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Cyanobacteria

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Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
When I get a few minutes here and there, I like to organize my favorites by category. I came across one of my favorites on Cyanobacteria that I thought I would share. It's not about reef tanks at all. It's about cyanobacteria in the ocean.

It's so odd that we have the same problems in our reef tanks as they do in the ocean. We add phosphates with our foods, tap water, etc. They get phosphates from fertilizers in runoff water. The phosphates bind to our sediments...it also binds to their sediments. Low water flow makes things worse in the ocean...it makes things worse in our tanks. Etc., etc., and so on. They have to deal with the exact same issues....nutrients, phosphates, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, lighting, etc.

Oh well, I just forgot I had this link and wanted to share after finding it. To those who are interested, and want to wander around the site, here ya go....
NSW Algal Information
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
Awesome, Curt. You know me and my links...I can never have too many :D

Great info!
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
They get phosphates from fertilizers in runoff water. The phosphates bind to our sediments...it also binds to their sediments.
Interesting point. I would think the diversity of critters and the volume of water would keep problems from arising. It really puts the closed system in perspective. How "trapped" everything is....and how important it is to get rid of excess nutrients before they cause major issues. Another interesting point, is the areas in the wild that have issues like:
nutrients, phosphates, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, lighting, etc.
What role does "survival of the fitest" play? Some corals would not be able to survive in certain areas, yet we take those same corals and try to force them to thrive in nutrient filled, closed systems. Anyone have opinions on this?

Along similar lines - here are a few links on Dinoflagellates. If anyone has had the experience of Red Tide, then you know all about the effects Dinoflagellates have on humans. I had the enjoyable experience of Red Tide last summer.

Dinoflagellates

Dinoflagellates and Red Tides

Dinoflagellates, or was that "Boogers with Bubbles?"
 

Beeba

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
Messages
300
Location
Portsmouth, OH
I'm so glad Curt posted this info on cyanobacteria. In another thread I discussed the problem I had with it. I've been cleaning it off my sand and rocks a couple of times a week. Now that I discovered the salt I was using was high in phosphates I took it to my LFS and they called Instant Ocean. Of course they didn't want to take the blame. The owner of the LFS actually works another store about 40 miles away so he is never in to talk to me but he happened to be there the day that I went in and he seemed concerned but now they don't seem to want to do anything about it. I asked about an exchange and you would have thought I spoke another language. I bought my tank, stand and almost all of the extras from his store so I hope they make it good. His answer was, "I have phosphates in my big tank at the other store and it doesn't hurt anything."

Anyway, this link is a big help. Thanks again!!!
 

Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
OK...Beeba, I like you already just because you posted a link to Michelle's website. I consider her a dear friend.

However, back to the topic at hand. Yes, phosphates can come from salt mixes as well as many other things. Here's a good thread on the subject Phosphates
 
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