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Treating for ICH

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Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
I'd like to hear what methods have worked for you in quarantine to rid your fish of ICH. I was reading on another forum that hypo doesn't always work. Thanks for your input!
 

fishermann

Well-known member
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Jul 13, 2003
Messages
670
Location
Searcy, Arkansas
Becky I have UV on my quarantine tank [i have it on all my tanks] and I don't treat with anything,most of the time if your water parims are good and your water quality is good and clean the majority of fish well get rid of ich on their own if given time. Keep it fed and the water good and it should rid itself in a few weeks. Watch it closely each day and if it isn't getting worse I would give him time to rid himself. I have soaked my food in garlic, can't swear it works but it seams to make them want to eat better and it is supposed to help rid the fish of ich, just be careful and don't pollute the tank with tomuch of it.
 

mojoreef

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Garlic is a good preventitive measure but doesnt do much once they got it. Hypo is probibly the best method I know of


Mike
 

Ray Pollett

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
196
Location
Blaine, WA
I prefer to get rid of the stress that has weakened them. They then can fight it off naturally. That means Hiding places, proper food, and proper water conditions along with correct tank mates.

Ray
 

cheeks69

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Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
306
Location
Southcoast, MA
"There are many purported treatments for cryptocaryonosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these methods or therapies are only partially effective at best. There are currently only three proven, consistently reliable, treatments. These consist of copper treatment, salinity manipulation (i.e. hyposalinity) and the transfer method. Even the best treatments currently available have limitations and/or drawbacks."

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/jan2004/mini3.htm


"It is a common misconception among hobbyists that fish must be in a weakened state before they are susceptible to infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. Stress is a factor as it does reduce immune function in fish. This makes it less likely that fish will develop some level of acquired immunity after becoming infected. However, stress (or weakened condition) is not a prerequisite to infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. Healthy fish that are not unduly stressed are susceptible to infection upon exposure to this pathogen. It is noteworthy that stress has not been mentioned as a factor when infecting fish in clinical trails with Cryptocaryon irritans. "

"Cryptocaryon irritans is an obligate parasite, meaning that it cannot complete its life cycle (at the trophont stage) without a host fish. Taking into account that the normal time frame in which tomonts will hatch ranges from 3 to 28 days, a fallow (without fish) period of 30 days to 6 weeks is recommended to eliminate this parasite from an aquarium. Removing all potential hosts from a system for this period of time should eradicate the pest from the aquarium. If the fish are removed from the display to another aquarium for treatment and an effective means of therapy (i.e. hyposalinity or copper treatments) is employed, then those fish will be clean of infection. "

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/nov2003/mini1.htm


"Ultra violet sterilizers can help prevent the spread of infection between aquariums in a multi-tank system. When an ultra violet sterilizer is placed in the water flow between tanks in a multi-tank system it can eradicate theronts before they can spread into the next aquarium. However, UV lights are less effective at eliminating infection within a single aquarium. Free-swimming theronts can exit tomonts and infect fish before passing through an ultra violet sterilizer. This means that the parasite will continue its cycle life cycle within that aquarium (Gratzek, et al., 1983). Gratzek's study was performed with freshwater "ick" Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, but it is also believed to apply to Cryptocaryon irritans."


"Using herbal remedies to combat Cryptocaryon irritans or ich has become more commonplace over the past few years with marine aquarists. Garlic, in particular, has become popular. The foods are soaked daily with garlic prior to feeding the fish for several weeks to combat ich. Unfortunately, evidence to support garlic's effectiveness or lack thereof, for the treatment of Cryptocaryon irritans is anecdotal (Bartelme, 2003a. Cortes-Jorge, 2000). It seems to work in some cases, especially with light infections, and not in others. However there is some evidence to support garlic as a treatment for some other types of parasites."

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/feb2004/mini4.htm
 
Last edited:

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
My water params are good. The only other fish in the tank is a bi colored blenny and they leave each other alone. I don't add anything to the water besides calcium and I test for it. It's around 480. There are PLENTY of hiding places for my fish. I feed them an extremely varied diet. Mysis shrimp, Cyclopeeze, formula 1 and 2 Ocean Nutrition Red and Green Seaweed diet, krill, plankton. I could go on more. I feed them 2 to 3 times per day at the same times, the same ammounts. What could be causing the ICH??? It drives me nuts because I take such good care of my fish.
 

cheeks69

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Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
306
Location
Southcoast, MA
Ick is a parasite and once introduced to your tank the only way to eliminate the parasite would be to remove the fish to a quarantine tank and treat with hyposalinity or copper and leave the tank fallow {without any fish }for a minimum of 4 weeks to let the parasite run it's course.
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
I did that with this current tank. I added fish after about a month and a half and it now has ICH. My water was perfect. I lost some fish to ICH so I removed the water put new in and let the tank re-cycle for a month and a half then added fish. The Clarkii has Ich now. I wish I could keep it away. Does anybody else have a problem with it?
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
The clarkii seems to shake it off from day to day. The cysts seem to go away during day hours and re-appear in the morning and late at night. I did a 1/4 water change today, so hopefully that will help out a little. He's eating well, so I'm not too worried yet. He's actually a bit of a pig =)
 

cheeks69

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Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
306
Location
Southcoast, MA
If you leave your tank fallow and don't quaratine then Ick will be reintroduced to your tank. I know this from personal experience and after losing most of my fish population, I will quarantine all my new fish before introducing them to my new tank.
 

jesshimom

I have no fish.
Joined
Oct 9, 2003
Messages
2,323
Location
Lovely Lynnwood
Listen to fishermann! I did just what he said and everything got well. I have a sterilizer on my tank now and leave it on all the time! I did not treat the fish with anything. I tried the garlic too and i't didn't do anything. I occasionally give them some in their food now but not too often.
 

