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Selcon and Corals

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Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
I filter fed my corals today with cyclopeeze soaked in selcon. My stylophora went nuts and now looks like a Christmas tree since it's green and has little red things stuck to it :) lol.... My question is, when the corals snag something like cyclo or use the selcon, where does the food go?? I don't really know how to search for the answer to that question. What does the selcon and cyclopeeze do to their growth rates?? I guess just a little more info about the subject would be helpful for me. I guess you could still call me a newbie :oops: ... That's my excuse anyways. My one year reefing mark is coming up :)
 

BlennyBabe

Rachel
Joined
Oct 7, 2003
Messages
260
Location
Gig Harbor Wa
http://coexploration.org/bbsr/coral/assets/images/polyp.jpg
http://science.northern.edu/biology/genbio/images/cnidariad.jpg
This is a pretty simple diagram showing a cross section of a simple coral polyp. Basically its whats called a blind digestive tract. That means that there is one opening for food and waste. The polyps tentacles take trap the food and put it into the mouth . Then it is digested by the "stomach". Whats not digested is spitout the mouth. It helps if you think of each polyp as small anemone. They are mostly just layers of tissue filled with water. Try searching for coral biology or cnidarian structure or anatomy.
The best thing I would suggest getting your hands on a good book. Lots of reefing books have some short discussion about corals and their anatomy and taxonomy. Good Luck. Hope I didnt confuse you more.

http://krupp.wcc.hawaii.edu/BIOL200/powerpnt/corlanat/
This site has good pictures.
 

Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
Great job Blennybabe!!!

I'll tackle the other question. One of the biggest selling factors of cyclop-eeze is the high quantity of HUFA's compared to most other pre-prepared foods. Selcon is designed to add these Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acids to lower quality foods. As a result, I don't think that you need to add Selcon to your cyclop-eeze.
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
whoops! :) My fish got some extra HUFA's today... lol.... Blennybabe, that's what I sort of figured, but didn't want to assume anything. I just wasn't sure if the zooanthalia benefited at all from target feedings (spell check doesn't know that one) :) Does anybody have a recommendation for a good book on corals? I know I've asked this before, but I forget what the best book is ;) I need info on placement, lighting, flow needs etc. Thanks for the help!
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
So what would be the benefits to target feeding my corals?? I've heard some people at the LFS's here say that it's not necessary. But the corals seem to enjoy it.
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
I think it depends on what corals you are attempting to target feed. Some corals need to be fed (i.e. non photosynthetic corals), others could use supplemental feeding, but may get all of their requirements from the fish being fed (i.e. blender mush, cyclopeeze) in addition to the light and fish waste. I think you need to know your livestock - certainly a huge LPS coral will have different feeding requirements than a SPS. When you say the corals seem to enjoy it....are you referring to polyp extension?

On the books - Borneman's book "Aquarium Corals" is a good one. I believe Julian Sprung's "Corals" book as a quick guide to requirements.
 

Curtswearing

Mantisfreak
Joined
Nov 20, 2003
Messages
2,203
Location
St. Louis, MO
Becky,

You have to look at the type of coral and where it normally lives in nature. Some things can be deduced quite quickly by asking 3 questions;

Where does this coral normally live?
How much tissue does this coral have?
How big is it's "mouth"?

It would be a good idea to read this thread.

Ok, you just had to ask about stylo's didn't you??? LOL This is one of the more difficult species to categorize because it tolerates a lot of different types of environments and there are so many sub-species. According to J. Veron,
The genus is dominated by two species, S. pistillata and S. subseriata, both of which show continuous variation over wide geographic ranges and thus both form complexes of geographic subspecies. S. pistillata also exhibits a wide range of environment-correlated growth-forms as it commonly occurs in habitats ranging from wave-washed reef flats to protected lagoons and lower reef slopes.
The reason that stylo's are so difficult is because they live in so many different areas of a reef. However, this is NOT the case for most corals. They are optimized for a specific location and don't tolerate much variance.

