Clam Id and help

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Holygral

Holygral
Joined
Jul 15, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Ohio/US
LFS had this listed as a Maxima but I am thinking that it more resembles a Crocea, so how about some help from you clam experts, also the claim has been in my set up since Fri of last week. It has only open a very little bit(1/8-1/4 inch) and when ever any fish go near it it quickly closes.
It was wide open at the LFS in a cube with just other claims and no fish.

Parameters:
Salinty-1.206
Alk-9.6 dkh
Temp 80-82
Nitrates 2-3 ppm
Mag 1500
PH 8
Calcium 490

75 gal set up with 2x250 MH, clam is approx. 24 in from lighting, med current
 

Reeferdude

Reeferdude
Joined
May 22, 2007
Messages
513
Location
Tacoma/Puyallup Area
Looks like Crocea. The fact that it responds to movement and light is good. I've never had one wait that long to open though. Looks like your paramaters and lighting are fine. Maybe it's just a slow opener...
 

Holygral

Holygral
Joined
Jul 15, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Ohio/US
I was wondering if it could be that it was in a clam only cube and not fish that the fish scare it? Still not sure about the species though. It is attached to the rock I put it on.
 

Herefishyfishy

Smart Bass
Joined
Jun 27, 2006
Messages
6,578
Location
Mill Creek, WA
Tridacna crocea shells showing moderate symmetry, low ribs, and a lack of scutes.
Tridacna crocea is often confused with T. maxima. In this case, the more exaggerated elongation/asymmetry of the T. maxima shell is again a strong identifier. Scutes, when present on T. crocea, tend to be further spaced and smaller, as well. Also, the byssal opening of T. maxima, while being large at times, still is not as large as that of the typical T. crocea, and is more likely to be considerably smaller."



Yours shows moderate symetry with 5 to 6 flutes. Without looking at the bottom of the shell, looks like a crocea. Fish breaking the light making it close is a good sign of vitality.
 

Holygral

Holygral
Joined
Jul 15, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Ohio/US
Fish breaking the light making it close

This seems like what is happening, any suggestions on the next step, or just leave it alone and it will adjust to the new environment, also in the close state should I try and remove it to feed it in a separate container?

Thanks !
 

TWallace

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
454
Location
Edmonds, WA
It's clearly a crocea. The second, high res, pic looks fairly healthy. The first looks pretty unhealthy though. Generally if you can see the top edges of the shell with no mantle covering it, something's wrong. I'm hoping the high res pic was taken after the smaller one, which would indicate the clam is getting better.
 

Holygral

Holygral
Joined
Jul 15, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Ohio/US
The high res pict was taken second, the clam is VERY sensitive to light movement and/or fish movement, he is starting to move about the flat rock I placed him on. With so many people dead sure which species it is and every one being positive, I am no father ahead than when I started. I know ID is difficult but still not sure now>

PS the pict were taken the same day with different cameras
 

TWallace

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
454
Location
Edmonds, WA
With so many people dead sure which species it is and every one being positive, I am no father ahead than when I started. I know ID is difficult but still not sure now>
I'm not sure what you mean. The only IDs I've seen are saying it's a crocea, which I'm sure it is. The only person who said maxima was the LFS. It's lacking the big scutes on the sides that maximas always have. That's the easiest way to tell. Though croceas do have scutes, especially after years in captivity, the maxima's are more noticeable.
 

Holygral

Holygral
Joined
Jul 15, 2006
Messages
697
Location
Ohio/US
Tridacna crocea shells showing moderate symmetry, low ribs, and a lack of scutes.
Tridacna crocea is often confused with T. maxima. In this case, the more exaggerated elongation/asymmetry of the T. maxima shell is again a strong identifier. Scutes, when present on T. crocea, tend to be further spaced and smaller, as well. Also, the byssal opening of T. maxima, while being large at times, still is not as large as that of the typical T. crocea, and is more likely to be considerably smaller."
 

chris&barb

Reef-Geeks
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
938
Location
Purple Parrot
it is 100% crocea. look at the thread i linked and it should tell you everything you need to know to positively ID this or any other clam.
 

Reeferdude

Reeferdude
Joined
May 22, 2007
Messages
513
Location
Tacoma/Puyallup Area
Not only that it's attached to the rock you put it on. A chacteristic of Crocea. From what I've read, in the wild and perhaps even in captivity, they secrete a corrosive that allows them to burrow deep into rocks for protection. Having a rock under it or a rock just under the substrate may help it out live other Crocea on sand or gravel...Your clam should close when fish go near it, or it's light is blocked. That's a good thing. Means it's responding. Maybe the water quality at your LFS wasn't very good and it's just taking a little time to adjust. Oh, and make sure the flow isn't blowing into his little incurrent hole...Lol
 

DonW

R.I.P.
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Messages
8,751
Location
Tacoma, WA
:lol: What you got there is some gooood eatin.:) Its a not so thrilled crocea. Take a full tank shot of your tank and a complete list of everything living in it as suggested above.

Don
 
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