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Sand Bed help

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forsaken541

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Spokane, WA
Could too shallow of a sand bed (like .5-1 inch) be the cause of a cyano problem that only affects the sand bed? I was told to get the benifits of a shallow bed that it should be about 2 inches deep. Should I add more to get it to a 2 inch depth or does it matter?
Erik :confused:
 

CarlaW

Scarlet Begonias
Joined
Feb 8, 2004
Messages
7,670
Location
Columbia Falls, MT.
I don't think that is a problem. Cyano is usually caused by too many nutrients being in the system, I believe. How often do you do water changes? Are you skimming, maybe your skimmer is not efficient enuf. Could you let us know a little more about your system? That would probably help us help you. :D :D
 

forsaken541

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Spokane, WA
Tnk is 1 year old, no trites, trates or amonia at all. 90 gal with a 5 gal fuge that goes into a 20 gal sump. Skimmer is an urchin pro driven with a mag 3. flow with 4 maxi jets and the mag 7 from sump along with an emporer 400 for mechanicle filtration. tank inhabitants are- 1 ocellaris, 1 hippo tang, 1 naso tang, 1 coral beuty, 1 royal gramma, 1 cleaner shrimp ,a whole buncha snails and some LPS and sofites. My lighting is 340W of PC with 3 month old bulbs that give the tank about 10 hrs of lighting with 1 of those being just actinics. I have macro in the fuge and run carbon off and on in the emporer. I have 75 lbs of LR and som rubble in the fuge. I do monthly 10% water changes and top off with kalk mixed with RO water which has new catridges. I did take out about a 2" sand bed about 2 months ago because the sand I used was play sand from HD which after further review was full of silicates. The new bed is not sand but is the small round pebble looking stuff made from aragonite. Thats all I can think to tell you. I am soo tired of the cyano on the sand bed that I am almost willing to try some sort of chemical measures, which I don't want to do.
Thanks for any help you can give me,
Erik
 

wrightme43

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2004
Messages
4,355
Location
bowling green ky
Sounds good actually to me. Did you know that cyano can turn nitrogen or ammonium into nitrate for food? That is my understanding. That is why I think you can have zero nitrates and low or no phosphates and still have cyanno. Mechanical (by hand) removal has worked the best for me in the past. Take a piece of dowel rod and rubberband it to the outside of a 1/4" hose so that the dowel rod sticks down about 2-3" past the end of the hose. Start a siphon and gently stir the top of the sand bed. Usually the cyanno will suck up and out and the sand will stay. If it is sucking sand, just pull the hose up on the dowel rod some.
HTH Steve
 

mojoreef

Reef Keeper
Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Messages
7,530
Location
Sumner
Sounds pretty good to me to. What salt mix do you use?? Have you attempted to stir it up a bit and syphon up a bit of the detritus??


Mike
 

forsaken541

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Spokane, WA
I have been using oceanic from the start and I do what I call Typhoon with a PH on the bed and rocks once a week to stir up anything that is hiding. Has anyone here tried using Eurythromycin on their tank for a cyano prob? I was reading some on Reef Central and there were a group of about four people who used this on tanks with everything from fish to sps, lps and softies and anemonea that dosed their tanks for a couple of days and it went away and for at least a few weeks did not have any ill effects it just got rid of the cyano totally. I usually stay away from additives in my tank totally outside of kalk but I would be willing to try almost anything to get rid of this problem. Thanks for your help,
Erik
 

MikeS

Well-known member
Joined
May 23, 2004
Messages
1,654
Location
Wyoming
Meds like eurythomycin and Furan2 will kill off the cyano, but they are also pretty rough on other bacterial life in your tank, so using them in the main tank isn't advised. Also, while these meds may kill they cyano, they do nothing to solve the underlying problem that is causing the bloom in the first place. Actually it can make it worse, because the dying/dead cyano just re-release all those nutrients back into the tank. Add that to a med damaged biofilter in your tank, and you can end up with a real mess...

Paitence is the key to beating cyano problems....like wrightme said, continue to suck out the cyano, this will help export some of the nutrients causing the problem...and like mojo said, remove as much detritus as you can. Couple this with some water changes (RO/DI of course, we don't want to add any more phosphates into the system) and phosphate reducing filter media, and you'll beat it eventually.

MikeS
 

forsaken541

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Spokane, WA
OK thanks guys for all your help, this really is the best board around. Friendly people and quick responses to questions. Thanks,
Erik
 
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