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Thread: Let's Talk About ~Foods~

  1. #16
    Hawkfish
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    Quote Originally Posted by reedman
    I am now feeding my own blender mush based on several recipes given on this site.
    I searched for them but cannot find the recipes. Do you have the link for them??
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    37g tall seahorse tank with one 150w 14K halide. I have softies, LPS and Zoas with my 4 H. Erectus. I also have a very fat mandarin that eats frozen mysis.

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  3. #18
    Butterflyfish
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    Nikki is on top of it...as usuall. Thanks Nikki!
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  4. #19
    Nurse Shark
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    New Life responded that the copper sulfate in our food is there as a trace element, also that you can find copper sulfate in the ocean and in most food item in the ocean that the fish and corals eat. Says it will not cause harm. Says it is not there to kill parisites, it is there because the animals use it in there systems. I take 2mg a day in my theragram m but, I'm not a invertabrate. Anybody with any thoughts I sure would like to hear them. Steve
    75g. 20g sump and fuge DIY, quiet one 6000 return, 1" seaswirl, 2 tunze 6100 with two singletrollers, ebo jager heater, phosban reactor, asm g-3 skimmer, cpr overflow with aqualifter. 2x 250w icecaps with 20,000k bulbs. Lots of Fun!!

    Dead tank. Killed by Tiffany D. with a tea glass aimed at me. She missed and hit the tank.
    Not so much fun!! LOL

  5. #20
    McKosker's Wrasse
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    I feed mysis shrimp, frozen cyclopeze, and plankton one time per day.

    Mysis shrimp for my fish and ornamental shrimp five times weekly. Every third day I add Zoe vitamins.

    Twice per week I treat the tank with cyclopeze for the fish and soft corals.

    Twice per week I feed the tank phytoplankton for my clam and other filter feeders.

    No algea blooms over the last few months since adding my sump/refugium.
    80 Gallon Indo Pacific Reef Tank w/29 gallon sump/refugium
    20 Gallon Minireef Tank
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  6. #21
    Mantisfreak
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    Steve,
    I actually don't know that product as it was not the one I was talking about. I don't particularly care about trace elements because I'm of the belief that water changes reduce high levels of trace elements that we get from our foods as opposed to the other way around. JMO and I don't want to steer this thread off course.

    I don't like their answer. Their product may be awesome or it may be terrible. I don't know because I've never analyzed it. I know what copper sulphate is because it is widely used by bonsai hobbiests. I obtained a large quantity of it to save the Bonsai Society of St. Louis some money. The products out there that contain it for Bonsai keepers are extremely expensive. This stuff is highly water-soluble and the fungicides that are sold to hobbiests are almost all water with a little Copper Sulphate in it. (Why have one expensive hobby when you can have two LOL). Without getting too philosophical, you can find Uranium in the ocean but I don't believe that any of the supplement manufacturers are going to be adding this to their foods as a trace element.
    Please pause before hitting enter---being nice is free.

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  7. #22
    Import Fish
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    I mix frozen foods. I take frozen mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, and blood worms and mix them together and then freeze in little cubes. I give half a cube twice a day. I also feed the fish live blood worms for snacks on occasions. I feed phyto three times a week. I used to use flake food but will never use it again.
    150g tank
    Cinnamon Clowns, Spotted Mandarin, bi-color blenny, Skunk Cleaner Shrimp, Peppermint Shrimps, Pagoda Cup Coral, GSPs, Zoos, and Mushrooms, Grn Yelllow and blue Rics, Carnation coral, Orange Sun polyps, Frags!

  8. #23
    Mantisfreak
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    There's a good article in the library from our very own TerryB.

    Better yet, how can we prevent dietary problems? Poor growth is an indicator of improper diet, or poor water quality. Substandard water conditions cause stress and therefore stunt growth. Depressed behavior is another warning sign of poor diet, undesirable water conditions, or chronic stress. Eye problems are a common occurrence in fish suffering from nutritional deficiencies. This can take the form of blindness, cataracts, or other ophthalmic lesions. It can also lead to vertebral anomalies, fin erosion, gill hyperplasia (enlargement) and skin hemorrhages. Then, of course, there is the ultimate symptom of dietary deficiency: death.

    What causes dietary deficiencies? Improperly stored foods, a monotonous diet, not using foods that adequately substitute for the natural diet and not feeding often enough or providing enough food per feeding. Do you buy fish foods in large quantities but cannot use it all within a couple of months? This may initially sound economical, but it is not. Many foods quickly lose their nutritional value. Unless kept frozen, buy only what you can use within two months. Frozen food can be kept longer. Refrigerate all non-frozen foods, even flake or freeze-dried food.
    Keeping Fish in Optimal Condition by Terry B.

    Until I read that article the first time, I never even considered the impact of time on the nutritional value of processed foods. This is definately something to think about.

    I would recommend reading the entire article and he also gives some info on HUFAs (Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acids). I don't think that we can do a proper discussion of foods without discussing HUFA's. I personally use Selcon to help in this manner. I'm curious what others use.
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  9. #24
    Butterflyfish
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    I'm with you Curt. I add selcon to my mush to ensure a higher nutritional value.
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  10. #25
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    Has any one considered adding oysters to their blender mush to boost fatty and amino acids.

