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SPS RTN!!!! What do I do with it?

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The R/C Man

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
423
Location
Spokane WA
Hi everyone!

I have a small colony of florescent yellow acropora that is turning white. It started with a small spot 2 days and now the whole coral is almost white. I pulled it out of the main tank and put it in the fuge. Could this spread to other corals? Could it come back or is it doomed? Should I take it out of the tank? Help....
 

MCSInc

Reef Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
259
Location
Sedro Woolley, WA
Read: SPS Heaven > @#^%& - RTN attack

Under the thread @#^%& - RTN attack there are a lot of really good suggestions - but the most common suggestion is use carbon. Sounds like it can do no harm but can do a lot of good. And according to the above mentioned thread yes it can spread.

Good luck on saving the rest of your reef.
 

G~

Super Gobie
Joined
Jul 25, 2003
Messages
133
are you sure it is RTN'ing and not just bleaching? RTN has all the tissue falling off of the skeleton. bleaching sounds more like what you have going on. where parts of the coral are turning white, but the coral tissue is still attached to the skeleton.

i have found that bleaching is usually caused by high temps or to much light. try moving the coral to a different place in the system.

hth,

G~
 

The R/C Man

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
423
Location
Spokane WA
Thanks!

I was reading through it earlier. I have having problems keeping my calcium and alkalinity levels up. So the other day I pulled out a bunch of Halmidea and chucked it. Hopefully that will help with that issue. I have noticed that my tank smells stronger than normal so I will do a water change tomorrow. Even though I just did one a couple weeks ago. Just in case.
 

RockyHeap

Evil Genius
Joined
Jun 30, 2003
Messages
232
Location
Sultan, Wa
I was the the author of @#%$@^ RTN, and it's presently receeded and all corals are once again thriving.

RTN, sigh......, so frustrating and yet not fully understood on the trigger that causes it.

I can only speak from my past several outbreaks over the last 3-5 years. Typically a new coral gets introduced into the tank, or some event is a major stress to an established coral. The tissue starts to slough off and the whole flesh from a 4" frag can simply dissapear over night.

I've done several things for next steps. Once the RTN has started, its really best to frag off whatever heathy branches you can. I've lost big colonies by being tardy in treatment. Putting the whole colony in the sump or fuge can cause the RTN to spread as the sloughing flesh gets spread about with the water current.

I've seen the infection spread to several close corals down current from an infected member, so IMHO its best to really isolate the infected member ASAP, or toss the whole rock.

Carbon can't hurt, do more frequent water changes, and stable water quality all are good.
 

The R/C Man

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
423
Location
Spokane WA
Thanks for all the help guys....

I pulled the coral from the tank all together. It only took a total of two days to become completely white. I figured it is better to loose one than a bunch if it spreads.....
 

randythereefer

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2004
Messages
56
Location
Spokane Washington
My solution for RTN has always been to frag above the RTN point. I've had a Acropora Microthalma that has RTN'd in the past for a variety of reasons:

1) Salinity level correction.
2) PH too high.
3) Caulerpa getting too close.


Its a fast grower but always the first one to show sign of trouble. I've honestly found that fraggin it above the troubled spot does the trick. In addition I've found that 1 part Kalk to 5 parts vinegar doesed nightly for me has helped my calcium/alkalinity woes tremendously. I have some halmedia and a fast growing montipora digitata that zap the levels down faster than anything.
 

Imaexpat2

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2003
Messages
14
frag it and salvage what you can has been the best retaliation for me. There is an anti-biotic that can be used with some effect but its available through a vet, and requires a prescription. RTN is a real bummer!!! Not that bleaching is anymore fun.
 

The R/C Man

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
423
Location
Spokane WA
Too late! When I first noticed it I thought it was stung by another coral the next day it was over half white. The next morning all white..... It spread really fast and went up the side so there wasn't much to frag especially since it was just a frag its self. I am watching the tank closely and everything seems good. I did have my alk drop dramatically recently and I have since brought it back up. I am thinking that caused the coral to stress....
 

The R/C Man

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
423
Location
Spokane WA
Hey Kevin!

I bought that one from you back in Oct I think. It was doing fine the whole time until just recently. I am pretty sure it was from the stress I induced upon it. Thanks!
 

jon warner

in the Biz...
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
29
Location
Los Angeles
Yes,
RTN can be a B****. We worked through 1997 to develop a product that was sent to the South Pacific and is still used by many collectors today.
My take on RTN:
1) Attack early. Try a dip immediately.
2) If conditions persists, immediately frag and move frags to a high circ area.
3) Add GAC
4) Watch the tank carefully. Oftentimes a single case WILL spread.
 
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