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Thread: Bleached Coral

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    Hermit Crab
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    Bleached Coral

    Just out of curiosity, can a bleached coral "come back" to life? Like if it were in a poor tank, not receiving the proper light with bad water parameters, and it were moved to a tank with the right light and water? Or is it that once they are bleached, that's it? Just want to learn more about hard corals

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    reefer
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    Bleached corals can definately color back up if properly cared for. Try more/less flow/light depending on the type of coral. They usually bleach when given too much light and should be lowered or shaded.
    210 gallon full blown reef

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    Anthias
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    if I see one bleaching, I usually try to cut off the bleached piece so it doesn't spread. I then throw this into the bottom of my tank where it can act as a substrate for other things to spread on, etc.

    Sometimes, even months later, I see polyps reform on the bleached arm, usually starting up new coral growth from that point (ie., not spreading back to repopulate the original bleached arm.)

    I've also seen some that bleached regrow and come back to life, but that was usually from 'coral fighting', where the bleaching and polyp recession is due to an unfriendly neighbor. I separate them, and it goes back to normal.

    I guess a bleached piece can come back as started above by Faciosity, but I haven't had personal experience with this. I'm a noob though. Tank is less than a year old. When I've had a piece start bleaching due to lighting/water/disease, its usually been toast in my tank, unless some new growth starts off it way later. I only have one tank, so I've never experimented on saving the coral arm by moving it to a different environment.
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    Hermit Crab
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    We had gotten live rock from another reefer who gave us a piece of bleached coral. We put it in our new tank just to see if it would come back. Weren't sure if that would work or not. We have it out of flow range and at the bottom of the tank, farthest from the light. Perhaps it will come back

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    There is a difference between coral bleaching and tissue necrosis.
    RTN/STN rapid/slow tissue necrosis is a loss of tissue down to the skeleton. Coral die-off. It is permanent until new coral can grow over it. Many different reasons.

    Bleaching is when the Zooxanthella algae that gives the coral it's color is expelled. A semi-healthy coral can grow this back. It will start as brown and gradually return to it's native color. Typically one needs excellent conditions to see this occur.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooxanthella
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching
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    +1 on herefishyfishy

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    reefer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herefishyfishy View Post
    There is a difference between coral bleaching and tissue necrosis.
    RTN/STN rapid/slow tissue necrosis is a loss of tissue down to the skeleton. Coral die-off. It is permanent until new coral can grow over it. Many different reasons.

    Bleaching is when the Zooxanthella algae that gives the coral it's color is expelled. A semi-healthy coral can grow this back. It will start as brown and gradually return to it's native color. Typically one needs excellent conditions to see this occur.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooxanthella
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching
    DEFINATELY! If you are talking about bleaching, the color will slowly fade, if you are talking about tissue necrosis the polyps and flesh will rot away leaving a bleached white skeleton and usually some type of slimy residual substance or discharge around the dead areas. After that it comes down to which grows faster, coral or algae? Are there other corals near the ones that are "bleached"? Any changes in lighting or perameters?
    210 gallon full blown reef

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    Coral!!!!
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    herefishyfishy put it pretty well.
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    Copepod
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    I agree with herefishyfishy

  10. #10
    Anthias
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herefishyfishy View Post
    There is a difference between coral bleaching and tissue necrosis.
    RTN/STN rapid/slow tissue necrosis is a loss of tissue down to the skeleton. Coral die-off. It is permanent until new coral can grow over it. Many different reasons.

    Bleaching is when the Zooxanthella algae that gives the coral it's color is expelled. A semi-healthy coral can grow this back. It will start as brown and gradually return to it's native color. Typically one needs excellent conditions to see this occur.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooxanthella
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching
    Great post. This was the first thing I was wondering when reading this thread.Is this coral bleached or did the zooxanthella flee.
    I had a 70's vision of someone stuffing a tank with dead coral
    If we ignore the environment
    maybe it will just go away....

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