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Thread: My Toadstool has HOLES!!!! HELP!!!

  1. #1
    Wrasse
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    My Toadstool has HOLES!!!! HELP!!!

    Just as it reads. Anybody have any experience with this situation??








    This is our tanks show piece. I told my wife it was just shedding and it will be OK. Am I in trouble??
    Been shriveled up for over a week. I have had it shed for 5 days or so in the past, but never seen holes like this.

  2. #2
    Blenny
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    dang wish I knew. but I will bump the post. I can help that way.

    Sent from my Galaxy S3 using Tapatalk 2.
    180g display; 55g seahorse tank; 25g sump

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    Clownfish
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    Try taking it out and dip it in some coral dip. No promises though. Mine looked exactly like that, but it didnt make it. It was huge! Best of luck dave!! Wish i could help more.

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    Have you done any water tests?
    It almost looks like its melting from acid or some other chemical induced melting.
    What is the possibility it could be from too high salinity or too low salinity? Or maybe too low pH.
    Just throwing some thoughts out there.

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    Well, maybe not. The little one behind it looks okay.
    I would think if it was pH or salinity, the other one would not be doing good either.

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    Wrasse
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPisces View Post
    Well, maybe not. The little one behind it looks okay.
    I would think if it was pH or salinity, the other one would not be doing good either.
    Thanks for chiming in. All params are good. ALL other livestock in the tank are in good health, except a much small toadstool of the same kind. But he dont have holes. Looks like the small one is just shedding.

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    Wrasse
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandora32 View Post
    Try taking it out and dip it in some coral dip. No promises though. Mine looked exactly like that, but it didnt make it. It was huge! Best of luck dave!! Wish i could help more.
    thanks for the repy
    I have my fingers crossed

  8. #8
    Copepod
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    Are you keeping your eye out for little white/cream colored Nudibranch that eat Sacrophyton?

    Have you gotten any new frags in that they could have hitch-hiked in on?

    Sacrophyton will reproduce by fragmenting, basically just ripping apart although slowly.

  9. #9
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    Okay, I found this info in this link
    Common Toadstool Coral, Sarcophyton glaucum, Soft Coral Information, Mushroom Leather Coral Care and Coral Pictures

    Potential Problems

    The Sarcophyton genus is generally very hardy and adaptable, but can contract disease. Coral diseases are commonly caused by stress, shock (like pouring freshwater into the tank and it coming in contact with the leather), and incompatible tank mates including specific fish, or pests such as a Rapa rapa Snail which will eat them from the inside out.

    If the coral goes limp for a prolonged period of time, lasting over a week, there may be underlying conditions such as poor water quality, a predatorial snail, or a nearby coral starting chemical warfare, competing for room. Look for rotting tissue and holes that will show up under the capitulum. If the coral sheds for a prolonged period of time, aim a powerhead or return flow at the leather to clear off the mucus.

    Some diseases and treatments include:
    •Flatworms, Brown Jelly Infections, cyanobacteria
    Treat with a freshwater dip of 1 to 3 minutes in chlorine free freshwater of the same temperature and pH as the main display.
    •Cyanobacteria, Brown Jelly Infections
    These can also be treated with Neomycin sulphite, Kanamycin and other broad-spectrum antibiotics. The pill can be pulverised into a fine powder, mixed with sea water to make a paste, and then applied to the wound or affected site of the coral with a simple artists brush.
    •Necrosis, Black Band Disease
    To prevent necrosis, and fight black band disease, according to one author the corals can be treated with Tetracycline at 10 mg per quart/liter.
    •Lugol's Solution (as a preventative/cure)
    Use a Lugol's dip at 5-10 drops of 5% Lugol's solution per quart/liter of newly mixed sea water that has been mixing for 10-20 minutes. Start with a 10 minute dip and observe the reaction of the coral. A daily dip can be done until the coral is cured.
    •Amputation
    One procedure that can save a coral's life if nothing else is working is amputation of the affected area. This must be done in a separate container consisting of some of the tank's water. Cut slightly into healthy tissue surrounding the diseased flesh then reattach the coral to the substrate with the open wound cemented on part of the reef structure.
    •"Liquid Band Aid"
    For wounds that are on the side or top, some have used "liquid band aid" or super glue to seal the wound.

