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Do You Drink the RO DI water

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wrightme43

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Jul 1, 2004
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bowling green ky
I have recently heard from someone it is not healthy to drink RODI water. I would like to have some other peoples input on this. I drink it, make coffee, tea, coolaid, feed it to my pets, and use it for my reef tank.
If there is a medical reason I would like to hear about. If it is a personal opinion please share that as well.
If I am doing something dangerous (again) lol, Please let me know why you feel that way.
Thank you All.
STEVE
 

FishBoyNB

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Nov 1, 2003
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59
Location
North Bend, Washington
Steve,

Reverse osmosis systems can remove TDS (total dissolved solids) up to approximately 96% to 98% and higher for distillation systems. De-ionizing (DI) cartridges utilize a premium mixed bed of DI resin and a 5-micron spun bonded polypropylene post sediment element for increased dirt-holding capacity. DI filters should be used where residual dissolved solids (TDS) are unacceptable for certain specialized applications. (Close to 0 ppm of TDS purity is normally achieved if used in conjunction with an RO or distillation system). DI filters are normally used as a polishing filter to remove residual TDS (total dissolved solids) after a Reverse Osmosis or a Softener for ultra pure water close to 0 ppm.

No need to worry from what I've read.

Dan
 

wrightme43

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bowling green ky
Thanks Man, My ro di unit puts out 0 tds to a high when I change deion resin of 1 tds.
Any other opinions, medical evidence, thoughts and reasoning?
Steve
 

ScottT1980

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Jan 19, 2004
Messages
129
Location
Raleigh, NC
I have had some disagreements with others regarding this...

If you run a marathon, I flat out would nor reccomend drinking RO/DI water a) because it tastes bad and b) I really feel like it can soak out some needed electrolytes. In normal day to day life, I doubt it would one would incur much of an effect.

The debate with me has always been, "could it be a potential risk?" To this I say yes, in very unusual circumstances, especially in comparison to tap water. However, I would never say it was dangerous. There is probably a greater chance of getting struck by lightening and attacked by a shark within the same hour, than dying due to the depletion of electrolytes through RO/DI consumption.

I base this solely on what little physiology background that I have, although I have seen people with an M.D. (not that this neccesarily means a whole lot, although I think it does have its value) make similar claims.

Take er easy
Scott T.
 

wrightme43

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bowling green ky
If it is the electolyte balance, I was on a nuclear submarine, we distilled seawater to total purity,for the reactor. That was the same water we drank, and we used to crack to oxygen and hydrogen. The water had to have potassium hydroxide added so it would conduct electricity so it could be cracked.
TDS meter measure the ability to conduct electricity (my understanding) If that water is able to be consumed why cant rodi water be consumed?
I am trying to understand why I was told not to drink it.
Steve
 

ScottT1980

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Messages
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Raleigh, NC
No worries Steve...

I have been told it is an urban myth, with which I disagree as I think it is physiologically possible, just highly unlikely. Sounds like a job for the myth busters.

Take er easy
Scott T.
 

ScottT1980

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Raleigh, NC
Well, check out their message boards, you might see a familiar topic posted by a familiar name :) LOL

While I often notice glitches in their "scientific process" and reasoning, it is something that is actually easy to accomplish. However, I don't see their ratings getting a boost from such a study. ;)

Take er easy
Scott T.
 
Last edited:

dwall174

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Jun 3, 2004
Messages
121
Location
Southeastern MI
Most of the combination RO/DI/Drinking water units will have a “T” just before the DI so that the drinking water is just RO! I have tried both RO & RO/DI & don’t care for it! There’s no taste to it & being that all the minerals are removed there’s no real benefit from it. I have noticed that only the Medical-grade Non color-changing DI cartridges are FDA Approved for drinking water. ARS Is the only one I know of that offers a FDA approved DI cartridge!

My water here is pretty good only around 120 TDS so, For me all I have is one of those little in-line carbon filters from Home Depot that is connected to my refrigerator’s water/ice maker!
 

dwall174

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Kind of makes you wonder if all those color changing DI cartridges are not FDA Approved! Why would you want to use them for your tank?
 

ScottT1980

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Raleigh, NC
Does it cost to obtain FDA approval? I wonder if it is a manufacturer cost issue, or if the items simply have never been submited for approval. Could just be the usual FDA backlog or a hiearchy of importance. I don't know how the bueracracy works. I doubt it is a "consumption" issue, although perhaps some resins or membranes (or whatever) really aren't safe for us. FWIW, I did get a nice response on the myth buster website LOL.

Take er easy
Scott T.
 

dnjan

alveopora
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Sep 9, 2003
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Seattle
Not specifically RO/DI water, but soft versus hard water generalization:

The first time I had dental X-rays taken after moving to Seattle (soft water) from the Midwest (hard water), the Dentist told me that he could tell from my bone density that I had not grown up in Seattle. I wonder then, if drinking RO/DI long-term (especially by children) would also contribute to lower bone density?
 

dwall174

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Southeastern MI
ScottT1980 said:
I doubt it is a "consumption" issue, although perhaps some resins or membranes (or whatever) really aren't safe for us.
I think it has something to do with the dye that’s used on the resin for the color changing process not being FDA Approved?
 

gobie

dave the gobie
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Dec 2, 2004
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Auburn
actually it cost about 35000.00 to obtain certification because it must be done in an EPA recognised labortory. first round of tests are done on system water (tap) second tests are done on lab dirty water each sample batch is passed thru purifiers about 1000 gallons then tested along with samples of membranes and samples of resins. then the usual round of lab test then filing fees red tape.
 

gobie

dave the gobie
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Dec 2, 2004
Messages
366
Location
Auburn
most bottled water is distilled (a certain percentage any ways) or ran thru carbon filtration call any water supplier and ask for labortory grade water culligan is the only one i have found so far and cost twice as much. if ro water was so bad why would they sell it in safeway, and those other stores that have the water machines (glacier , purfil, etc.) if you are that worried just get a bottel of electroright and add to it. other than that drink away folks and enjoy knowing we aren't drinking mercury and arsinic and pcbs
 
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