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aquariumdebacle

electrolyte addict
Joined
Jul 4, 2003
Messages
613
Location
Seattle
Recomendations usually run the gamut from 1 or 2 inches per gallon to feet per gallon. I would like to know how many yellow tangs I can cram in a hundred gallon tank on a permanent basis. I have a good protein skimmer, trickle filter, sand bed, and an upstream refugium. Right now I have 20 chromis damsels, five gobies, and some shrimp (including a pistol.) I would like to add ten to twenty yellow tangs in the small to medium size range all at once. I have adequate hiding places for all.
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
Dan - funny that you should start this thread, as I was considering a similar one. I've often wondered if there was perfect filtration, how you determine stock size? Should we take more into account territory size as opposed to fish size? Consider where the fish swim (i.e. mid tank, bottom, etc)? Perhaps learning/understanding more about fish interactions and behavior with other species and their own species would help with stocking.
 

iamjosh

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Messages
265
Location
Spokane, WA
10 - 20 Yellow Tangs in Addition to the 20 Chromis.. all in a 100 Gallon Tank? WOW.. That's all I can say All told in my 125 + 75 Sump I don't even have 20 fish Yikes.. but man that sure would be an active tank.

Snap a pic of the 20 Chromis and everything else I'd love to see that tank :)
 

DonW

R.I.P.
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Messages
8,753
Location
Tacoma, WA
I would'nt add more than two or three at one time. I think the huge bioload increase of 20 tangs would cause problems. I also disagree with the ?/inch per gallon thing. All systems are way to different. I could'nt imagine the problems 20 damsels would cause in my daughter 20g nano.

Don
 

jlehigh

Hermit D Crab
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
1,208
Location
Kirkland/Juanita
From my research on Tangs I have decided to stay to 1 Tang per 90 gallons of water. Not because of the Bio-load but due to the nature of tangs. Tangs are a roaming fish unlike many of our other reef fish wich take ownership of a smaller area. They swim large distances feeding on algeal growth. I am not sure how much of a bio-load impact each fish will have, though I try my best to meet the needs of the animals when in a natural env (even though we all fall short). I will limit my 300 gal to 3 Tangs of different shapes.
 

Witfull

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2004
Messages
647
Location
New Jersey
tangs are wierd,,,in pairs or threes,,they fight alot and one gets the worse end of the deal...but in shoals, the agression is spread out and there is little injury to any one fish. unfortunately we really dont have tanks big enough for a shoal of adult yellow tangs.

but diving of of kaneohi, hawaii and seeing a shoal is an awesome site!
 

Terry B

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Messages
162
aquariumdebacle,

I hope that you are testing my sense of humor. How many people can you cram in your house? LOL. Just in case you are serious, or someone else that may read this could be considering doing something similar, I will respond as if you actually plan to put 20 tangs in your tank.

One of the first things that we should do before acquiring any animal is to research it and gain a good understanding of all of its needs. We should know a great deal about what the species requires in the way of habitant, and diet along with an idea of what it will be compatible with prior to purchase.

Crowding comes in two forms. First, crowding can be a matter of inadequate personal space. This is frequently a problem when stocking an aquarium too heavily. Crowding can also be a matter of placing any one specimen in an aquarium that does not have enough swimming space or the biological filter and chemical balance of the aquarium cannot withstand the load. In your example, the fish would not have enough personal space and the chemistry of the aquarium, including the biofilter, would probably fail.

The behavior of the fish can be a very good indicator of whether or not they are overcrowded. However, it takes being familiar enough with the species and how they normally behave to make a good judgment. If you closely observe each specimen in your aquarium on a daily basis, you will soon become so familiar with them that you will immediately notice any behavioral change. Behavioral changes are an early warning signal that may indicate stress or illness. Chronic stress inhibits immune function affecting the health, beauty, growth and longevity of your entire stock.

Cheers,
Terry B
 

Terry B

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Messages
162
One more thing, always consider the adult size of any species, not thier present size.

Cheers,
Terry B
 

Elmo18

Clownfish
Joined
Aug 5, 2003
Messages
2,662
Location
Seattle
I have dived off Kaneohe also ;) and it is great. I used to live on O'ahu for about 8 years and did some nice diving.

While I would say that it is not a humane way of keeping 20 yellow tangs, I'm sure it is possible to keep them like that. Of course, the system must be able to handle that type of bioload (i.e. feedings, poop, etc).

Not to mention, chromises get big, too. :)


- Elmo
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
I think Terry is right. In order to create happy fish they have to have a home that is similar to their natural habitat. I don't think I would ever see 20 tangs swimming fin to fin in a circle and then having to fight for food in the same area. My tank has one small fish (all under 5 inches each) per ten gallons. This doesn't include the cleaning crew. This idea would cut your tang tank to ten tangs but I wouldn't probably have more than six to eight if your doing the chromis too.
 

Noonan

Active member
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Messages
43
Location
New Jersey
When I had my 125 gallon setup, I had 6 yellow tangs. I bought 5 and for some reason they all fought. It was either take one back and see how that works out, or buy another. I bought another and rearranged the tank while dripping him. Added him and they all got along fine.

I had a 1000gph pump, wet/dry, nice skimmer (forget the brand). I sold it ALL for $300 :(
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Noonan said:
When I had my 125 gallon setup, I had 6 yellow tangs. I bought 5 and for some reason they all fought. It was either take one back and see how that works out, or buy another. I bought another and rearranged the tank while dripping him. Added him and they all got along fine.

I had a 1000gph pump, wet/dry, nice skimmer (forget the brand). I sold it ALL for $300 :(
Wish I knew you when you were selling that set up!!!!
 

wrightme43

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2004
Messages
4,355
Location
bowling green ky
I don't know if you are just joking or not so here goes. If I wanted 20 tangs in a 200 gal. I would set up a 75 with lots of light. I would add lots of live rock in small pieces, I would put red gracilla, and other feeding algaes in this tank with no fish. I would swap out the live rock as the tangs ate the algaes. I would triple or quadruple the filtration. I would do a 25% water change every week. I think it would be very beautiful if it worked. In my opinion, you would have a 40-50% chance of succsess. I don't do anything with live animals when I have less than 80% in my opinion. I think you would start to see very odd behaviors from you fish. Sorta like prison gangs, or people in very crowded cities. I live in ky and I think the reason people are so friendly here is they have room to get the heck away from each other. I was in the Navy on Submarines and went all over the world. In my opinion crowded cities have meaner people, open country has calmer folks. I would expect the same result in a tank. I hope this helps you, and if it does work. I WANT TO SEE IT!!!!!! I can totally understand why you would want it. I can imagine it and what I see would be beautiful. Steve
 

Ritsuko Nashida

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Yokohama Japan
FWIW, unless you got a really big system of at least 500 plus gallons on the display alone...I couldnt see it with even 10 tangs much less 20. Granted thats just my opinion, and that doesnt hold a lot of weight. But your talking about 10 or more fish that are going to get about 7 inches long when completely grown, can be a bit teritorial to a degree especially within its conspecifics, needs some decent swiming room and will want to graze at least a little from time to time. That indeed would look cool to be sure but I am not sure thats the wisest idea. 20 Damsels in a large tank is one thing and even then they still will peck at each other a bit from time to time. But unless the tank is really big I think this is seriously pushing the raged edge on 10 plus Tangs. You could get small ones of course...but small ones get big sooner or later.

Of course it is your tank and I could very well be wrong. Prehaps someone here knows something I do not or that I over looked. I just feel like there are other venues you could take, thats all....

JMHO...Good Luck!
 
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