  10. #10
    Wrasse
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPisces View Post
    Okay, I found this info in this link
    Common Toadstool Coral, Sarcophyton glaucum, Soft Coral Information, Mushroom Leather Coral Care and Coral Pictures

    Potential Problems

    The Sarcophyton genus is generally very hardy and adaptable, but can contract disease. Coral diseases are commonly caused by stress, shock (like pouring freshwater into the tank and it coming in contact with the leather), and incompatible tank mates including specific fish, or pests such as a Rapa rapa Snail which will eat them from the inside out.

    If the coral goes limp for a prolonged period of time, lasting over a week, there may be underlying conditions such as poor water quality, a predatorial snail, or a nearby coral starting chemical warfare, competing for room. Look for rotting tissue and holes that will show up under the capitulum. If the coral sheds for a prolonged period of time, aim a powerhead or return flow at the leather to clear off the mucus.

    Some diseases and treatments include:
    •Flatworms, Brown Jelly Infections, cyanobacteria
    Treat with a freshwater dip of 1 to 3 minutes in chlorine free freshwater of the same temperature and pH as the main display.
    •Cyanobacteria, Brown Jelly Infections
    These can also be treated with Neomycin sulphite, Kanamycin and other broad-spectrum antibiotics. The pill can be pulverised into a fine powder, mixed with sea water to make a paste, and then applied to the wound or affected site of the coral with a simple artists brush.
    •Necrosis, Black Band Disease
    To prevent necrosis, and fight black band disease, according to one author the corals can be treated with Tetracycline at 10 mg per quart/liter.
    •Lugol's Solution (as a preventative/cure)
    Use a Lugol's dip at 5-10 drops of 5% Lugol's solution per quart/liter of newly mixed sea water that has been mixing for 10-20 minutes. Start with a 10 minute dip and observe the reaction of the coral. A daily dip can be done until the coral is cured.
    •Amputation
    One procedure that can save a coral's life if nothing else is working is amputation of the affected area. This must be done in a separate container consisting of some of the tank's water. Cut slightly into healthy tissue surrounding the diseased flesh then reattach the coral to the substrate with the open wound cemented on part of the reef structure.
    •"Liquid Band Aid"
    For wounds that are on the side or top, some have used "liquid band aid" or super glue to seal the wound.
    Lorie,
    Thanks so much for your research, This is very helpful.

  11. #11
    Wrasse
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaLion View Post
    Are you keeping your eye out for little white/cream colored Nudibranch that eat Sacrophyton?

    Have you gotten any new frags in that they could have hitch-hiked in on?

    Sacrophyton will reproduce by fragmenting, basically just ripping apart although slowly.
    Thanks sealion
    Mojo said the same thing, I need to look for pests!

  12. #12
    copod
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    Dave it looks to me as though it may have not shed completely, try taking a soft toothbrush to areas affected and or powerhead wash to free old skin loose. Sarcophyton acne ???

    Cheers, Todd

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    Wrasse
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJL View Post
    Dave it looks to me as though it may have not shed completely, try taking a soft toothbrush to areas affected and or powerhead wash to free old skin loose. Sarcophyton acne ???

    Cheers, Todd

    Thanks Todd,
    I will give that a try before trying to cut it up and meds.

  14. #14
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    Wow, I am not sure I would dip it in fresh water. It actually mentions that fresh water can be the cause of stress.

  15. #15
    Clownfish
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    I read that too. But it does say to make sure temp and ph are the same as the tank. Maybe thats the differance compared to just dumping water on top of it, dropping temp and ph.

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