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Copper Sulfate in Foods

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NaH2O

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Jan 25, 2004
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I was looking at ingredients to some frozen foods available to hobbyists, and wondered why some contain copper sulfate (including an invert formula)? It is one of the last of the ingredients on the list, but would this build up overtime and create problems? or would the amount be so small that it doesn't matter?
 

Boomer

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Copper is an essential trace element and is a constituent of plants and of animal and tissues. I'm sure there is some accumulation but know ones has to how much or what effects it would/may have other than Ron s' studies.

For one thing the Cooper isn't beamed to another galaxy as I think some think :D
 

wrightme43

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Jul 1, 2004
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bowling green ky
My new life spectrum has copper sulfate in it, At first I just thought it was the thera A but continued searching has found it in all new life spectrum foods. I e-mailed the company and was not satisfied with the answer I was given. I tried buying other foods but I just was not happy with the results. I really like the color and energy my fish have when I feed the marine pellet. I do frequent large water changes so I dont think it will be a issue but it is there. Thanks Steve
 

Maxx

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Jul 31, 2003
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Collin,
I have also heard that ethoxyquin is a pesticide that is sometimes used as a preservative. Is this something to be concerned about or just a groundless worry?

Nick
 

cwcross

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Aug 18, 2004
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Most anti-biotics or pesticides are highly water soluble. Many are also surface active. Water soluble compounds will be effectively removed via water changes. Also, if surface active, they are amenable to skimming. Furthermore and most importantly, antibiotics are reactive molecules. Their half-lives, especially in a very bright light, are generally pretty short. Based on the name, I would classify Ethoxoquin as an antibiotic...not a pesticide. Antibiotics are expecially reactive and short lived.

What this means is that as long as such molecules are added in minute quantities that they will GENERALLY degrade quickly and/or be exported. Things that degrade quickly will not cycle up.

Things that are water soluble but do not degrade quickly can cycle up, but will be limited to levels dependent on the size and frequency of water changes and their skimmer efficiency.

Of course it is better not to add such if possible. For accidental or incidental addition in small quantities, this is not something to worry about for most cases.

Collin
 

cwcross

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Aug 18, 2004
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Just read Nikki's post...very helpful. Ethoxoquin is considered an antioxidant. Antioxidants are VERY reactive. In a salt water aquarium these will be gone in no time...I wouldn't worry at all even at fairly high levels..like in dog food. They might kill some plankton but then they'll be gone...Collin
 

cwcross

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Aug 18, 2004
Messages
250
Boomer said:
These are the only toxicity studies I could find on aquatic life. The stuff is not only a antioxidant but also a carcinogen and was original developed as preservative for rubber tires :lol:

http://preview.pesticideinfo.org/List_AquireAll.jsp?Rec_Id=PC35089

The minimum LD 50 for the most sensitive organism in the kill studies was 1900 ppm. You could practically drink this stuff...just kidding of course. Quite non-toxic. You would have to put several cups of pure powder into a 100 gallon to reach this dosage. A few ppm in food that gets further diluted won't be a problem. It will degrade before getting any where near a problematic level...Collin
 
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