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Miniature Anemonie?

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Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
I have a few of these things that look like miniature anemonies. They are clear in color and one has blue tips. The biggest one is the size of a quarter when fully open the rest are dime size. Any ideas? Will these get any bigger? They look really cool hiding in their little nooks and crevices and don't seem to be hurting anything. They even feed like an anemonie by catching food that floats by. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Identical, cool thanks. Here is what I found on them but it makes them sounds pretty bad?
Pseudocorynactis spp. are like Corynactis but are much larger (to about six inches (15 cm) diameter, and usually not colonial. They also reproduce by fission, but it is unusual to find more than about six clones together as a group. The so-called orange ball anemones that can be observed on coral reefs at night are Pseudocorynactis spp. The column varies in color from cryptic shades of brown to orange, red and magenta. The tips of the tentacles are commonly bright orange, but they can also be white. These tentacle tips are extremely sticky, like flypaper, due to the presence of powerful nematocysts. This fact makes the larger species from the Indo Pacific region unsuitable for aquariums housing fishes, which they readily capture. They also can catch mobile invertebrates such as shrimps and snails, and sometimes "attack" sessile invertebrates growing on adjacent rocks, enveloping them in the gastric cavity through a widely opened mouth. Pseudocorynactis spp. can be fed daily, but only require twice weekly feeding to keep them healthy. If they are not fed frequently enough, they shrink. There is a marked behavioral difference between the common Caribbean and Indo-Pacific species.

The Caribbean species, Pseudocorynactis caribbaeorum mainly opens its tentacles at night, and closes rapidly when it senses light. The Indo-Pacific species remains open both day and night, and is not sensitive to light. The presence of food smells (dissolved amino acids) in the water stimulates either species to open up and extend the tentacles, and the caribbean species can be trained to open in the light by feeding it during daylight hours. The mechanism for its apparent memory is not known.
Whether you have a large reef aquarium or a simple small aquarium, any of the corallimorphs can be easily maintained and enjoyed for decades.

Mine aren't as big as this article says they are but I guess I will keep an eye on them. I have about 7 that I can see in my tank. Any advice on them?
 
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Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
This fact makes the larger species from the Indo Pacific region unsuitable for aquariums housing fishes, which they readily capture
I really wouldn't worry about it until they get very large. There are a lot of different species and many of them don't ever get big.

There are a number of mushrooms that are capable of eating fish when they get large. Look at the size of your specimens and the size of your fish and make your decision whether or not to allow them to stay. You could even frag them for other people.
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
Well as slowly as everything grows in my tank I think I can wait a long time before I have to worry about them. I found a pink colored one under a rock today. Thanks for the feedback.
 
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