Beckmola24

Hawkfish
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
1,112
Location
Columbus, OH
I will have to get one!!! I'm sick and tired of ICH! lol =) Did it do anything to your pod population? I've heard tell that it can kill some beneficial copepods too... Don't know if that's just hearsay or not... Thanks!
 

Ray Pollett

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
196
Location
Blaine, WA
cheeks69 said:
"There are many purported treatments for cryptocaryonosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these methods or therapies are only partially effective at best. There are currently only three proven, consistently reliable, treatments. These consist of copper treatment, salinity manipulation (i.e. hyposalinity) and the transfer method. Even the best treatments currently available have limitations and/or drawbacks."

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/jan2004/mini3.htm


"It is a common misconception among hobbyists that fish must be in a weakened state before they are susceptible to infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. Stress is a factor as it does reduce immune function in fish. This makes it less likely that fish will develop some level of acquired immunity after becoming infected. However, stress (or weakened condition) is not a prerequisite to infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. Healthy fish that are not unduly stressed are susceptible to infection upon exposure to this pathogen. It is noteworthy that stress has not been mentioned as a factor when infecting fish in clinical trails with Cryptocaryon irritans. "

"Cryptocaryon irritans is an obligate parasite, meaning that it cannot complete its life cycle (at the trophont stage) without a host fish. Taking into account that the normal time frame in which tomonts will hatch ranges from 3 to 28 days, a fallow (without fish) period of 30 days to 6 weeks is recommended to eliminate this parasite from an aquarium. Removing all potential hosts from a system for this period of time should eradicate the pest from the aquarium. If the fish are removed from the display to another aquarium for treatment and an effective means of therapy (i.e. hyposalinity or copper treatments) is employed, then those fish will be clean of infection. "

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/nov2003/mini1.htm


"Ultra violet sterilizers can help prevent the spread of infection between aquariums in a multi-tank system. When an ultra violet sterilizer is placed in the water flow between tanks in a multi-tank system it can eradicate theronts before they can spread into the next aquarium. However, UV lights are less effective at eliminating infection within a single aquarium. Free-swimming theronts can exit tomonts and infect fish before passing through an ultra violet sterilizer. This means that the parasite will continue its cycle life cycle within that aquarium (Gratzek, et al., 1983). Gratzek's study was performed with freshwater "ick" Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, but it is also believed to apply to Cryptocaryon irritans."


"Using herbal remedies to combat Cryptocaryon irritans or ich has become more commonplace over the past few years with marine aquarists. Garlic, in particular, has become popular. The foods are soaked daily with garlic prior to feeding the fish for several weeks to combat ich. Unfortunately, evidence to support garlic's effectiveness or lack thereof, for the treatment of Cryptocaryon irritans is anecdotal (Bartelme, 2003a. Cortes-Jorge, 2000). It seems to work in some cases, especially with light infections, and not in others. However there is some evidence to support garlic as a treatment for some other types of parasites."

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/feb2004/mini4.htm
While I agree with what was said about garlic, I disagree with the stress portion. As is so usual in science today; most is a pile of rot in my opinion. I'll continue to ignore it and cure it the way that has worked for years. Relieve the stress.

Ray
 

Ray Pollett

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
196
Location
Blaine, WA
cheeks69 said:
Ick is a parasite and once introduced to your tank the only way to eliminate the parasite would be to remove the fish to a quarantine tank and treat with hyposalinity or copper and leave the tank fallow {without any fish }for a minimum of 4 weeks to let the parasite run it's course.
IMO not even close to true. I've taken fish covered with ich and put them in tanks that are set up correctly for them and they have recovered every time in the last 15 years. Nor has any of the other fish that were already in the tanks come down with it. I've done it too many times for it to be luck or for me to believe most of what I hear.

Ray
 

mojoreef

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Joined
Jul 5, 2003
Messages
7,530
Location
Sumner
I've taken fish covered with ich and put them in tanks that are set up correctly for them and they have recovered every time in the last 15 years.
I am not following you on this one Ray. Are you saying you put ich covered fish into a established tank with other fish??

Mike
 

cheeks69

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
306
Location
Southcoast, MA
I've taken fish covered with ich and put them in tanks that are set up correctly for them and they have recovered every time in the last 15 years.
Well in your opinion what is a tank that is set up correctly ? What if it was Amyloodiniumiasis do you still think that you could put these fish in a stress free environment and they would be OK ?
 

Ray Pollett

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
196
Location
Blaine, WA
cheeks69 said:
Well in your opinion what is a tank that is set up correctly ?

Correct size, Correct water parameters, Sufficient hidding places (territories), Proper flow, proper tank mates and proper food(diet)



What if it was Amyloodiniumiasis do you still think that you could put these fish in a stress free environment and they would be OK ?
Do not know that one. Do not keep up with 50 cent words.

Ray
 
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