Coral Reef Zonation is very important IMO.
This is all well and good, but what does this have to do with someone wanting to have a small part of a reef in their home? In actual fact it is very important. If it is understood where a particular genus/species thrives and exists on a natural reef, then the conditions that it requires within an aquarium can be inferred. For example if a coral is found on the reef rock rim, then it is exposed to high light intensity and strong wave surges. To keep such a coral health and happy in an aquarium under similar conditions then intense lighting and devices that cause surges throughout the tank are required. On the other hand if it is found on the reef slope, then it is exposed to low light levels, very few surges and strong currents. Such a coral requires lower lighting levels and more constant water currents to be kept in an aquarium.
You just happened to pick a "less-picky" coral for this thread. Regardless, don't put too much weight into polyp extension anyway. Read this thread on polyp extension.
 

Angelscrx

Import Fish
Joined
Jul 30, 2004
Messages
1,103
Location
Ettrick, VA
NaH2O said:
I think it depends on what corals you are attempting to target feed. Some corals need to be fed (i.e. non photosynthetic corals), others could use supplemental feeding, but may get all of their requirements from the fish being fed (i.e. blender mush, cyclopeeze) in addition to the light and fish waste. I think you need to know your livestock - certainly a huge LPS coral will have different feeding requirements than a SPS. When you say the corals seem to enjoy it....are you referring to polyp extension?

On the books - Borneman's book "Aquarium Corals" is a good one. I believe Julian Sprung's "Corals" book as a quick guide to requirements.
When it comes to reef keeping everything has a "depends" you have to try and find what works best for your corals.

Hey Nikki interesting avatar care to explain? Not as pretty as the last one! :D
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
Wow thanks for all the additional reading! I was refering mostly to my stylo here since it's my baby :) I have a question about the polyp extension now. What about the "fuzzy" corals like stylos and pocillapora?? My stylo has polyps that look like little tiny anemones the tips of each polyp is neon green which gives the coral it's green coloration. The further the polyps are extended from the coral, the greener it looks. It's growth rate is amazing. I watch this coral a lot. Chemical stimulants actually cause this coral to retract it's polyps. If my fish brushes it, polyps will retract. Having watched it closely for almost a year now, It seems like when the stylo is happy, it's polyps are bushy and full. After target feeding the stylo yesterday there are larger areas of visible growth and it is as bushy and green as ever. Am I wrong here in assuming that this specific coral is happy due to it's polyp extension?? Thanks so much for the input!
 

SaltwaterTeen

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Messages
379
Location
SE Idaho
I like to feed my kenya tree cyclopeeze :D Becky, is that a saddle back clown for your avatar? If so I have a brown saddleback and he has his own green carpet anemone :)
 

SaltwaterTeen

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Messages
379
Location
SE Idaho
Aww, kinda thought it was either a clarkii, but looks alittle like a brown saddleback with the brown, yellow, and the white rings :D
 

NaH2O

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
8,568
I think you need to look at the overall picture, Becky. Does the coral have good growth? Does it appear to have any type of disease? What is the normal pattern for this particular coral. We may not have these listed on paper answering them, but for most of us, when we look at our livestock, we make observations and mental notes of things that appear "off". My digitata since being eaten by my bicolor blenny on a continual basis, now, doesn't extend its polyps until lights off. Certainly looking at it during the day, it isn't very pretty. It is still growing, minus quite a few polyps, but is extended at night. You can add some sugar solution near a coral and watch the response. I believe there are some additives with something like sugar to get a response....which the hobbyist equates as a "good" thing (I believe Anthony Calfo has indicated the same thing on a post). Don't put too much into polyp extension, as there are many reasons for it. However, do put A LOT into knowing your livestock and your tank. You don't want to end up introducing too many nutrients because you think the corals like it....you'll end up with other issues, like algae.

Hey Nikki interesting avatar care to explain? Not as pretty as the last one!
Wow - Thanks! This is a picture of Brutus the very large walrus that sucks his flipper for comfort.
 
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