upper half with a dorsal filament. Females orange-red in color, caudal lobe tips bright red, scale centers on lower part of body yellow becoming pale yellow or whitish on lower head and abdomen; males similar in body color but with red bar on upper side and a pale zone on upper caudal peduncle, caudal fin yellow becoming red posteriorly, dorsal filament red or yellow. Biology: Found on rocky bottoms. Aquarium Care: Provide plenty of hiding places and non-aggressive tankmates. Keep one male per tank. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:07 +0000 Fathead Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=510&title=fathead-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=510&amp;title=fathead-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Hawkfish_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Hawkfish_anthias.jpg" alt="41Hawkfish_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Serranocirrhitus latus Common Names: Fathead Anthias, Hawkfish Anthias, Sunburst Anthias Max. size: 13.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 15 - 70 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Japan and Taiwan south to New Caledonia, Fiji, and the Great Barrier Reef; Palau in Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 18-20; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Biology: Occurs inshore near coral reefs. Also occurs in small groups near caves, ledges and drop-offs. Also a solitary species, sometimes in loose aggregations. Secretive, swims upside-down. Aquarium Care: Provide a lot of hiding places, caves, and archways. This shy and delicate species does best in a low light, deep water aquarium (higher lighting will result in the fish continously hiding). It should be kept with passive tankmates, like comets, reef basslets, assessors, gobies, and dragonets. Keep singly in a smaller or medium sized tank. The Fathead Anthias will fight with other members of its species. Pairs and trios have been observed in the wild, with one individual larger than the others (probably male). In a large aquarium, if keeping more than one, try to get a pair, or find specimens that are very different in size. During collection, the Fathead Anthias is very sensitive to poor decompression. They will perch between rocks constantly and have a difficlt time keeping their position in the water. Feeds on zooplankton. This species was once thought to be in the hawkfish family, and was later moved to the grouper family. It also differs from its Pseudanthias cousins in morphology and behavior. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:06 +0000 Longfin Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=511&title=longfin-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=511&amp;title=longfin-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Longfin_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Longfin_anthias.jpg" alt="41Longfin_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias ventralis ventralis Max. size: 7.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 26 - 120 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Great Barrier Reef to islands in Oceania. Replaced by Pseudanthias hawaiiensis at the Hawaiian and Johnston Islands. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 9 Biology: Inhabits caves or coral rubble along steep drop-offs or channel walls. Secretive. Aquarium Care: This species is shy, and often times, is reluctant to eat in captivity. They can be induced to eat live brine shrimp, some frozen foods like brine shrimp, and small mysid shrimp. A refugium will help in the success of the Longfin Anthias. Best if kept with lower lighting in a deep water aquarium (temperatures 20-24ºC). Does not do well when tankmates are aggressive, and it is prone to disease. It may take this species several weeks to fully acclimate. Keep one male per tank, as they may fight, and might pick on females in smaller tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:21:06 +0000 Hawaiian Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=509&title=hawaiian-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=509&amp;title=hawaiian-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Hawaiian_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Hawaiian_anthias.jpg" alt="41Hawaiian_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias thompsoni Common Names: Hawaiian Anthias, Thompson's Anthias Max. size: 22.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 5 - 190 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Ogasawara Islands and Hawaii. Morphology: Males of this species differ from females by having a broader magenta streak on the head, with a wide yellow band on each side, a more yellow pectoral fin base with a distinct lavender V, the upper and lower lobes of the caudal fin are magenta with more pronounced red submarginal lines. Biology: Found around coral outcrops and escarpments are in less than 15 m. Feeds on zooplankton. Aquarium Care: This species is relatively hardy, and can be housed in groups in a very large tank (1 male with 8+ females). The Hawaiian Anthias acclimates best with lower lighting in a deep water reef tank, with temperatures 21 - 26ºC. It can be aggressive to smaller zooplankton feeding fish (especially other Anthias). Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:37 +0000 Damsel Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=507&title=damsel-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=507&amp;title=damsel-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Damsel.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Damsel.jpg" alt="41Damsel.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Hemanthias signifer Common Names: Damsel Anthias, Damsel Bass Max. size: 42.0 cm TL (male/unsexed); max. published weight: 680 g Environment: demersal; marine; depth range 23 - 306 m Distribution: Eastern Pacific: Playa del Rey in southern California, USA to Peru. Morphology: A sharp spine projecting anteriorly from ventral border of urohyal Biology: Probably forms schools and lives near the bottom in deep waters. Aquarium Care: Deep-water aquarium. Not much information available on this species. Feeds on zooplankton. Would most likely be quite expensive to aquire due to the depth of collection. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:36 +0000 Anthias Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=503&title=anthias-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=503&amp;title=anthias-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Anthias_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Anthias_anthias.jpg" alt="41Anthias_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Anthias anthias Common Names: Anthias Anthias, Common Anthias, Swallowtail Seaperch Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 60 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Bali and the Ryukyu Islands to the Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Australia and New Caledonia; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8 Biology: More common at oceanic islands than on continental reefs. Occurs in large groups around coral outcrops and caves of outer reef slopes. Feeds on copepods and other planktonic crustaceans or crustacean larvae and fish eggs. Aquarium Care: Does best when a constant food source is supplied. This can be through a refugium or with zooplankton cultures (or both). The zooplankton also provides a more nutritional food source and will help maintain the fish coloration. May be skittish when becoming acclimated to captivity. