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Thread: Let's Talk About ~Algae Control~

  1. #376
    Hermit Crab
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    Thanks johnmaloney

    Good to know, I didn't want the algae overtaking my tank. It already looks like it is but I am glad to hear it will be gone soon.

  2. #377
    Hermit Crab

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    "soon" in the reef hobby. lol.... You will get it one day.

  3. #378
    Emerald Crab

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    As a matter of fact it is hard not to get the brown diatoms that come with setting up a new tank, new sand, new rocks, new glass...etc. It should go away within a couple weeks if not i like to clean it out manually by scrubbing and siphoning.
    110 gallon softies reef and I am now catching the addiction to sps and lps. Help me.Hidden Content

  4. #379
    Hermit Crab

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    they deleted the post above
    Last edited by johnmaloney; 07-29-2010 at 09:31 PM.

  5. #380
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    Algae Eaters

    Algae in any kind of stored water with carbon dioxide content is a very common sight. Aquariums and fish tanks generally have exactly this kind of survival environment and thus, there are algae growths in fish tanks very often. When you have such an ecosystem in the aquarium itself, you will need something to stop this unwanted growth of algae and this is where you can have algae eaters in the aquarium along with the other fish. These algae eaters are nothing but some particular species of fish and snails, which thrive on these algae for their food. These fish also look very presentable, thus, they can be kept as aquarium fish in your home. These fishes are often fresh water fishes that survive on unwanted algae in the oceans, but there are many salt water fishes that also have this property. Hence, take a look at the following algae eaters which you can use for your aquariums if you are suffering from algae issues.

    Algae Eaters for Aquariums

    Most of the algae eaters used in aquariums are fresh water algae eaters, but there are many salt water fish too that are used in aquariums for the same reason. Some of these are small algae eaters thus, they are not even noticeable and some are fairly visible but they too are very presentable and colored to be displayed. These fish do not need to be fed the food that the other fish eat and even if they eat it, they will still make sure, your aquarium is algae free. Mentioned below are a few names of fresh water and salt water fish used as algae eaters in fish tanks, so take your pick!

    Fresh Water Algae Eaters
    The following fish are found in fresh water and can keep your tank clean by consuming the various types of algae found in it.

    * Chinese Algae Eaters: Fishes of the Gyrinocheilus genus are very commonly used algae eating fish used in aquariums. The Chinese algae eater, Gyrinocheilus aymonieri, is the most preferred one.
    * Siamese Algae Eaters: They are the Crossocheilus siamensis, and are a more gregarious and tolerant cyprinid which are almost 15 cm in length. The Siamese algae eaters are the only fish which graze on the "black brush algae" (freshwater Rhodophyta, or red algae), but can also eat anything else in preference.
    * The American-flag fish as well as many loricariid or catfish such as genera Ancistrus, Otocinclus and Plecostomus, often eat many varieties of algae.
    * Many shrimps found in freshwater like the Amano Shrimp are very well known for their ability to clean an aquarium.
    * Some species of freshwater snails often belonging to the family Ampullariidae are also excellent algae eaters.

    Salt Water Algae Eaters
    There are many salt water creatures which are also very good algae eaters. But they survive only on sea algae like red slime and others. Some of the water animals mentioned below are red slime algae eaters as well, so take a look.

    * The most common salt water algae eaters are the Rabbit fish which eats most algae, like cyanobacteria, diatoms, and hair algae. These algae are not very often found in aquariums but can be observed occasionally in a few.
    * Sea urchins are also one of the best algae eaters found in the ocean. As they strictly feed only on algae, major aquariums which are life sized and have many exotic sea fishes, can have these as their algae eaters.
    * A few snail species such as the Astraea, Turbo, Nerite and Turban, do a great job in cleaning the tanks as well, but they reproduce very fast and sometimes can graze on your plants too.
    * Surgeon fish or tangs are possibly known for their appetite for algae. They too are voracious feeders and can do an excellent cleaning job for you. More on aquarium algae control.

    With such a variety of algae eaters, you can choose any of them, depending on the sizes and content of your aquarium. But make sure, you take care of these algae eaters too, as a little maintenance is always required.

  6. #381
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    Cyano sucks!
    Hello, my name is Brendon and I am paralyzed from the shoulders down. I'm running a saltwater fish tank without arms or legs.

    Go check out the thread I started.

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  7. #382
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    good thing its a bacteria

  8. #383
    Sea Urchin
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    Quote Originally Posted by dexter View Post
    Cyano sucks!
    Definatly does, good flow will help keep cyano at bay. That along with good water quality, which we all should have anyways.
    "It's an Edmonds kind of day" Hidden Content

  9. #384
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    hello..

    thanks...

  10. #385
    Copepod

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    Quote Originally Posted by reedman View Post
    Great topic Nikki!

    Cyano - increase flow
    Hair - urchin, nudibranch, hand removal...still working on this one
    Halimeda - It won't go away, but hand removal will get most of it out
    coraline - scrape it off
    calurpa - hand removal and a good tang

    If anyone has any further tips on the hair algae I'd love to hear them

    Most of the control/prevention comes in the form of preventing nutrients from getting into the system. I make my own food, and use 100% RO/DI water for top off. To remove what is in the system (because there will always be some in the system) I use a good skimmer running a little wet and some phosban in the reactor. I tried the chaeto route, but it just didn't do much for me in my setup. It does work well for others to out compete algaes in the main tank. Primary thing is to keep detritus in suspension and remove it via skimming.
    Thanks for some good advice for a newbie!

  11. #386
    Copepod

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    How effective are lawn mower blennies for controlling hair algea that grows on the combs of an overflow?

  12. #387
    Reef Keeper
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    Kev thats not going to be a place where Blennies tend to spend a lot of time as its a little harder to hold their position. For areas like that snails are usuall your best bet or hand removal.

    Mojo
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  13. #388
    Coral!!!!
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    Sea Hares eat GHA....I speak from experience
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  14. #389
    saltygurl

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    I have been battling hair algae for a while too (bought rock from a guys tank and never saw the stuff till later). I have a Tang that picks at it occasionally, turbo snails that mow through it (again occasionally) a lettuce slug that won't touch it, a urchin that won't touch it... I do a 10% water change weekly, top off with RODI only, I am religeous about what I feed, what time and how long my lights are on. I though maybe it was briopsis but after comparing pictures I am sure it is hair algae. I read a few articles about raising the Magnisium levels. Does this work and how does it affect corals, fish & inverts? I do not mind a little algae in my tank because I think it looks natural but I do not want it to take over and cover anything else that is more important. I do not have any other types of algae in my tank and all my levels are good. So if someone can let me know if they have had experience with the Magnisium dosing let me know!

  15. #390
    Goby
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    i am currently dosing mag to kill the last of my bryopsis, @ 1600 mag. it seems to work slowly. i am not noticing a lot diff with my coral, but have heard of bleaching of sps. (also heard would kill inverts but haven't had any die) i am using tech m to dose. i would NOT recommend dosing to try to kill gha, i would check phosphates and do a water change if needed. how old are your bulbs?

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