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Thread: Let's Talk About ~Foods~

  1. #31
    Amphipod
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    I wanted to add my info about feeding. I feed a combination of flake food and ground up seafood specials at the supermarket. Also since i have nonphotosynth. corals, i feed a 1/2 tsp cyclopeeze mixed with 3 tsp phyto (previously nannochlorpsis, but am now growing (or trying to )isochrsyis to get a better balance of epa and dha fatty acids). i feed this 2 x daily. no nuisance algae, however if i miss a feeding, i get a small bloom of cyano. i use a dsb.

    storing cyclopeeze the dry kind is my question - should it be refrig? i don't.
    Mysid shrimp i was using to feed, but find if they are not all eaten, they spoil quickly (or if the bag is allowed to thaw even small amt.) when using these for seahorses, i would siphon out uneaten ones.

    My phyto is refrig. after collection, and will last 1-2 weeks.

    Not a lot of experience, but found rotifers dont live more than 2-4 days in fridge, same with artemia, altho collecting young artemia - bbs - and soaking them in a solution of HUFA for 2 days, makes them more nutritious and keeps them small.
    Peace,

    Dan

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  2. #32
    Great White Shark
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    Forestal - I think it is interesting that you see cyano when you miss a feeding.

    How many of you rinse your fresh seafood to wash away any of the phosphate spray put on after catch? If you rinse, how long do you rinse for?

    I'm so excited - I found this article and it is perfect for this discussion. It was written by our very own Terry B: Feed Your Fish Better

    Here is a couple of quotes on food storage:

    Storing foods improperly will severely shorten the shelf life of foods. Sunlight, heat and oxygen break down vitamins and oils. Do you store your flake and freeze-dried fish foods at room temperature? How about the vitamins that you use to supplement the animals' diets? Store dried foods (flake and freeze-dried) in the freezer to better preserve the nutritional value. All non-frozen foods should be refrigerated. Do you reseal the food in plastic bags, before placing it in your refrigerator or freezer? What about flake food? Do you make sure that the lid is put back on tightly after each use? Fresh seafood should be frozen before use to kill potential pathogens that may be in the food.
    Freezer burn will dry out frozen foods as well as destroy the nutritional value. Take care to properly reseal any unused portions of frozen food after opening the packaging. You can purchase freezer paper and/or bags at your local grocery store. Frozen foods do not stay wholesome indefinitely. It is advisable to use any prepared or frozen seafood within three months.
    YIKES! The following quote never occured to me....I thaw at room temp. Of course I thaw food for my family in the refrigerator, but never thought about the fish food.

    Do you thaw your frozen fish foods in water? You are certainly not alone. It would be my guess that the majority of us thaw these foods out in water at least occasionally, if not consistently. Thawing foods in this manner causes water-soluble vitamins, especially B12 and C, to leach from the food into the water, thus preventing them from reaching the fish.. Thaw frozen foods out in the refrigerator instead.

    Don't be tempted to rush things by thawing frozen foods out at room temperature or higher. Bacteria on the outer margins of frozen foods thawed at room temperature will quickly reach dangerous levels while the inner portion is still yet frozen. Bacteria grow rapidly in temperatures between 45 and 145F, quickly turning the food rancid. Don't trust your nose to tell you whether or not these foods are still good. Smell is not always the best indicator. A good "rule of thumb" here is "when in doubt, throw it out". If you feed your fish foods that harbor large populations of bacteria, or are simply spoiled, it could result in an internal bacterial infection, food poisoning, or even the death of animals that have eaten tainted food.
    Other points I found interesting are that Vitamin C and Vitamin E play a role in alleviating and controlling stress in fish. HUFAs have been proven to help the fish deal with stresses. Also, tyrosine and carotenoid are used for coloration (the article talks a little more about this).

    The article is definately worth a read.
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  3. #33
    Mantisfreak
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forestal
    storing cyclopeeze the dry kind is my question - should it be refrig? i don't.
    We are probably going to have to ask TerryB. I have never used the dry kind (only the frozen). I took my frozen bar and cut it up into a lot of tiny servings. I have a Foodsaver Vacuum Sealer and froze all of these portions into very small portions. The plastic is very thick that you use from the Foodsaver but now I'm wondering if my product is usefull at all. I wonder if you could take out what you feed in a couple of months, put it in a freezer bag after each use, store it in the fridge and put the rest in one of those thick freezer bags and put it in the freezer. I truly don't know the answer, I'm just wondering out loud.

    Quote Originally Posted by Forestal
    Mysid shrimp i was using to feed, but find if they are not all eaten, they spoil quickly (or if the bag is allowed to thaw even small amt.) when using these for seahorses, i would siphon out uneaten ones.
    Dan, I really wish I would have had the chance to talk with you more at MACNA. I WILL have a seahorse tank eventually. As you know, I was either fragging my head-off or had other duties. I did tons of research and joined Seahorse.Org and found that my spare nano was really not sufficient. However, I have had the bug for quite a while now so I'm sure it's only a matter of time.

    Quote Originally Posted by NaH2O
    YIKES! The following quote never occured to me....I thaw at room temp. Of course I thaw food for my family in the refrigerator, but never thought about the fish food.
    Wow!!! Me neither. I obviously know that we should thaw in RO/DI water as opposed to tank water to remove the excess phosphates but I never once thought about doing it in the fridge. (However, I have been tempted many times because my tank water is 80 degrees and my RO/DI trashcan is not...it would be nice for it to thaw quicker). Doing it in the fridge will take even longer but I'm willing to do it if it is a benefit to my tank.

