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Peacock Mantis pics!

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Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
Johnny, great pics!!!

You got a couple great shots of her raptorial appendages (clubs) extended and on the last shot you can see the green, blue, black, and red swimmerets. I think they are called peacock mantis because their swimmerets look like a peacock feather.

PS....naming her Zeke is going to give her a complex. LOL
 

Montanarocknreefer

New Sheriff In Town
Joined
Jul 21, 2003
Messages
467
Location
Missoula, Montana
Kevin it is in a 10 gallon glass tank with a 15ww light. It is still small enough I don't worry about the tank being glass.

I toss in a live hermit or snail nowand then so it can use it's smashers which is good especially when they molt. I also feed it home made mush which it loves and easier to eat.:D
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
She is a real beauty! Remember - they need to use their smashers to keep them healthy.

Great pics, johnny!! Keep them coming!
 

Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
Here is some info by Dr. Caldwell on feeding....

Many stomatopods are picky about what they will eat and they will often hold out for the easiest item. A stomatopod being fed frozen shrimp will often not take snails for a couple of weeks until it gets really hungry and makes the switch. Then you may have trouble getting it back to shrimp. Other individuals may take whatever is offered.

Diet also depends on stage in the molt cycle. An animal that has recently molted won't be able to break snails or hermits. Later, it may prefer them.

I am a firm believer in variety for our animals. We feed snails (local Tegula), frozen shrimp, freeze-dried krill (with a liquid supplement), and even live adult brine shrimp and Hawaiian red shrimp (it gives them something to do to chase them down.)

What is important if you have a smasher like an O. scyllarus is to include some hard prey like snails or hermits so that the animal has to work to open them. Exercise seems to help avoid raptorial appendage loss during a molt.

As for frequency, most animals will eat every day, but they can go for a couple of weeks without food. As long as the animal is taking and eating what you provide, four or five feedings a week seems about right. However, I should note that we have video of animals in the field that shows that they feed two or three times a day if they can only catch something small. If they drag back a large crab or snail, that will usually do them for the day.

Roy
 

Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
Cool Beans!!!

I'm finding that people are FINALLY understanding why stomatopods are interesting. As a result, I like to provide info on mantis threads.

I'm thrilled that Zeke is doing well....great pic yet again.
 
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