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aloha_ssn

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2004
Messages
21
Location
Bluford,IL
hello
first off i would like to say thank you for having this site cause i have learned a lot hear already and have only been looking of a week.

ok i'm thinking about starting a 55 or 70 gal. tank but don't know where to begin. i know that i need to look at the floor to make shore that it will hold the weight and i know that i will have to get some rewiring done first,but other than that i don't know where to go. i'm thinking of having soft corals and like one giant clam but i would like to have the ability to have expand that as my knowledge and ability to keep them grow.

i've read so mutch about drilling the tank, is this necessary for this size tank? do i really have to have a sump, although i'm seriously considering it. any advice will be most welcomed because i don't fully trust the LFS as i have just moved and have not yet talked to them but it has been IME that are more interested in the sail that helping you to learn about the hobby. :D
 

wrightme43

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2004
Messages
4,355
Location
bowling green ky
Welcome Glad you are here. A 55 will wiegh about 550 lbs stocked and running. One thing I really like about having a sump is that all of the stuff is hidden, and you have a great place to drip your makeup water and kalkwasser.
One of the best things IMHO you can do is invest 30$ in a book called ( The Conscientious Marine Aquarist) by Robert M. Fenner ISBN 1-890087-02-5
It is very helpful, and a great refference when you need it.
I noticed the ssn does that refer to submersible ship nuclear?
If so I was on SSN-753 if not forget it. LOL
Here are two simple things I have learned so far. one be very paitent, two, frequent water changes are the most effective way to keep your animals happy.
One more dont try to save money on equiptment. I just end up buying the good one after spending the money on the one that broke and cost me more money. LOL
Just my opinion but since it is usually only 70$ more with a stand a 75 gallon tank seems to be the best value going. I got mine with stand and glass lid, plus a light I sold on ebay for 299$
Buy good quality live rock and let it cure by itself in your tank for a while.
And probley the best thing I have ever found is this website If you ask someone will know or at least tell you what they think. LOL
HTH you. Steve
 

aloha_ssn

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2004
Messages
21
Location
Bluford,IL
wrightme43 to your question on the ssn yes it does i was on the SSN-724.
thank you for the help but this is only starting the proses. i'm thinking of having a sand bed with the live rocks as every thing that i have read so far point to this being a good idea for a smaller reef as i will have and i hope this stards a good talk on how to go that way i can get alot of ideas as i have someny questions but i know read read and some more reading is in store befor i start puting it together.
 

johnehr

Ignorant and Oblivious
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
210
Location
Seattle
Right now you should read, read, and read. Maybe try to find some reefers local to your area.

The best way to get set up affordably is to buy someone's entire setup that is getting out of the hobby. I ended up buying most of my equipment used. I got my tank, stand, lights, protein skimmer, sump, pumps, etc. all used. Even most of my live stock was from other people's tanks. It really helps mitigate this expensive hobby. Also I do not recommend buying live rock at a local fish store for $6 or $7 per pound. You can get better rock delivered off the internet much cheaper.

If you want a nice clam, you are probably going to have to go Metal Halide lighting which is more of an investment than other alternatives (power compact of very high output flourescent[VHO]).

I have a 60 gallon tank and did not drill. They sell pumps called powerheads that suction cup to the side of your tank and give good water flow. Also you can get an hang off the back overflow box to have water syphoned into your sump and pumped back to the tank via a return pump. (I even have a 10 gallon tank set up as a refugium.) Right now if you can I would drill your tank (I know I wish I did). You might not want to, because once you get into the hobby more, you might find out that you wished you did it differently...
 

wrightme43

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2004
Messages
4,355
Location
bowling green ky
I dont know. I think it has more to do with the time period between photos and the settings on the camera. I know it stays cleaner and looks alot neater with a sump. I think they are a great investment in your happiness. I really like the way it clears the back wall of the tank and that everything is one central location easing maintence, and hiding the things that keep the system running from people who drop by. Another big bennie to me is that deterius builds up down there so when I do a water change I pump the water to the tank while it drains emptying the sump and I can vacum the junk out with a shop vac.
I would recomend these things as nessecitys.
One a fire alarm, (being off of subs you know why) lol
two a fire extingisure. (ditto)
three a american dj power panel or two very handy to be able to switch of and on individual pumps and items and having a circuit brker with a fuse is insurance. Power strips have caught on fire under tanks in the past and I am sure the will again
four never run out of salt you may need it at 2 am when the fish store is closed
five a quality rodi unit, I have one from ebay 100 gpd makes 0 tds water for 120$ or less delivered, mine is by aquasafesystems
six this hobbie is addictive, it seems that everyone wants a bigger tank or tanks and needs room for just one more coral. LOL
Hey pm about what you did on subs. I was a sonar man on the albany. Northern Runs baby. LOL be wery wery quiet, were hunting wussians. LOL
HTH Steve
 
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