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:35 +0000 Anthias nicholsi http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=504&title=anthias-nicholsi&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=504&amp;title=anthias-nicholsi&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Anthias_nicholsi.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Anthias_nicholsi.jpg" alt="41Anthias_nicholsi.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Anthias nicholsi Common Name: Yellowfin Bass Max. size: 25.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: benthopelagic; marine Distribution: Western Atlantic: Virginia to southern Florida in USA and Caribbean. Also Nova Scotia to Gulf of Mexico, Guyana to north eastern Brazil Aquarium Care: Members of the Genus Anthias are restricted in their distribution to the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Like many of their relatives, members of this genus form shaols in current-prone areas and feed on zooplankton. <br /><br />1 comment mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:35 +0000 Gorgeous Swallowtail Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=505&title=gorgeous-swallowtail-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=505&amp;title=gorgeous-swallowtail-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Gorgeous_swallowtail.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Gorgeous_swallowtail.jpg" alt="41Gorgeous_swallowtail.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Holanthias natalensis Max. size: 37.4 cm SL (male/unsexed) Environment: benthopelagic; marine Distribution: Western Indian Ocean: known only from East London, South Africa to Madagascar and Reunion. Probably in Mozambique. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-19; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8-9 Aquarium Care: Members of the genus Holanthias are typically found in deeper fore-reef areas. The Gorgeous Swallowtail is not readily available to hobbyists. They should be kept in deep water aquariums with low lighting. Deep-water Anthias vary in their social structure. Feed on zooplankton. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:35 +0000 Bartlett's Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=500&title=bartlett-27s-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=500&amp;title=bartlett-27s-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Bartlett_s_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Bartlett_s_anthias.jpg" alt="41Bartlett_s_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias bartlettorum Max. size: 9.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 4 - 30 m Distribution: Western Pacific: Palau, Kosrae in Caroline Islands, Kwajalein in Marshall Islands, Nauru and Fanning Islands in Kiribati. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7 Females have a yellow back and caudal fin and a lavender body. There is a narrow violet line on the top of the head, along the anterior dorsal fin base. Males are violet with a yellow band starting just behind the eye, running along the back and onto the upper caudal lobe. The lower caudal lobe is also bright yellow. Biology: Forms groups that typically consist of several males and 30 or more females and juveniles. Also forms aggregations with the Pseudanthias dispar, Luzonichthys whitleyi, Lepidozygus tapeinosoma and the Ecsenius midas. All these species have similar coloration of yellow dorsally and pink ventrally when associating together (social mimicry). Aquarium Care: This species is one of the easiest of anthias to keep in captivity. Provide plenty of swimming room in the upper portion of the tank, as well as, a lot of hiding spots, and non-aggressive or non-competitive tankmates. The Bartlett's Anthias can be belligerent towards other anthias, and other zooplankton feeders of a similar shape. Males shouldn't be kept with members of their own kind, or even other males of the genus, except in larger tanks. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:34 +0000 Painted Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=501&title=painted-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=501&amp;title=painted-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Painted_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Painted_anthias.jpg" alt="41Painted_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias pictilis Max. size: 13.5 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 12 - 40 m Distribution: Western Pacific: New Caledonia, Lord Howe Island and the southern Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Reported from Norfolk Island. Biology: Occurs in aggregations above steep outer reef slopes. Aquarium Care: Temperature 21-26ºC, with plenty of swimming room and hiding places. This species can become aggressive towards other zooplankton feeders once it is used to its environment, however, upon acclimation, it should be kept with non-aggressive species. Live foods, such as Brine shrimp, may be required to induce a feeding response in the Painted Anthias. Can keep more than one, but only one male per tank. The male specimen may also pick on the females. The Painted Anthias will acclimate easier in a tank with lower lighting, but this species can be kept in a shallow water or deeper water aquarium. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male dies, the largest female of the social group will often morph to take its place. mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:34 +0000 Amethyst Anthias http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=502&title=amethyst-anthias&cat=519 <a href="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/showphoto.php?photo=502&amp;title=amethyst-anthias&amp;cat=519"><img title="41Amethyst_anthias.jpg" border="0" src="http://www.reeffrontiers.com/photos_fish/data/519/thumbs/41Amethyst_anthias.jpg" alt="41Amethyst_anthias.jpg" /></a><br /><br />by: mojoreef<br /><br />Description: Scientific Name: Pseudanthias pascalus Common Names: Amethyst Anthias, Purple Queen Anthias, Sailfin Anthias Max. size: 20.0 cm TL (male/unsexed) Environment: reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - 60 m Distribution: Pacific Ocean: Bali and the Ryukyu Islands to the Tuamoto Islands, north to southern Japan, south to Australia and New Caledonia; throughout Micronesia. Morphology: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 7-8 This species is bright violet in color with an orange band from the tip of the snout under the eye to the pectoral fin base. The posterior position of the dorsal fin has a large red patch in males of this species. The female Amethyst Anthias has no yellow band on the back or yellow on the caudal fin. It is closely related to the Yellowstripe Anthias (Pseudanthias tuka). Biology: More common at oceanic islands than on continental reefs. Occurs in large groups around coral outcrops and caves of outer reef slopes. Feeds on copepods and other planktonic crustaceans or crustacean larvae and fish eggs. Aquarium Care: This species doesn't do well in captivity, as it often refuses foods or becomes infected with parasites. It is best to keep this fish in groups of one male and five or more females in a medium to large aquarium with plenty of swimming room in the upper levels of the tank. Provide Amethyst Anthias plenty of hiding spots and shelter areas, and house with non-aggressive species. Keeping a refugium is ideal with this species, as it serves as a constant supply of live foods. Feed mysid shrimp, vitamin-enriched brine shrimp, and frozen preparations. The Amethyst Anthias may lose its intense coloration if not fed enriched foods. It will not harm invertebrates, but shoudn't be kept in a shallow-water reef aquarium. It will acclimate better under less intense lighting. <br /><br />2 comments mojoreef Thu, 30 Dec 2004 01:12:34 +0000