    Don

  11. #26
    Great White Shark
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    Hmmm - Don, I don't know that the nutritional content would be that different than clams or mussels. I'm not sure though. I did read recently that these (oysters, clams, mussels, and the like) contain a higher concentration of metals. I'll have to see if I can find that and figure out if it would even matter.

    HUFAs were mentioned and in one of the articles I linked above there is some discussion on these along with EPAs and DHAs, as being important for the diet. Without these Omega-3 fatty acids (primarily from plants) there would be nutritional deficiencies or arrested development. Not to get too off topic, but I understand a little about DHAs in human development. These are present in breastmilk, and aid in brain development. In fact, baby formula manufacturers are now adding these to the "DHA" formula mix.

    Quote from one of the Advanced Aquarist articles I linked above:

    DHA has been shown to be important in the normal growth and development of the central nervous system, and in particular the brain, eyes and reproductive organs, while EPA is important to cardiovascular health and plays an essential role in certain immune responses. Among the common symptoms of EPA/DHA deficiency in marine animals are1) Sudden fright syndrome - shock, convulsion or even death when the animals are frightened; 2) poor vision, and reduced ability to locate prey; 3) worn or mysteriously eroding fins; 4) poor growth rates or sudden massive die offs during early development; 5) low egg viability or infertility; 6) high mortality and disease rates, particularly when under stress (e.g., shipping or acclimation), and 7) inability to properly heal after being wounded (reviewed by Rainuzzo et al. 1997; Masuda et al. 1998; Fredalina et al. 1999; Furuita et al. 1999; Sargent et al. 1999; Ishizaki et al. 2001; Holt 2003). By "enriching" food items such as Artemia with phytoplankton prior to feeding them to the marine animals being raised, the amount of EPA & DHA is often increased to the point that die-offs and developmental problems previously encountered are completely avoided (reviewed by Rainuzzo et al. 1997; Sargent et al. 1999; Holt 2003).
    Also, I found this interesting:


    However, additional research has shown that it is not sufficient to simply add a lot of EPA & DHA to the diet of marine fish. Our understanding of the role of these essential fatty acids in the diet of marine fishes has evolved from trying to determine the optimal levels of EPA & DHA in the diet to consideration of the relative ratio of EPA & DHA as well as AA (arachidonic acid: 20:4 n-6) in the diet of marine animals (Sargent et al. 1999). Simply adding these fatty acids without consideration of the ratios provided in the diet of captive marine species may ultimately be more harmful than helpful. In a recent review by Sargent and colleagues (1999), they conclude that a mixed diet is required for the healthy maintenance of marine fish species. They concluded that the best diet for larval marine fish is one that contains roughly 10% of the dry weight as Omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids with less than 5% triacylglycerols. Any other mixture resulted in a nutritional imbalance that can, in some cases, be as serious as the absence of these essential fatty acids from the diet in the first place (reviewed by Rainuzzo et al. 1997; Kobayashi et al. 2000).
    So, according to this, it isn't simply making sure they are present, but making sure they are present in the right ratios (at least for larval marine fish).
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  12. #27
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    Your way over my head Nikki. I do know that oysters contain much higher concentrations of Omega3 and fatty acids than other shelled critters. My theory is that they contain these because its whats in their enviroment. Why not use them as a food source. If they are fresh and blended they make a gross bloody mixture. This really seems to stimulate coral feeding. I think the reefers in Italy that are using HGH also suppliment with oysters. I wouldnt use HGH but I do feed oysters.

    Don

  13. #28
    wannabe reefmaster

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    i feed twice a day, frozen meatys (mysis and brine) in the morning and krill and pellets at night, once the actinics are the only light source.
    90 gallon AGA reef with 30 gallon sump
    wrasses n clowns
    polyps n anemones
    overkill on the substrate
    2 250 w 4 48" actinics

  14. #29
    Amphipod

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    Well I guess I will add a little...

    I blend up my own fish food, using a couple of different types of fish fillets, some various types of shrimp, scallops, oysters, squid, Krill. Of course I get all of the juice from these guys and drain that in the processer too along with 5 mil of Reef Plus form SeaChem. I am pretty stingy with the food that I feed all of my tanks. Everyone seems to get enough to stay healthy although youd think they aint been fed in weeks!

    The Groupers and Eel get a rotated ration of the above same ingredints its just been chopped into larger pieces. Again I am pretty tight with the food.

    Growth and colors on the Miniatus Groupers and the clowns seem to be more vivid than when purchased considerably as they are intense. Growth has been excellent as well with all growing quickly. All appear to be alert and active so I guess I am doing alright here on this... I havent had any algae out breaks to speak of, not that I am complaining of course, but most of my systems also have huge refugiums plumped into them with tons of mangroves, macro algaes and live rock rubble, so prehaps this is a mitigating factor in that.
    135 gal SPS/Clam tank w/ 140 gal Mangrove refugium
    300 gal Frag system SPS and LPS and Softies
    75 gal LPS tank
    65 gal Softies only tank
    24 gal Nano-Reef

  15. #30
    Great White Shark
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    OK - so we've touched on some points about feeding appropriately to certain species kept, and finding the balance between too much food and too little. What about storage?? How long can we store food without it "going bad"? How do you store your food, and for how long?
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