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Candy Cane Frag Time!!

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NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
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8,568
Anthony, thought I would share my experience with the Rare Candy Cane coral, and show some special frags, as well as some one of a kind photos of a natural predator on the hunt. Rarely ever seen in the wild.

Some of you might remember last year on another board the unveiling of my rare candy cane. Well, it is that time of year again, and since the temperature here today was only 25ºF, it made for perfect fragging.

The first photo is of my Candy Canes in the basement prop tank. They have grown out and are ready to frag. Isn't the coloration beautiful!?

The second photo is of the mounted frags. It is quite easy to do....just snap off the desired length. It does take some practice to avoid "splintering" and wasted pieces. If you are a beginner, or someone with sweaty palms, I urge you to wear gloves. The defense mechanism is quite interesting, the candy cane secretes a sticky substance to ward off predators. Depending on the species of candy cane, the sticky substance could stain the skin. Wash your hands after handling. Once the candy cane is fragged, mount them using super glue gel. I've found mounting the frags on Smarties works the best. This photo is of the frags in a nano, awaiting shipment.

The third and fourth photos are from the lab's underwater camera. We have someone studying the monitor daily, trying to gain information/learn, about this ellusive creature. As you can see the juvenile Homo sapiens sapiens is on the reef seeking out the candy cane coral.

The last photo is especially interesting. Over the past 3 years I have been observing this critter. Here you can see the natural predator after getting a hold of the candy cane coral. What I find fascinating is how excited the predator becomes after ingestion. There must be something that stimulates the already speedy metabolism of this creature. You can see by the blue coloration around the mouth, that the coral's defense mechanism does little to deter the young predator. I can almost see a look of delite on this one's face, however, when I made an attempt to remove/save the candy cane coral, she became extremely agitated making a horendous high pitched noise, while flailing on the ground. I had no choice, but to give the candy cane back.

We are continuously studying these rare corals. What makes them so prevelant during the early winter months? Why do creatures that eat them respond with a "hyper" reaction?

Are you doing your part to save this wonderful coral?
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
Plack - it definately moves on its own. There have been many times I have tried to capture it, and it moves so quickly that I miss. I do keep a giant net close by at all times, so when she least expects it, I can scoop her up. I have found when packaging the candy canes for shipment, if I put a tight plastic covering on the cane, it deters the small predators. They become very frustrated with removing the cover, and they eventually give up.

It's a mini Nikki!
Lookout!
GASP!! Is that because I said she was flailing on the ground??? I have been known to try a piece of frag or two on occasion. It helps when fragging, because of the defensive chemicals present.....kind of like allergy shots....the more you are exposed, the less of a reaction you get.

Kevin!!! Come on, now.....I know you have the most coveted candy cane corals in the world stashed away somewhere!!
 

gobie

dave the gobie
Joined
Dec 2, 2004
Messages
366
Location
Auburn
Hey What Kind Of Lighting Is Required For Those Variegated Candicanes. I Hear They Recede Awfully Fast Too.
 

plack

Sea Otter
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
Messages
1,431
Location
Bothell ,WA
Na H20
I've noticed The predator has a small reach. Have you tried to place it up high out of there reach? Will they pull and tug at the landscape tearing things apart to get to it? I do know the frag need's sucrose lighting it's a mighty powerfull light and perhaps it is sompthing the predator needs at this time of the year as it is darker outside try going after the predator at night with a 1 million lux light you might get lucky and catch it.
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
gobie - plack hit the lighting right on the head. About the receding....absolutely! it is amazing how quickly the tissue recedes in the predators mouth. The predator's mouth secretes enzymes that will degrade this coral in minutes. Both creatures are fascinating!!

plack - I have attempted to place these up high, but the predator has some pretty impressive brain power, and she has gone to great lengths finding things to "climb" on. I may try to suspend them from the ceiling and see what happens. I had to keep a close eye on my nano frag tank today. When confronted about a missing coral, the predator usually denies it, but I can always tell by the coloration around the mouth, as well as the coral's sticky defense mechanism......leaving copious amounts on the hands.
 

gobie

dave the gobie
Joined
Dec 2, 2004
Messages
366
Location
Auburn
Your Situation Is Perplexing Something I've Seen Before. Not Only With Candycanes But Others In The Same Family. Your Preditor Is A Wonderful Specimen Looks To Have A Rather Pleasent Disposition. I've Seenthem In Heards Or Schools And They All React To Your Coral The Same. Good Luck With Your Situation. I Hear These Preditors Grow And Voratious Apatites.
 

CarlaW

Scarlet Begonias
Joined
Feb 8, 2004
Messages
7,670
Location
Columbia Falls, MT.
We are continuously studying these rare corals. What makes them so prevelant during the early winter months? Why do creatures that eat them respond with a "hyper" reaction?


I think That the cold weather has something to do with this. Although I don't have much recent experience with these corals, I think if you did a search on dentistry, you would find that in the long run, these corals have the ability to degrade what is in the predators mouth. Whether the predators have the ability to fight this off is an unknown. I do know that the predator has the ability to lose their teeth at a certain age, BUT THEY GROW THEM BACK, EVEN STRONGER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek:

Does any of this make any sense??????????????????

As for the hyper reaction, I have the seen the same reaction in adult size predators when Folgers is added :D
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Awww that's fragging cute! :) Just be glad that predator doesn't split!!! It's a shame the rare candy cane coral has such a short life span in captivity!
 
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