Quantcast

Coral Skeletons and PH

Help Support Reef Frontiers:

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
I have been hearing that coral skeletons can keep your PH at an even level without having additives, is this true? How would they impact alkalinity? I have seen them in freshwater tanks for stuff like discus and other fish that like high ph levels. What are your thoughts?

Thanks
 

wrightme43

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2004
Messages
4,355
Location
bowling green ky
This is just my opinion, I believe if the ph got acidic enough to dissolve the coral skeleton, it would be to late for your fish. My understanding is that in a deep sand bed the aragonite will dissolve because of the acids produced by bactierial metabolisim, I have heard that it will keep ph and buffer at a more constant level, though I think Kalk or 2 part is the way to go. I guess if you left them in there for years and years they would dissolve, but then again live rock is coral skeletons and if it dissolved we would all be pretty upset. I hope that helps you. Steve
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Thanks for the posts. I was wondering the effects because I have seen dead corals used in refugiums along with live rock.
 
Last edited:

Witfull

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2004
Messages
647
Location
New Jersey
in an acidic environment, corals (skeletons,crushed) will leach off alkali and calcium and other trace elements. agronite will also. in a fresh water tank this can be deadly. for fresh water rift lake cichlids and saltwater tanks, it helps when used as a substrate due to lowered pH in the lower levels of the bed to to decomposing organics. calcium reactors also use this principle to desolve coral by the use of CO2 to lower pH and release the calcium.

dead corals become live just by being in saltwater, plus rubble and skeletons make great homes for pods in a fuge.
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Witfull said:
dead corals become live just by being in saltwater, plus rubble and skeletons make great homes for pods in a fuge.
Do you mean by coralline algae and other stuff growing on it? I knew about the great home for pods. Thanks
 

Witfull

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2004
Messages
647
Location
New Jersey
it doesnt hurt, but it also depends onthe primary porpose of your fuge. if you want it as a pod farm then loads of rubble with nooks and crannies is great. if your ant your fuge as a macro farm for nutrient expot then limit the amout of rock to allow space for the algeas to grow.

or you could split the difference and have a layer of rubble a few inches deep and then macros above.
 
Your email address will not be publicly visible. We will only use it to contact you to confirm your post.
Top