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Thread: Rock nem and mini maxi bleaching

  1. #1
    Butterflyfish
    1guydude's Avatar
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    Rock nem and mini maxi bleaching

    Any tips for bringing the color back? I know good flow and water quality. Feeding em. Anything else? Dim my light? Mini maxis started bleaching when I added new lighting. Hoping for a bounce back.
    Also received some bleached out all white rock nems.
    Need push or shove in the right direction.
    thanks and tanks
    d
    -299g display.

  2. #2
    Surgeonfish
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    I would drop the intensity ( leds?)a little, or try and shade them ( relocate )

    Feed shrimp/prawns, other protein rich foods

  3. #3
    Emerald Crab

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    Iodine. Shrimp & shellfish contain it.

  4. #4
    want more mini maxi

    reefman069's Avatar
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    i like Marty's idea. relocate them. You can put them in my tank. lol

  5. #5
    Butterflyfish
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    I got a pic ill post up later.
    I put em all in high light areas. Most went to the underside of the rock to get shade.
    -d
    -299g display.

  6. #6
    Emerald Crab

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    Anemones have zooxanthellae. There are different types of zooxanthellae & it gives anemones their color. Zooxanthellae use light to produce oxygen. Too much oxygen is toxic to the anemone. Intense light enables the zooxanthellae to produce more oxygen than the anemone can handle, creating a toxic situation. Anemones can expel their zooxanthellae to lower their oxygen level which leaves the anemone looking faded or bleached. Iodine helps the anemone detoxify the excess oxygen without the anemone expelling its zooxanthellae. Iodine is present in sea water. It is depleated in an aquarium. Rock anemones dont naturally live in a place with intense lighting. They also eat food that contains iodine. Caution should be used when dosing iodine. I find iodine test kits are hard to read.

  7. #7
    Sea Urchin
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    I have tested oxygen levels in my reef tank for ten years and there was never an excess of it. What do you consider excess oxygen?

  8. #8
    Butterflyfish
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    I think he or she is talking about sugars that the zoanthellea are creating. My nems r prob just dumping zoanthellea. Loss of color.
    Thx all!
    D
    -299g display.

  9. #9
    Emerald Crab

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    Im a guy, my name is Mark. This is taken from U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ocean service education.
    "Zooxanthellae...Whats that? Most reef-building corals contain photosynthetic algae called zooxanthellae, that live in their tissues. The corals and algae have a mutualistic relationship. The coral provides the algae with a protected environment and compounds they need for photosynthesis. In return, the algae produce oxygen and help the coral to remove wastes. Most importantly, zooxanthellae supply the coral with glucose, glycerol, and amino acids, which are products of photosynthesis. The coral uses these products to make proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, and produce calcium carbonate." Anemones also contain zooxanthellae. Its the excess oxygen produced by the zooxanthellae that causes the problem in the anemone. Iodine helps the anemone detoxify the excess oxygen. I read somewhere to think of iodine as sunscreen for your reef.

  10. #10
    Butterflyfish
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    Mark the oxygen ur talking about is used and or expelled by the algae...
    D
    -299g display.

  11. #11
    Sea Urchin
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    Did you ever figure out the problem 1guydude?

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