    As many of you know, I definately prefer blender mush because I can control the ingredients and phosphate levels of the foods. The only store-bought food is Cyclopeeze and I use it so sparingly that I'm curious (based on TerryB's article) if there is any nutritional value left.

    Great thread Nikki!!!
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  4. #34
    Amphipod
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    Nicki, super info, makes me want to buy all new flake food and start storing in the freezer. also the thawing info makes sense. new mysis i get will put next day's dos in the fridge over night to thaw. cool

    Curt, I lost all 5 of my H.kuda's to a bacterial infection that happened overnight. they were healthy and breeding too. so for species that are so fragile, small things like optimizing food's value and free from contamination is super important.
    I will be getting 2 erectus this december tho
    Peace,

    Dan

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  5. #35
    Mantisfreak
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    What a bummer. Good luck with the new ones. It must have been a horrible experience.
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  6. #36
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    wow I have so many question now as I always do.
    I really need to work on food storage and food prep.

    As some of you might now I have a blue tang that is looking unhealthy.

    The blue tang has caved in spots above the mouth and below the eyes. I have forgotten the Sciencetific name. But I will assume you all know it by heart.

    I have been feeding marine algae (nori right?) and all sorts of frozen foods along with dried foods. I have been feeding around 3 time a day, small portions. But have not prepping anything like posted above.

    I understand the idea behind soaking nori in RO water but I still haven't heard much about Silicon. Is that just a liquid that I can add into the RO water that I soak my food in.

    Up tell now I have been just breaking up my frozen food and soaking my nori in my tank water in a cup. But now I have alot more I need to start doing and reading up on.

    Also is there anything I can do for my tang that I'm not already? I'm really trying to get him nice and healthy.
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  7. #37
    Amphipod
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    Selco is a supplement that is made of up of HUFA . having nori on a clip to last all day plus supplemental feeding of flake/frozen i would think should be enough, but i am no expert on tangs.
    It may be worth adding selco to frozen food in smalle amounts while thawing int he fridge, but be careful, adding pure selco to the tank will tend to foul the water fairly quickly.

    Curt, yes it completley stunk. took me 3 months now just to reconsider getting more, but are the most wonderful to watch in my opinion
    Peace,

    Dan

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  8. #38
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    Hi all,

    I have had time to re-think storing foods in refrigeration. I found that refrigerating the food helps, but it can tend to contribute to the foods becoming moist. Since moisture is something that helps many bacteria to grow (they don't grow as fast between 45 and 145F) I now store all foods, including flake and freeze-dried, in the freezer.

    Cheers,
    Terry B

  9. #39
    McKosker's Wrasse
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    I thaw my frozen mysis and clams in warm tap water. I drain the water to get rid of phosphates. I add Zoe vitamins to fortify twice weekly. My tap water reads only 35 - 50 ppm on my TDS.

    I squirt the frozen cyclopeeze directly into the tank, and the fish go bonkers. The same for the phytoplankton for the clams.

    So far all fish are growing and have great color.
    80 Gallon Indo Pacific Reef Tank w/29 gallon sump/refugium
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  10. #40
    Great White Shark
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    Thanks, Terry - I think we all can benefit from properly storing our foods.

    I thaw my frozen mysis and clams in warm tap water. I drain the water to get rid of phosphates.
    Craig - did you mean to say tap water or RO/DI? RO/DI will remove the phosphate coatings because the water is stripped.
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  11. #41
    I <3 clown fish!
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    I feed only a homemade mush.. changing the recipe every batch for variety. However, frozen cyclopeeze, nori, shrimp and vitamins are always in every batch. I use only fresh seafood from the local market and soak it in ro/di water before blending to help reduce the po4. I make small amounts at a time to ensure its freshness... only making 3 ziplock bags per production. The bags are frozen and small pieces are thawed in ro/di water just before feeding time which is 2-3 times per day. I know i overfeed but i make up for it with waterchanges. When i used to use flake food, I stored it in a dark, cool area (not the refrigerator) and i would write the date purchased on the bottom and throw it away after 3 months.
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  12. #42
    Butterflyfish
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    So what is the prefered method of thawing to ensure the least amount of bacteria growth and most nutrient retention? Until this thread I just took a small cup of RO water and thawed the food in there at room temp. I am gathering I should be putting this in the fridge the night before to allow it to thaw like my foods.
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  13. #43
    Amphipod
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    i think our fish/inverts may benefit, although maybe subtley, by storing our food better.
    I also tend to overfeed, but 10% weekly water changes and my seeded sand bed keep nutrients from building up.

    this weekend i am gonna get some more fresh seafood, add phyto, cyclopeeze, blend it and freeze into a sheet.
    Peace,

    Dan

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  14. #44
    I <3 clown fish!
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    Quote Originally Posted by reedman
    So what is the prefered method of thawing to ensure the least amount of bacteria growth and most nutrient retention? Until this thread I just took a small cup of RO water and thawed the food in there at room temp. I am gathering I should be putting this in the fridge the night before to allow it to thaw like my foods.
    I do not consider bacteria growth an issue when thawing small chunks. They thaw quickly within 5 min and are fed immediately.
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  15. #45
    McKosker's Wrasse
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    Nikki,

    My tap water is super clean. 35 - 50 ppm in dissolved solids. Measured by TDS so RO/DI is not cost effective in my case.
    80 Gallon Indo Pacific Reef Tank w/29 gallon sump/refugium
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